Shopping Cart
Your Cart is Empty
Quantity:
Subtotal
Taxes
Shipping
Total
There was an error with PayPalClick here to try again
CelebrateThank you for your business!You should be receiving an order confirmation from Paypal shortly.Exit Shopping Cart

Sweet Pea Births

Chandler, Arizona

Sweet Pea Births

...celebrating every swee​t pea their birth

Blog

In Their Own Words: Courtney

Posted on August 26, 2016 at 7:08 AM Comments comments (0)
"In Their Own Words" is a blog series we share to bring you "real life" experiences from other mothers and their families.  Would you like to share your story? Please email me at krystyna{at}sweetpeabirths{dot}com to get started.

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson

Today we are featuring a Q&A we did with one of our pumping and working-out-of-the-home mothers. She shares her insight gained from pumping for both of her sweet peas, for a combined total of 34 months...and counting.

What was your vision of what pumping at work was going to entail?
I thought I knew what pumping at work was going to be like. I thought it would be a nice break in my day to sit and think about my baby. It was inconvenient and awkward to constantly explain myself. I had read all these books about breastfeeding, gone to support groups, talked to a Lactation consultant, talked to friends, and when it came down to it, I still had to find my own way. 

All the knowledge helped, but each relationship and situation is unique. I knew it was going to be work, and I knew that I could do it. I didn't realize how long I would be doing it. 2 years. I pumped at work for nearly 2 years.

I think that the most important step of the journey was making the commitment and educating myself. The most important part of making that successful was being surrounded by people that supported that commitment, and talking about it.

What was the reality?
At first, I was lucky. I worked with a group of women who were extremely supportive, including my best friend, who was still pumping for her son, 7 months older than my daughter. We brought in a couch, and ate lunch one handed, pumping side by side, while chatting with our colleagues, who breastfed their children. This gave me confidence that I didn't realize I would need later. Everything was normal.

What I didn't count on was leaving that job and starting over at a new school. I knew that I would pump when I went back to work, but I never really thought about how long I would do it. My daughter was 9 months old when I started at my new school. Though still supportive, there was no couch and no camaraderie. I was isolated and lonely. At about 12 months, I was starting to hate it. I would pump in my car, but hooking up with the stupid hands-free bra in a car that had been sitting in the sun all day while trying not to expose myself to passers-by. What a sweaty, frustrating ordeal. But! I kept doing it until she was nearly 2, sometimes cursing about it, but I did it.

Who did you have to talk to to make it happen?
Empowered by the ease of my first experience with pumping at work, in my new school, I knew what I was entitled too, but most of all, I was open about talking to people about pumping and breastfeeding, especially  the”extended” relationship. I wrote a very professional, informed, and informative email that sent to the entire Administrative team at the high school where I teach. My principal thanked me for the information that I provided and we even chatted for awhile about the inequity of motherhood in the workplace and how we both hope to see it change in our lifetime. As a single guy, he had never thought about it. I developed a view of myself as an advocate and found ways to normalize and  remove the stigma of  breastfeeding and pumping at work for an extended time. The more I talked about it frankly with those around me, the less I got a reaction; which I think is awesome! That's normalizing, right? Now that I am pumping for my 2nd child, my co-workers don’t bat an eyelash when I say, “I'll be back in 20. Going to make lunch for my son.”

What kind of provision did your employer make; and was it easy, or did you have to push hard?
I took the lead on advocating for myself in the workplace. I took the attitude of, “If I walk in like I own the place, no one will question me.” When I wrote my email to my administrators and had follow up conversations, I made sure to be informed and provide links to state and federal information, guidelines, and statutes that supported me. I informed my administrators of what was legally expected of them and what I was entitled to. I also provided them with my pumping schedule, and the location that I planned to pump. It was more like, “this is what I’m doing, and this is why you have to let me.” It wasn’t that I expected backlash. I wanted to be clear and straightforward.
My department head was very accommodating in scheduling my prep period for a time that was best for me to space out my pumping. I believe that all of this seemed “easy” because I was well informed and took the role of educating and informing my workplace, advocating for myself, and for other mothers in the future. I didn’t expect them to know what to do, and I didn’t expect anyone to change they way they went about their day to accommodate my needs. My commitment to my child would come first if there were any issues, but there were not.

What kind of support did your partner provide that was helpful?
My partner is extremely supportive, but didn’t quite get why I feel dejected when he would tell me “just pump” when I was trying to schedule my life around feeding my baby. We talked about it, and I explained rather than getting frustrated and shutting down. I would describe how frustrating it was to try to hook up to my pump in the car, in the heat, with a hands-free bra, and a nursing cover, or how I couldn’t do “x” because it was too close to feeding time, or wouldn’t allow me time to feed... and then I ran across an ad for the Freemie on Facebook! He bought me a set. I loved it. Then I complained that I had to wash them every day, and he bought me a second set, so I didn’t have to wash them every day. Best. Husband. Ever.

How much time should a mom plan for each pumping session? Any tips for better/easier letdown?
I usually pump for about 15 minutes. If I reflect on how I got to that, I started by pumping until I wasn’t ejecting any more milk. That would usually take about 20-25 minutes, which was about the length of my commute to work. I discovered that I was pumping more than the baby was eating, I would end up engorged on the weekends. I cut down to 15 minutes and now I end up about even with what baby consumes while I am gone.
To trigger letdown, at first I would just talk about my baby with my colleagues. Especially pumping side-by-side with another momma, let down was not difficult to achieve. Now, I start to let down a few minutes before I start pumping. When I changed schools, it was a little more difficult. I didn’t have that camaraderie any more. On more stressful days, it would take a little longer to trigger letdown. On these days, I sit quietly, turn off distractions, and breathe. Looking at pictures hasn’t worked for me in the past, but closing my eyes and visualizing nursing my baby has helped.

How long did you make the pumping commitment work - how did that match your expectations?
When we decided to breastfeed my husband and I talked about it. I wanted to do at least a year, but thought about continuing the more I learned about extended breastfeeding. Hubby was super supportive of extended breastfeeding, so I made the commitment to nurse as long as my daughter wanted to. I ended up weaning her when I became pregnant. She and I made it 22 months. I am now on month 12 of nursing and pumping for my son. I know that I probably sound like an ad for Freemie, but with Freemie, I don’t see myself stopping until he’s not nursing during the day anymore.

What words of advice would you give to someone who is ready to go back to work and wants to pump for their baby?
Be informed. Inform others. Have a plan. Have a backup plan. Keep perspective. This is for your baby, everybody else can take a number. You are legally protected. Get comfortable saying things like “expressing milk” and “breastfeeding” to complete strangers. They don’t understand euphemisms. I’ve pumped in many places that weren’t schools and I’ve never been told that they couldn’t help me. I hope it was because I was confident and informed. If I were being completely truthful, I smiled inside when I saw someone squirm. I thought to myself, “I’m making them change. This is good.” This is your right and my right to provide for our children. The more we make people uncomfortable, the more comfortable they become and the more “normal” feeding babies breastmilk will be for future generations.

As for the bottle, ask friends to borrow different types of bottles before you spend a fortune. Both of our kids like the Dr. Browns bottles, but that isn’t what we had a full set of. . .
I took twelve weeks off with both of my kids. With my daughter (first born) we tried a bottle with her the week before I went back. This was not soon enough because she wouldn’t take a bottle and I went to my first day back thinking, “my baby isn’t going to eat.” She did, and everything was fine, but I was stressed, which made it harder to pump and made it harder for me to do my job. I think even two weeks out would have been good. 

Don’t be the one to give baby the bottle. Have a partner, friend, or family member do it so the baby will actually try. I had to leave the house to get my daughter to even attempt a bottle. From our experience, don’t wait until they are starving. Giving a crying baby a bottle for the first time didn’t work out for us.

Bottom line? Be confident. Be informed. Inform others. Find your path. Ask for help. Be an advocate.


Thank you to Courtney for sharing her breastfeeding journey today <3 I hope it has touched you and inspired you in some way, and that you will take heart and courage in your own breastfeeding journey.

UPCOMING EVENTS:
Phoenix La Leche League: Live, Latch, Love
As part of the LLL area conference
August 26th, 5-7 PM
Embassy Suites Biltmore
 
La Leche League Conference
August 26-28, 2016
Embassy Suites Biltmore

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
Disclaimer: 
The material included in this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and related videos contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of Birthing From Within or The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of Birthing From Within, The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

Breastfeeding Your Newborn

Posted on August 25, 2016 at 9:57 AM Comments comments (0)

Wardrobe provided by Modern Mommy Boutique

Breastfeeding is biologically designed to keep us wired to our newborns so that they stay warm, safe, and alive.

All those glossy, shiny pictures that show ethereal mothers and sleeping babies - they are nice. Realistic? Not so much.

The immediate postpartum period is hazy. We are coming out of the birth journey through labor land, our hormones are adjusting to being not pregnant, we are minus the placenta that has been a hormone factory since it formed in utero to support the pregnancy; oh, and we have a tiny little human to look at in wonder and keep alive every day.  Add in all the leaking from our eyes, our breasts, and our vagina...and the possibility that everyone wants to come over and see the baby so now you have the pressure of cleaning a house and being presentable yourself...it's a chaos and adjustment period like no other.

Like today's quote says, breastfeeding meets all of our newborn's needs: safety, security, and nourishment.  I have said this before and I will say it again...the only thing you *have* to do in the immediate postpartum is rest and get to know your baby.  Dim the lights, stay in bed, do lots of skin-to-skin with your newborn; get up only to use the restroom or shower.

Let everyone else take care of you: all meals in bed, and limit visitors to the ones that are comfortable seeing you naked and/or breastfeeding (and that you are comfortable if they see you naked and/or breastfeeding!). The only thing you need to do in the days after your baby is born is recover from the birth journey and feed your baby. I ask my students to at least consider a minimum "lying-in" period of 3-7 days. 

It is important for everyone to get sunshine. Along with lying in, we also did about 30-60 minutes outside during indirect sunlight hours to go for a walk and get some fresh air while keeping baby skin-to-skin.

Once you have gotten lots of sleep to recover from the birth journey and have breastfeeding established, start adding more to your routine. If you have older children, it is definitely okay to ask for help with them so at the very minimum mom and the new baby can bond and get organized with living, breathing, and breastfeeding together. This is a great time for the partner to step up and do bonding time with the older siblings so that they feel attended to and seen even though there is a new person in the house.  

You can also switch roles! We would have a nap time when Bruss would do skin-to-skin with the new baby while I stayed out of the bedroom. I would use that time to connect with the older sweet peas in the house. Maybe we would go outside together, read a book, play games, do a craft; something to let them know that they were still seen and loved by me although I had the new sweet pea to nourish, too.

In this age of information, it is easy to read too much and get overwhelmed with all the do's and don'ts that are available on the internet and on-line forums, including this post you are reading right now!!  My best advice: read your baby.  The baby books are general information.  YOU KNOW YOUR BABY BEST. Never, ever doubt your mother's intuition.

You know what your baby needs, your baby knows what (s)he needs, just do that. You cannot spoil a baby by holding them too much.  You cannot overfeed a breastfed baby, even if it was just 20 minutes since the last time they ate: you are giving them a LIVE fluid that is easily digested and used efficiently by the body...yes, they might *really* be hungry again.

The last idea I want to leave you with is the two magic words: FOR NOW.  This phase you and your baby (and the family) are going through is FOR NOW. It is not forever, it is not for a lifetime...it is FOR NOW. The baby is eating around the clock FOR NOW. The baby is not sleeping FOR NOW. You are feeding around the clock FOR NOW. You are cluster feeding FOR NOW. You are leaking everywhere FOR NOW.

The phases will pass and you will be onto the next FOR NOW before you realize it. By the time your sweet pea is 6 months old, you will have a good handle on this keeping them safe and alive thing that is also called parenting.  Ask for help when you need it from the people who will do what needs to be done without passing judgement on your choices for your family. Seek out and become involved in support groups (they are available online and IRL) that align with your parenting philosophy and breastfeeding goals.

Best wishes as you make your way in the world with your sweet pea - you've got this.  You are the parent that your baby needs.

UPCOMING EVENTS:
Phoenix La Leche League: Live, Latch, Love
As part of the LLL area conference
August 26th, 5-7 PM
Embassy Suites Biltmore
 
La Leche League Conference
August 26-28, 2016
Embassy Suites Biltmore

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
Disclaimer: 
The material included in this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and related videos contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of Birthing From Within or The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of Birthing From Within, The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

Does breastfeeding have to be hard?

Posted on August 24, 2016 at 12:39 PM Comments comments (0)
Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
Petunia Picklebottom Bag provided by Modern Mommy Boutique

I have to wonder how we survived as a species without hospitals and IBCLCs for so long.  I think it goes back to the possibility that birth and breastfeeding are behaviors that are learned best by watching and participating.

When we see and honor undisturbed birth, when we accept or acknowledge that the pain of childbirth is meant to inform and transform us, and it is not something that has to be inherently feared, we can start to take back birth.

When we are able to treat breasts as normal, when we can feed our babies without wondering if we are going to be harassed or shamed by family and strangers, when our children can learn about breastfeeding by watching us feed their siblings and cousins, then we start to normalize breastfeeding.

While I am eternally grateful for the help of care providers when *it is necessary* for healthy mom, healthy baby outcomes, and absolutely in awe of the good IBCLCs that help mothers meet their breastfeeding goals, I think we have to ask ourselves WHY.

WHY are we still accepting a cesarean rate that is over 30%?

WHY are we silent when our maternal and infant outcomes are the most dismal among industrialized nations?

WHY are we so quick to give up on breastfeeding when it is the best thing to get moms and babies organized and off to a good start?

I wish I had answers...since I don't, I will continue to advocate for mothers, babies and birth.  I will add my voice in support of organizations like Arizonans for Birth Options, Improving Birth and Birth Monopoly.  I will continue to support La Leche League, Breastfeeding USA, and ILCA.  I will continue to teach about childbirth and train as a doula, and learn as much as I can about supporting families through birth.  My mission is that each family I have the privilege to walk alongside on their birth journey has a better chance of NOT being traumatized by their birth experience, and that our students know about the amazing resources to help them along the way should they need them.

What about you...what can you do in your corner of the world to support, birth, breastfeeding, mothers and babies?

UPCOMING EVENTS:
Phoenix La Leche League: Live, Latch, Love
As part of the LLL area conference
August 26th, 5-7 PM
Embassy Suites Biltmore
 
La Leche League Conference
August 26-28, 2016
Embassy Suites Biltmore

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson


Disclaimer: 
The material included in this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and related videos contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of Birthing From Within or The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of Birthing From Within, The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.
 




Q&A with SPB: How does thyroid function affect breastfeeding?

Posted on August 23, 2016 at 12:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson

Today's question is answered by Jennie Bever, PhD, IBCLC* at the Arizona Breastfeeding Center:






https://youtu.be/21HGacWaOCc


Synopsis:
Breastfeeding is an "energetically expensive" activity for the human body.  In order for breastfeeding to work well, a mother's thyroid has to be working well to adjust for the mother's energy needs.

Postpartum thyroiditis is more common than you might imagine.  If you are tired (more than usual for postpartum), you notice that your hair is falling out more, and you suspect that your milk supply is affected and/or lower than you would expect, you might have a low functioning thyroid gland.

Hypothyroid: low-functioning below normal levels for pregnancy+lactation
Moms with a low-functioning thyroid typically experience low milk supply.  If you suspect that you might have a low-functioning thyroid, have your thyroid levels checked by your IBCLC* or your primary care provider.  Once your thyroid function is regulated, you will probably see your milk supply go back up.

Hyperthyroid: high-functioning above normal levels for pregnancy+lactation
Moms with a hyper-functioning thyroid typically experience the ability to make enough milk, but it won't come out.  Basically, the ability to "let-down" is inhibited. If you suspect that you might have hyper-functioning thyroid, have your thyroid levels checked by your IBCLC* or your primary care provider. Once your thyroid production is regulated, you will probably be able to let-down when your baby latches as one would expect to when breastfeeding.

Three notes:
  1. The body's thyroid needs change throughout the course of pregnancy and lactation.  Be sure to check in with your care providers and let them know if you have a pre-existing thyroid condition as you enter the childbearing phase so that your levels can be monitored. 
  2. If you have a family history or suspect that your thyroid function has changed, don't hesitate to ask to have your thyroid levels checked.  The ranges for thyroid level during pregnancy and lactation are different than the needs of the general population, so be sure you are following up with a professional care provider.  
  3. If the thyroid function needs to be addressed, treating moms tends to also resolve the breastfeeding issues associated with thyroid function.

I hope that you received some answers and/or validation if you have pre-existing thyroid conditions, or if you suspect your thyroid is a little off. Never hesitate to ask the questions that will get you the help you need so you can breastfeed your Sweet Pea and meet your breastfeeding goals.


*IBCLC: International Board-Certified Lactation Consultant

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson

UPCOMING EVENTS:
Phoenix La Leche League: Live, Latch, Love
As part of the LLL area conference 
 August 26th, 5-7 PM 
 Embassy Suites Biltmore   

 La Leche League Conference 
 August 26-28, 2016 
 Embassy Suites Biltmore 

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
Disclaimer: 
The material included in this video is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and related videos contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of Birthing From Within or The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of Birthing From Within, The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.





In Their Own Words: Katie ~ 2016 Update

Posted on August 22, 2016 at 12:15 PM Comments comments (0)
"In Their Own Words" is a blog series we share to bring you "real life" experiences from other mothers and their families.  Would you like to share your story? Please email me at [email protected] to get started.

 
Click HERE to read Katie’s submission for our ITOW series in 2012, written when her older nursling was 19 weeks old.
 
If you've read my earlier breastfeeding stories, you know how much I've dreamed of tandem breastfeeding. My dream came true July 2015. I've been tandem breastfeeding for over 13 months now, with my older nursling - my third child - being 4.5 years old (and I haven't had a decent night's sleep in about 4.5 years). If you've read my earlier stories, you will also notice this one is shorter. I think it's because we've just hit our groove. Anyway, you're probably here to learn about tandem breastfeeding.
 
I cannot say how amazing tandem breastfeeding can be. Obviously it can be convenient when both nurslings need comfort, especially at bedtime when everyone is cranky. 

Beyond the convenience, is the amazing: I'm talking about snuggling two children close to me while they look into my eyes or drift off to sleep. I'm talking about intense bonding hormones washing over me like a tidal wave. I'm talking about looking down to see my two children holding hands as they do their favorite thing together. I'm even talking about the laugh I get when they fight while they're breastfeeding, just like they did when she breastfed while he was still in utero. I'm definitely also talking about the laugh I get when the baby trolls the preschooler, like slowing moving his hand closer and closer to "her" boob or tousling her hair and brushing it into her face. (Seriously...as bad as I feel for her, it is hilarious.)
 
On the other hand, tandem breastfeeding is taxing. My body works that much harder to make milk. I get that much less sleep. Sometimes I'm touched out, and I just have to say no to the preschooler, and she has a meltdown. And I feel horrible, because I've just denied her something she believes is essential, and something that is an integral part of her relationship with me.
 
Many people tell me to wean my older nursling, or at least night wean, especially since my sleep is so poor. If that is a mother's choice, more power to her. I do not have the desire to make my child wean. I feel bad enough when I wave her off - sometimes pry her off - during the day and occasionally at night. 

I love to breastfeed my children. I love the connection. I love the security. I love the superpower-like feeling of nourishing and comforting a child with my body's natural abilities. I'm of the mindset that I absolutely will not make one of my children wean without absolute necessity. I will also be devastated when they wean. I love breastfeeding, even though it's hard.
 
There are always a few technical questions when it comes to tandem breastfeeding. How did I know the baby got enough? Did I make the older nursling wait her turn? How do I physically nurse them both, like am I an expert Tetris player? What about sharing illnesses? And the list goes on. 

First of all, there are a lot of resources available to assuage a mother's concerns, like La Leche League (LLL) meetings, and a book put out by LLL called Adventures in Tandem Nursing: Breastfeeding During Pregnancy and Beyond by Hilary Flower. 

Here are some of my responses:
 
  • As for making sure the baby is fed, many will say, "feed the baby first," but I say follow the advice for any breastfeeding mother regarding making sure her baby is fed. I don't make the older child wait unless I'm feeling overwhelmed. That has nothing to do with tandem breastfeeding and everything to do with hormones, and if she weren't 4.5 (like if she were just a toddler), I'd probably be more inclined to not make her wait.
 
  • I do typically make her jump on second, though, for logistical purposes. It's usually easier to get the baby into position and let her figure out how she's going to nurse around him. This has gotten trickier as he's gotten bigger (we definitely cannot tandem in a chair anymore; I usually choose the couch). When he was small, I could cradle them both, with him laying in her lap. Now I can barely cradle her at all because she's grown so much, so he gets my lap, and she gets the "football hold," if she's laying down. If somehow she got on first and he decides he just has to nurse NOW, which is a theme these days, he gets the football hold. She won't tolerate him on her anymore. In bed, she usually climbs on top of me while he lays next to me.
 
  • Finally, as far as illness, we haven't had to deal with thrush, but I'd probably do assigned breasts for that, and all the other stuff--well, we all have the same germs because we live together! Their new thing is to jump on the other side as soon as the other child is done, anyway.
 
So, is tandem breastfeeding easy? No, except when I can take down two cranks at the same time...then it's easier than the alternative.
 
Is tandem breastfeeding for everyone? Nope. Aside from determination and patience, it takes a true desire to do it.
 
Is tandem breastfeeding worth it? When it's good, it's great. And for me, the good far outweighs everything else.
 
 
Thank you to Katie for sharing her update on their breastfeeding journey today <3 I hope it has touched you and inspired you in some way, and that you will take heart and courage in your own breastfeeding (and maybe tandem nursing!) journey.
 
Katie Newton is an alumni mom from our Fall 2011 and Spring 2015 Classes.  She and her husband have four children.  See more of Katie's "random thoughts and mutterings" by visiting her blog,
 
UPCOMING EVENTS
Phoenix La Leche League: Live, Latch, Love
As part of the LLL area conference
August 26th, 5-7 PM
Embassy Suites Biltmore
 
La Leche League Conference
August 26-28, 2016
Embassy Suites Biltmore

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
 
Disclaimer: 
The material included in this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and related videos contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of Birthing From Within or The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of Birthing From Within, The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.
 
Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson

 

Breastfeeding benefits the whole family

Posted on August 20, 2016 at 3:05 PM Comments comments (0)
What a perfect picture for today...because on Monday, I get to share Katie's story in our next installment of "In Their Own Words".

One of the amazing benefits of breastfeeding is that the mother creates oxytocin, the hormone of social relationships. Not only does it create calm for the mother and the nursling; it actually has the potential to create calm in the entire space they occupy.

For more reading on oxytocin, click HERE for an article from Scientific American.


In Their Own Words: Tanya + Tandem Nursing

Posted on August 19, 2016 at 9:39 AM Comments comments (0)
"In Their Own Words" is a blog series we share to bring you "real life" experiences, written by other mothers about their families.  Would you like to share your story? Please email me at krystyna{at}sweetpeabirths{dot}com to get started.

Breastfeeding Series: In Their Own Words on the Sweet Pea Births blog...Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
Before I had children, I thought that tandem nursing was something a mother did with twins, or triplets, etc. Little did I know! 

After my first daughter was born, I went from thinking I would just nurse until she was one, to feeling sad that she self-weaned at 22 months while I was pregnant with my second daughter. I never knew how much I wanted to tandem nurse until I wasn’t able to do it. 

When I became pregnant with my son, I thought I might get the chance for tandem this time around. However, my second daughter self-weaned at 17 months. I felt this was far too early and was even more disappointed (Though the nipple aversion was getting pretty difficult!). 

My son was born when my second daughter was 23 months and to my surprise, 6 weeks later she decided to re-latch while in the bath tub with me one day. From then on she wanted to nurse at least 3 times a day. 

I was blown away! I had never heard of a former nursling re-latching. I proceeded to join an online tandem nursing group because I was unable to find much help at my normal breastfeeding group regarding tandem nursing. 

Breastfeeding Series: In Their Own Words on the Sweet Pea Births blog...Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
So here I was with my amazing tandem nursing that I had always wanted and I was MISERABLE!!!  It was so difficult because not only did I have an infant who was waking about 3 times a night to nurse, but now I had a 2-year-old who magically started waking up to nurse. There were many nights where I fell asleep with them hanging off me and my nipples just felt stretched to the limits.

My 2-year-old wanted to nurse almost as much as my infant did many days, and in the books I read there was no discussion about this behavior.  I went to my Le Leche League group and they suggested different ways of setting nursing limits. 

Slowly I began working on nursing limits with her, and over the course of a year-long tandem journey, I was able to get a few limits set. However, breastfeeding had become so much more of a struggle than I had ever experienced in my 4+ years of nursing.  I had always just followed my children’s cues and we seemed to have an unspoken understanding of one another when it came to nursing. 

This tension and dislike for nursing was uncharted territory for me and I began feeling such guilt. Guilt that I no longer understood my daughter. Guilt that I wasn’t having the same positive nursing experience with her that I had the first time around. Guilt that I was letting myself become so burnt out and stressed that I wasn’t being the mommy that I wanted to be for any of my children.

Breastfeeding Series: In Their Own Words on the Sweet Pea Births blog...Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonI think in hindsight, I got caught up in my head thinking I should be able to handle more because I have been through breastfeeding struggles. I had gone to classes and learned so much about breastfeeding. I was a seasoned mother according to most, and I felt that I should be able to handle so much more than when I was a brand new mom with a newborn. 

But...I was a sleep deprived mom with a husband working out of town. He was only home 4-7 days out of the month from the time our son was 6 weeks until he was 5 months and then again from 11-13months.  So I was a single, tandem-nursing, homeschooling mom of 3 during the week and a basket case during the one or two days my husband would come home.  My adrenaline kept me going through the week, but I would collapse many a Saturday either emotionally or physically (or both). 

Breastfeeding Series: In Their Own Words on the Sweet Pea Births blog...Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson

The truth is that at any stage of parenting it can get so hard and overwhelming and out of control. It is OK to ask for help! It is OK to complain to others! It is OK for things to not be OK!  I reached out to a few moms toward the end of my tandem nursing journey and complained that my almost 3-year-old was acting out so much more, regressing in her behavior, I was sleep deprived, I was resenting having to nurse two children…and you know what they told me…

It is OK to stop when the breastfeeding relationship is not working for both. At first I scoffed because “hey…this was my job. I don’t get to say that I AM tired of it. I have to wait until SHE weans, right?!?”

This is the biggest misconception I have felt and have heard others talk about. Now two months after our tandem nursing journey has ended I see that not only do I have a better relationship with my three-year-old but she has an amazing bond with her brother because of that tandem nursing. 

She is NOT damaged because I initiated weaning. She is thriving immensely! She is now potty trained (which was near impossible while she was nursing-she wanted no part of it), she is once again sleeping through the night, she has stopped doing the baby talk she had been doing AND we get to have a new way to have that special time together (which is a great thing for the middle child of the family). 

I am beyond grateful to have been able to extend my nursing journey through tandem nursing. I was able to nurse my two younger children together through the flu this past winter and they recovered far quicker than any of their friends (some who had to be hospitalized for dehydration). 

I am thankful that tandem nursing provided an easier transition for my middle child from baby of the family to big sister. But most of all I am thankful for the lesson I learned. 

I had a preconceived notion of how my nursing journey was supposed to go: I was supposed to happily tandem nurse until my middle child easily weaned herself.  I learned that just because that was not how it went, it did not make me less of a mother or her nursing experience less positive or less beneficial. It has to be a balance, just like everything in life.

Thank you to TANYA for sharing about her tandem breastfeeding journey today <3 I hope it has touched you and inspired you in some way, and that you will take heart and courage in your own breastfeeding journey.

UPCOMING EVENTS
Phoenix La Leche League: Live, Latch, Love
As part of the LLL area conference
August 26th, 5-7 PM
Embassy Suites Biltmore
 
La Leche League Conference
August 26-28, 2016
Embassy Suites Biltmore

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
Disclaimer: 
The material included in this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and related videos contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

Abundance, Full and Ever Flowing

Posted on August 19, 2016 at 12:01 AM Comments comments (0)
Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
Photo by Erin Rudd PhotographyStyling by Modern Mommy BoutiqueImage Design by Amy Latek

One of my favorite reads last year was Sarah Buckley's "Gentle Birth, Gentle Mothering". It totally brought together so many bits and pieces that I have learned over this 12 year journey of being pregnant five times, birthing four times, and mothering our four growing sweet peas.  

This quote is one of my favorites, and encompasses so much of what I love about being a mother and the joy go being able to breastfeed our children.  I hope you enjoy it, too!

UPCOMING EVENTS:
Phoenix La Leche League: Live, Latch, Love
As part of the LLL area conference
August 26th, 5-7 PM
Embassy Suites Biltmore
 
La Leche League Conference
August 26-28, 2016
Embassy Suites Biltmore

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
Disclaimer: 
The material included in this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and related videos contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

Q&A with SPB: How does finger-feeding work?

Posted on August 16, 2016 at 2:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Today's Q&A with SPB might be helpful to families who are anxious to avoid "nipple confusion", something that makes it harder for babies to breastfeed when they have had an early introduction to bottle feeding.

Instead of supplemental feeding of breastmilk or formula with a bottle, this technique is one of the feeding strategies that a family might want to try in order to feed baby and keep things happy at the breast.

Here is our Q&A with SPB question of the week, answered by our friend Michelle Hottya the IBCLC over at The Milk Spot.














Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa,
If you should have questions about today's information, be sure to reach out to your local IBCLC for help.  You can find one in your area by visiting www.ilca.org.

I hope you enjoyed and learned something from today's special Breastfeeding Edition of Q&A with SPB.  We'll be back next week with another installment with the IBCLCs from the Arizona Breastfeeding Center!


Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa,

Do you have a question for the IBCLCs this month? 
Be sure to leave a comment so we can have them answer it for you.

UPCOMING EVENT 
Phoenix La Leche League: Live, Latch, Love
As part of the LLL area conference
August 26th, 5-7 PM
Embassy Suites Biltmore
 
La Leche League Conference
August 26-28, 2016
Embassy Suites Biltmore


Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa,

Disclaimer: 
The material included in this video is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The viewer should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and video contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

In Their Own Words: Tanya...Part 1

Posted on August 15, 2016 at 12:39 PM Comments comments (0)
"In Their Own Words" is a blog series we share to bring you "real life" experiences from other mothers and their families.  Would you like to share your story? Please email me at [email protected] to get started.

.
As a mother to two girls I feel even more of a responsibility to normalize breastfeeding. My amazing mother did that for me and I am forever grateful. I grew up knowing that breastfeeding was a wonderful way to nourish and bond with your baby. 

From the moment I knew I wanted to be a mom, I knew I would breastfeed. So imagine my surprise when I have my first daughter and suddenly I felt an overwhelming embarrassment to nurse in public…WITH A NURSING COVER even. 

There was many a time I went to nurse her in my car or even nursed her in a store bathroom (not my finest hour)!!! To this day I am not even sure where this feeling came from because I was never the victim of shaming from another person while breastfeeding. I imagine it all comes from society’s perception of breastfeeding. 

Thankfully, I had joined Mercy Gilbert’s breastfeeding group and slowly my embarrassment began to turn into pride. By the time I finished Krystyna and Bruss’ Bradley Class in the Spring of 2013, I felt like a superhero of sorts for all the amazing benefits I had provided for my daughter and was going to give my new baby.


I went from not wanting anyone to see me breastfeed with my first daughter (the only picture I have is from the hospital), to embracing the wonderful bond breastfeeding brings and doing so in pictures.

Photo shoot for social media
Photo shoot for social media
Photo by Erin Rudd Photography; Set at Modern Mommy Boutique
Photo shoot for social media
Photo by Erin Rudd Photography; Styling by Modern Mommy Boutique
Photo shoot for social media
Family time
Family time
Family time
2-year-old T nursing her baby Cinderella while I nurse baby K; Photo by Knit Together Photography
Family time
Tandem nursing
Tandem nursing
Nursing K at 3 years and C at 1 year
Extended breastfeeding
My current nursling, baby C – almost 15 months
Extended breastfeeding






































































Today I have been breastfeeding or pregnant (or breastfeeding while pregnant) for 5 ½ years. My greatest accomplishment so far is seeing my daughters “nurse” their babies. It shows me that I have been that role model for them to show them that breastfeeding is normal and beautiful and even difficult at times. 

When my 5-year-old daughter tells me how she needs to nurse her 2-year-old doll or my 3-year-old daughter says “I nurse my baby, mama!” that is simply music to my ears. I started out my nursing journey hoping I could make it to one year and hoping I wouldn’t offend anybody if I had to nurse in public. 

Now, I have proudly nursed one child to 22 months, another to 3 years and am currently nursing my almost 15-month old son until our nursing journey comes to an end. Furthermore, I nurse in public wherever I need to, sometimes with a cover, sometimes without; and sometimes while baby-wearing. 

My hope is that I not only provide my daughters and son with a positive view of breastfeeding, but also inspire a new mom to feel like she is a superhero of sorts when breastfeeding; because it is hard, it is exhausting, it is amazing, it is powerful, it is rewarding, it is blissful, it is depressing, it is courageous, it is painful, it is empowering, but most importantly, it requires a village in order to be successful. 

Whether it be family members (I am so lucky that my parents and in-laws where both a tremendous help), a group or class (both life savers for me), a friend, relative, doctor….it takes a village to make breastfeeding successful. And I am forever grateful for the confidence my village gave me.



Thank you to Tanya for sharing her breastfeeding journey today <3 I hope it has touched you and inspired you in some way, and that you will take heart and courage in your own breastfeeding journey.

UPCOMING EVENTS
Phoenix La Leche League: Live, Latch, Love
As part of the LLL area conference
August 26th, 5-7 PM
Embassy Suites Biltmore
 
La Leche League Conference
August 26-28, 2016
Embassy Suites Biltmore

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson

Disclaimer: 
The material included in this video is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The viewer should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and video contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

0