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Sweet Pea Births

Chandler, Arizona

Sweet Pea Births

...celebrating every swee​t pea their birth

Blog

Q&A with SPB: What do you feed your baby after breastfeeding?

Posted on November 15, 2016 at 9:56 AM Comments comments (0)


Q: What do you feed your baby after breastfeeding?

A: Anything healthy!!! 











Bear in mind that the transition from breastfeeding to solids is a gradual one.  Start with the mindset that "Food before one is just for fun!"  Your body is wonderfully equipped to nourish your baby and help them grow tremendously through their first birthday.  As long as your baby is peeing, pooping, and reaching their developmental milestones, then your breastmilk is doing the job of nourishing your Sweet Pea and helping them thrive.  If you are having your doubts, schedule a visit with a local International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) to see if they can help you reach your breastfeeding goals.

So how does the transition happen?

Typically, we start to replace one feed at a time with solids.  Start by offering the breast first, so that you know your baby is getting some nourishment.  Then offer them the solid food of the day.  Many people start with vegetables first and then move onto fruits.  Then offer the breast again after the feeding session to fill up any space that might be left in the tummy.  Try not be offended if your Sweet Pea turns away...it just means that your efforts to feed solids were a success!!

The transition from exclusively breastfed to eating solids is a gradual one for most families.  You alone know when you are ready to night wean, then take away feeds throughout the day until you are left with an occasional nursing session at waking or before bedtime.  Rest assured that I do not know anyone who was still breastfeeding their college-bound child!

Once your baby is weaned from the breast, they simply need water.  You do not have to feel pressured to continue on with another animal's milk for drinking.  If you want to avoid other dairy foods altogether, there are many food based sources of calcium.  Check out healthaliciousness.com for three different lists of calcium-rich foods: Top 10 Foods, 33 Vegetables, and 17 Fruits.

More about solids:
One of by-products of Bradley training is that our couples are much more aware (if they weren't already) that our body and our baby are what we eat. A healthy diet is one of the cornerstones of a healthy mom, healthy baby pregnancy. 

Once you are used to eating a whole food diet, picking up a box of baby cereal and reading the ingredients might be a scary proposition!!  Here are some sites that have helpful information about introducing solids that skip over the baby cereal and go straight to whole food:


  • Baby-Led Weaning website teaches parents how to feed solids without making purees or buying jar food - simply whole food from you to your baby

  • Annabel Karmel - books available at Modern Mommy Boutique in Chandler if you are local to Phoenix

See our post HERE that answers the question: How do I know my Sweet Pea is ready for solids?

It is exciting to see your baby learn to eat other foods! You can read our food chronicle with Otter HERE.

Disclaimer: 
The material included in this video is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The viewer should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and video contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.
 

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson








Q&A with SPB: How do I know my Sweet Pea is ready for solids?

Posted on November 8, 2016 at 10:50 AM Comments comments (0)

Q: How do I know if my Sweet Pea is ready for solids?

A: There are four things to look for!!




First of all, you want to be sure that your baby is interested...they WANT to eat.  You will know by their behaviors... they are interested, tracking food with their eyes when you eat, and/or  they reaching for the food around them!! It has nothing to do with what your family or friends have to say about it or what the people in your meet-up groups are doing with their Sweet Peas who are in a similar age bracket.  You and your baby know best!!  If you are concerned about your baby's development, then please reach out to your trusted care provider and see what they have to say on the matter.

After you decide that your baby is ready, look for these next three signals of food readiness.  We learned these points over the years of attending La Leche League meetings, Our family waited for these to be true before we started offering our sweet peas "table food":

  1. Sweet Pea can get themselves into a seated position and hold themselves there without being propped up by pillows, chairs, other people, etc.
  2. Sweet Pea has developed their pincer grip...in other words my breasts and the back of my arms were black+blue from being pinched. What it also means is that our Sweet Pea was now able to hold food on their own by grasping it between their thumb and their pointer finger.
  3. Sweet Pea has lost their tongue-thrust reflex and could move food to the back of their mouth without choking on it.  The tongue-thrust reflex is great for exclusive breastfeeding.  Until the Sweet Pea can differentiate between using it to breastfeed and not using it when they are going to have solids, then all you are going to get is solid food everywhere except inside your Sweet Pea.

Personally, I am not a fan of commercial baby cereals that are full of ingredients that I cannot pronounce without breaking down every syllable.  Rest assured, choosing the alternatives are not as time-consuming as you would imagine...

Here are some sites that have helpful information about introducing solids:


  • Baby-Led Weaning website teaches parents how to feed solids without making purees or buying jar food - simply whole food from you to your baby

  • Annabel Karmel - books available at Modern Mommy Boutique in Chandler if you are local to Phoenix

I hope this helps answer the question of about knowing if your Sweet Pea is ready for solids.  

Ready to read more?
You can read our food chronicle with Otter HERE.

Q&A with SPB: What do I feed my Sweet Pea after breastfeeding? HERE

Disclaimer: 
The material included in this video is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The viewer should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and video contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.
 
Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, 

An Inside Look: Blue Russ Holistic Health Coaching

Posted on June 2, 2013 at 12:22 AM Comments comments (1)

I am pleased to introduce you to Blue Russ today.  She is a certified Holistic Health Coach, trained at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, where she studied over 100 dietary theories and a wide range of coaching techniques. She is your calm, gentle guide, supporting you to achieve your goals with confidence and grace. No counting calories or grams of nutrients. No judgment. No food is off limits. No deprivation. She believes that we have all the wisdom and healing power we need. The best healers are the ones that enable us to reawaken it. She is ready to guide you to reawaken your power.

Blue is also a homebirth mother of two with a passion for health and life. She's been told it is contagious.

Learn more and sign up for tips and recipes at www.blueruss.com. You can also follow her on Facebook at Blue Russ Health Coaching and Twitter  @BlueRussHealth


How did you get started in the field of nutrition?
I've been fascinated by food since I was first allowed to cook as a child. The endless flavor combinations! As a teenager, I was without dairy for a year when my family lived in Africa. When we returned, I went straight for a glass of milk and immediately my stomach cramped up. I had considered this sensation normal as a child and it was then I made the connection between food and health. I went on to experiment with different foods and learn more about the connection between what I ate and how I felt. When I was pregnant the first time, I learned even more, reading every book on pregnancy health I could get my hands on. Equally strong passions for me are health and social justice. It is a clear calling for me to be a healer and my aspirations are to change the world one mother at a time.

What is your favorite part of what you do?
I have so many favorite parts! The spark in a client's eye as they articulate exactly what their next step is, the one they are ready for, the one that will change everything. The relief in a mother's voice when her children or husband actually enjoy their green veggies. Helping women connect with each other, sparking lively, life-changing conversation. The learning and growing I experience with every single session and class. I could go on and on…

How does a family participate in your services?
My specialty is moms: Fertility, pregnancy, motherhood and grandmotherhood. I have also worked with couples, which is wonderful, but I primarily work with moms. Moms tend to be the leaders of the family and over time everyone follows their healthy example.

My philosophy is that guilt, blame, shame, calorie counting and strict dieting all lead to needless suffering. It is through understanding and honoring ourselves that we make quality choices. I see my role as facilitating and strengthening the connection a mother has with her inner wisdom.

In practical terms, I offer one-on-one health coaching, cooking classes, workshops and online programs. All are designed to help moms reach a higher level of health and joy in their lives. The transformations I witness are beyond belief - I've supported women through ending their sugar addiction, taking control of their children's health, losing weight, changing careers, finally finding true love and much more.

My favorite is working with women one-on-one in my 6-month program. This gives her the chance to take it step by step, avoid overwhelm and we have time to explore all areas of her life. I consider primary foods to be what's going on her life, not what she eats. Primary foods include relationships, physical activity, career and spirituality. If these areas of life are not simultaneously addressed, even the most perfect diet will do nothing to improve her health.

How can you help a family when they are expecting?
I love working with pregnant women! They are motivated to be healthy and their choices truly do effect the next generation. When she feels her best, and her primary foods are in order, baby gets the best start. I offer a variety of programs from a one week whole foods cleanse that is safe for pregnancy and nursing to a 6 week group program to a 6 month one-on-one program.

Do you offer any classes for postpartum health?
Yes! In addition to my other program options, I have a new offering just for the postpartum period! I call it "Eat Well for Two" and it involves a day of food prep, recipes, pantry make-over and health strategy session, all in the comfort of the new mother’s home.

How do you coach a family through first foods and starting solids?
There are a variety of ways to introduce solids into a baby’s diet. Each family is different and I work with their unique situation to discover what is best. In general, breastfeeding for as long as possible and introducing foods at about 6 months is best. Most babies experiment with food long before they are ready to eat it. I say let them at it! I see my role as assisting parents in listening to their intuition and baby’s cues in order to confidently introduce foods. I offer information and recommendations but ultimately it has to feel right within the family!

How can we get our family to eat healthy greens that we know we are supposed to eat - the variety and the scope can be so intimidating!
So glad you asked about greens! I am passionately in love with greens. This was not always the case, but experimenting with recipes to find the ones I enjoy has been the key. I love to spread the green joy. In fact, I offer an entire week of recipes and support through my online program, “A Week of Greens.” I worked with a mom who used to choke down spinach because she knew it was good for her. Now she actually looks forward to delicious salads and cooked greens every day! The next Week of Greens will be offered in November.

Is there anything else our families should know about your services, and the classes you offer?
I am passionate about helping moms live a vibrant life. Being a mother may be the most challenging job in the world, but it is also the most enjoyable when mom is at her best - not to mention the ripple effect into the next generation and the planet! It's not about guilt, it's about power. We have the power to make the world better than we found it!

I encourage all moms to go to my website, check me out and sign up for my e-newsletter to get tips, recipes and event invitations.
Right now I am offering a free menu planner to all new subscribers, available immediately when you sign up!

When a mom feels ready to take steps to improve her life, I am ready to support her with a free health strategy session that can be done by phone, Skype or in person at my Phoenix and Chandler offices.

Do you have on-line options for clients who are not able to join a class in person?
I offer four different programs online throughout the year. The next one starts on June 10 and is called “Vegan for a Week.” Having a menu plan, recipes, shopping list and group support will go a long way to increase participants’ vegetable intake. I’m not 100% vegan myself nor am I interested in pushing any single diet, but I do think that there are several dietary theories that are worth exploring, including the vegan diet.

I also offer webinars from time to time. The best way to be up to date on my online offerings is to sign up for my newsletter at

Thank you for taking the time to give us an Inside Look, Blue.  I really enjoyed learning more about how a health coach works.  I just had my first session and it was transformational!  Anyone can take advantage of a complimentary session with Blue by contacting her to set a date for your personal health strategy session.

Phone:  480.273.6140
               
Have you ever considered a health coach? What would you get help with?
 Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 
*I think* that the amount of traffic you so generously generate has led to a lot of spam posting.  In an effort to keep the spam to a minimum, I am taking the time to moderate comments now.
 
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


Food chronicle: Angelika ~ Week 8

Posted on July 18, 2012 at 11:53 AM Comments comments (0)
This is the eighth and final installment in my Introduction to Solids series.  I am journaling about our experience with baby feeding since we have the unique opportunity to share this with our students and readers as we start the process of weaning our youngest child.  This is not medical advice, nor is it a schedule to be followed.  It is simply our choice for our baby and the first time we have done what is gaining popularity as “baby-led weaning”.

Click on these links for Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Week 4, Week 5, Week 6 and Week 7.   
 
Click here for a link to the stain fighting tips shared by my facebook friends.  Can you add more the list?  Please do so in the comments and I will move them into the body of the post as time allows.  

This past week we introduced our first “official” protein – pinto beans.  We started out by giving the baby the broth from the cooked beans.  She gobbled it up!  The very first day I gave her one bean to see how she would eat it – it went straight into the mouth and she ate it without choking.   

The next day, I tried to give her some broth and baby shook her head with an emphatic no!  I gave her some beans from my plate and that is exactly what she wanted.  Now we have another pinto bean fan in the house!  We are going to stick with pinto beans for another week, and then we will introduce black beans.   

Another new food: I gave the baby lightly toasted bread.  Up to now, I would give her the hard crust on Italian bread or a hard dinner roll to gnaw on.  Since she has done so well with eating and not choking, I decided to experiment with a piece of toast.  After toasting, I sliced it up into finger-width slices.  All four pieces got eaten – rice bread was a yes this week!   

I also had another baking day.  I used farmer’s market zucchini and replaced the eggs in the recipe with flax seed.  Baby continues to devour this bread!  Interestingly, she doesn’t like the crust on this and sucks out the soft center.  She spits out the crust when she has eaten out the center.   

We also confirmed that baby likes riper bananas.  If the skin is still yellow, she will suck on the pieces and then spit them out.  When the skin is starting to get brown spots on it, she will actually consume (read: devour) the banana.  There are no pieces left on the tray or on the chair when the banana is ripe.   

One adjustment we made was feeding her slices or pieces of fruit again, instead of whole fruit.  She seemed to lose interest in eating a half an apple, or the whole peaches and plums she was eating with supervision.  Since I couldn’t imagine that she lost her sweet tooth, I started cutting the fruit up into small pieces again – that did the trick!  She enjoyed the fruit again.  I wish we could understand what was going on in their little minds that affect their preferences!   

Our surprise this week was that the baby grabbed a piece of chicken off of one of our other kiddo’s plate.  We took it away, and she reached for it again!  I let her keep it to see what she would do with it.  I don’t know that she ate it, because there were lots of little chicken pieces to pick up.  Her interest seemed to be ripping the food apart with her two little teeth!    

I will close out this series of posts with the following thoughts: 
  • Sometimes it takes more than one introduction for a baby to eat a food.  Be persistent and offer it to them and eventually they will take a taste.  
  • Keep the table a happy place!  Healthy eating habits have a lifetime of benefits.  Knowing that her nutritional needs are still being met when she nurses lets us keep the introductions happy and we view any eating that actually happens as a bonus.  Force feeding may have negative effects down the line (control issues, breaking the “satiety button” that can lead to a lifetime of overeating – read more here
  • We like that feeding baby whole foods is cost effective.  One clear advantage is that we have a “no pressure” attitude about food.  There is no grocery money going to waste, so our baby isn’t being force fed to keep money from being thrown away.  Any food she doesn’t eat is saved to be “mommy leftovers” later.   

Lastly, sometimes a child will reject foods that they used to like.  This can be normal.  Consider a look at these factors to decide if your baby needs to be seen by their care provider:  Are they running a fever?  How is their energy level?  How are they sleeping?  Are there any other signs that they are “off”?  If you decide that something is amiss, then maybe that warrants a little more exploration.   

In our experience, we found that the foods our son Bruss was rejecting were the foods that he ended up being allergic to.  I was so grateful for trusting my instincts that he was eating other things so he was okay and we did not need to “force feed” him.  I continue to trust his instincts about what he can and cannot eat, and he continues to grow and thrive so he is definitely eating the foods that are right for him.  This does not mean that we are permissive - we have healthy food choices available for them to pick from.  Treats are a separate issue and they know they can have them after they have eaten a good meal.  

I will be continuing our food journal for my own records since we have a history of interesting food allergies in our family.  We will keep introducing other fruits and vegetables until October since I like to keep our children vegetarian until they are a year old.  After that, we will start introducing some fish and meats, as well as eggs and dairy.  If you are curious about when other foods are introduced, we can correspond via email: [email protected]   

Food Journal 
 Tuesday, July 10 
 Breakfast: Banana 
 Snack: Apple slices 
 Lunch: Plum, sweet potato, yams 
 Dinner: Patty Pan (squash)   

 Wednesday, July 11 
 Breakfast: ½ Banana, 1 strawberry 
 Snack: Veggie straws 
 Lunch: Patty Pan (squash), Pinto Bean broth 
 Dinner: Plum, peas   

 Thursday, July 12 
 Breakfast: Banana 
 Snack: Veggie straws 
 Lunch: Steamed carrots, ½ plum 
 Dinner: Peas, bread crust   

 Friday, July 13 
 Breakfast: Peach & plum pieces 
 Lunch: Peas, patty pan slices 
 Dinner: Zucchini bread   

 Saturday, July 14 
 Breakfast: Banana, Peach pieces 
 Lunch: Peas 
 Dinner: nursed only   

 Sunday, July 15 
 Breakfast: Pancake, Banana, 3 bites of oatmeal 
 Lunch: Zucchini bread 
 Dinner: nursed only   

 Monday, July 16 
 Breakfast: Banana, Rice bread 
 Lunch: Veggie straws, waffle potato fries, 1 grilled chicken nugget(!!) 
 Dinner: Avocado   

Link List: 
 Appetite regulation: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3170240/  

Disclaimer:  
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson  The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  
This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®

Food chronicle: Angelika ~ Week 7

Posted on July 10, 2012 at 5:00 PM Comments comments (0)
This is the seventh and penultimate installment in my Introduction to Solids series.  I am not sure how many more "aha" moments I am going to have going forward, so I think that I will keep one more week of notes to post and then move onto something else.  I am open to ideas, so let me know!  I will also count on our students to keep my ideas fresh :)

I am journaling about our experience with baby feeding since we have the unique opportunity to share this with our students and readers as we start the process of weaning our youngest child.  This is not medical advice, nor is it a schedule to be followed.  It is simply our choice for our baby and the first time we have done what is gaining popularity as “baby-led weaning”. 

Click on these links for Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Week 4, Week 5 and Week 6

Thank you to everyone who sent me your stain fighting ideas.  I will take some time later this week to compile all the info and include it in next week’s post.  I felt kind of dumb – I use one of the most obvious ones (sun drying) for our light colored clothing…I had never thought to apply it to our other clothes! 

This week I had a little light bulb go off.  Angelika really likes plums…so much so that she reaches for them when I am putting them in the grocery cart.  I remembered that one of our students had been told to give their baby prune juice for constipation.  I made the jump from prune juice being good for the digestive functions…to prunes to plums…and since that little “light bulb moment” we have been giving Angelika a plum to eat on a daily basis.  No more days without a bowel movement since that happy “discovery”.  I am so happy her body has responded well to this food choice. 

I am still enjoying how easy it is to feed Baby when you are making whole food choices instead of taking the time to make purees and then mix them with baby cereals.  This week we were baking cookies, so I threw the sweet potato and the yam in the oven and used the same heat to cook the tubers.  Peas and carrots are easily steamed – it only takes a few minutes to boil water (even faster at altitude – yeah!). 

  • Side notes:  Now that Angelika is used to steamed carrots, she no longer likes to chew on them as teethers.  We think that her favorite vegetable is peas – those always disappear the fastest and she has yet to turn them down. 

This week, the new foods were strawberries and a squash variety we picked up at the Payson Farmer’s Market.  They are called a “Patty Pan”, also known as “Scallop” squash. 

I was nervous to try the strawberries because although they are not technically a citrus fruit, some children have reactions to them and La Leche League recommends waiting until babies are 12 months to introduce them (see this page).  I am not sure what it is about them that causes the reaction – here is the allergy information I found poking around the internet.  

Ysabella gave her a strawberry the other day when I wasn’t looking and then she told me about it.  Thankfully, there was no allergic reaction! I decided to “officially” introduce them since baby is reaching for them when I serve them to our older kiddos.   We tried a few more pieces the next day and so far, so good. My plan is to give them at 2-3 day intervals to allow Angelika’s body the time to process all the seeds that are on the outside of the fruit. 


The other new food was new for all of us.  The farmer we bought them from called them Patty Pans.  Brussito was very interested in trying them, so we bought some.  (As you can see from the picture, another name for them, "Flying Saucers", is appropriate, too!  Might be a fun way to get the boys to keep eating them.)

The farmer told us they are extremely versatile: they can be baked, sautéed, fried or grilled.  You can slice them or stuff them.  We opted for a thin slice, a little olive oil, a touch of salt and then we put them out on the barbeque grill with the meat we made for the family.  The Patty Pans were delicious!  Angelika enjoyed them, as did the rest of the family. 

I love introducing foods to Angelika in the summer.  There are so many fruits to serve without having to prepare them, other than to peel them.  We are feeding her apples, bananas, peaches and plums on a regular basis.  Now we have strawberries to work into the mix.  I am thinking that we are good for the upcoming week and that we are not going to try anything new. 

This week will continue serving Angelika the Patty Pans that were left over (we cooked three different varieties: yellow, green and white – they all tasted the same to me!), and we have more sweet potatoes, yams, peas and carrots to prepare.  With the variety of foods that she is eating, I find that baking one large yam and one large sweet potato pretty much lasts the week. 

Next on our fruit list are grapes and cherries, but since those take a little more preparation, we may try another veggie next…maybe eggplant or green beans.

What has been your experience with introducing solids?  Did you discover any food allergies in the process?

Interested in reading more about our introduction to solids?  Click on these links for Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Week 4, Week 5 and Week 6.

FOOD JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 3rd
Breakfast:
Snack:
Lunch: Peas, Potatoes
Snack:
Dinner:
 (No computer day – journaling fail!)

Wednesday, July 4th
Breakfast: Pancake: Bob’s Red Mill GF Mix, rice milk, flax seed, banana
Snack: Peach
Lunch: slept through it
Snack: Veggie straws
Dinner: Sweet Potato, Yam
BM – Yes

Thursday, July 5th
Breakfast: pancake, apple
Lunch: Peas, carrots, potatoes
Snack: Veggie straws
Dinner: Peas, carrots, potatoes, ice cream
BM – Yes

Friday, July 6
Breakfast: strawberry (½ berry), ½ banana, apple, pancakes
Lunch: plum, sweet potato, yam
Dinner: Sweet potato, yam, veggie straws, tortilla chips
BM – No

Saturday, July 7
Breakfast: Banana, pancakes
Lunch: Plum
Dinner: Sweet potato, Yam, banana
BM – 2

Sunday, July 8  
Breakfast: Banana, pancakes
Lunch: Peas, Veggie straws
Dinner: Peas, sweet potato, yams
BM – 2   Monday, July 9
Breakfast: Banana, graham crackers
Lunch: Strawberries, plum, graham crackers
Snack: Veggie straws
Dinner: Zucchini, avocado, tortilla chips
BM – 2   
 
WEB LINKS 
First Foods: http://www.llli.org/faq/firstfoods.html
Strawberry Allergy: http://strawberryplants.org/2011/03/strawberry-allergy/

Disclaimer:  
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson  The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®. 

Food chronicle: Angelika ~ Week 6

Posted on July 3, 2012 at 4:33 PM Comments comments (1)
Starting solidsThis is the sixth installment in my Introduction to Solids series.  I am journaling about our experience with baby feeding since we have the unique opportunity to share this with our students and readers as we start the process of weaning our youngest child.  This is not medical advice, nor is it a schedule to be followed.  It is simply our choice for our baby and the first time we have done what is gaining popularity as “baby-led weaning”.

Click on these links for Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Week 4 and Week 5.

  What’s new this week: I went back to nursing before meals – I was much happier with the output from Angelika’s digestive tract.  We are about 50/50 with feeding after meals.  It depends on the time of day and what we have going on in our schedules.  If we leave the house right after eating, I still offer breastmilk once we get to our destination – it’s been a yes every time so far.

  Angelika’s body is getting better and better at digesting her food!  We had a “big” day yesterday – her colon cleared out four times!  It was a big confirmation that for Angelika’s system, breastfeeding her before meals is the right thing to do.

  We also added steamed zucchini this week  – they were a big hit!!  Angelika tried grabbing them off of my plate instead of waiting for me to pick them out of the tomatoes and onions in the dish!

  I have noticed that she is more and more interested in food.  I don’t know if her appetite is increasing, or maybe she’s more curious about food.  Anytime someone around her has food in their hand, she reaches for it. 

  As far as food sizes, the only things that are still “small” are the peas.  We have been giving her steamed carrot sticks that she gnaws down herself.  When I cube a potato for her, they are probably ¾ inch cubes.  The zucchini was sliced into ½ inch slices, and then I gave her half of the round slice.  Six weeks into eating true solids, she knows how to mash or bite into her food for her to swallow.

  When we give her fruit, she prefers to take the whole fruit in her hand and gum it.  I give her half of a peeled banana instead of slicing it for her.  She does not eat a plum if it is sliced anymore; same goes for a nectarine.  I have been peeling half of the fruit so that the juicy part is easier to get to, and leaving the skin on the other half so it is easier to grasp (see picture at the top).  She is eating around the centers, and when she gets to the skin-on part of the fruit, she just sucks the fruit until only the skin and the pit are left.  I still sit right next to her with a peeled whole fruit.  No mishaps yet, I just always want to have the safety net.

  She is not doing much with her sippy cup other than to chew on it.  When she does drink water out of the cup, she promptly spits it out.  Her swim teacher would be so proud!  Now if she will only do this in the pool…

  Does anyone have a way to clean peach and banana stains from clothing?  We are down to stripping her before she eats - I am not succeeding at getting the stains out for these fruits...the other fruit she is interested in and that we may try this week once I do a little research is cherries.  My biggest concern is the stain factor!

Any thoughts on introducing solids?
Any stain-fighting tips to share?


PostScript:  It’s been a crazy couple of days and I am finishing this blog post as we eat lunch.  Not something I usually hold with: having electronics at the table during family time!  I am giving baby tortilla chips and peas for lunch.  As we are sitting here, she did a little gag and then threw up some peas that must have gotten stuck.  Now she’s back to eating.  I love watching our kids eat!!  I am forever amazed at how the human body works. 

Meal & Output Journal 

Tuesday, June 26 
2 bm’s: one in the morning, one in the afternoon
Breakfast: Snack: gnawed on an apple, breastmilk
Lunch: slept through it! 
Snack: Peach
Dinner: Sweet potatoes (2 cubes), 2 veggie straws, breastmilk
She refused to eat and fussed until I nursed her – interesting!

Wednesday, June 27
1 bm at lunch time
Breakfast: Banana, 2 GF Puffins cereal squares
Snack: Veggie straws
Lunch: Zucchini - steamed
Dinner: Cucumber slices (2), veggie straws, broccoli spear (not a favorite yet)

Thursday, June 28
1 bm at lunch time
Breakfast: Bananas, nectarine
Lunch: Plum – sucked the flesh from the skin…she prefers this over having it cut up for her
Snack: Tortilla chips
Dinner: slept through it!

Friday, June 29
Breakfast: banana
Lunch: nectarine
Dinner: Peas, carrots

Saturday, June 30
No bm
Breakfast: Banana
Lunch: couple of pieces of potato – more interested in nursing
Snack: Veggie straws
Dinner: Potatoes, peas, carrots
  Feels like more nursing today – not sure if baby is cutting a tooth or maybe feeling constipated?  It might also be that we have been to three group events today and she is craving some mommy-time & reassurance.

Sunday, July 1
1 little bm
Breakfast: pancakes – gluten-free, egg-free, banana
Lunch: Nectarine
Dinner: Veggie sticks

Monday, July 2
4 bms!  2 regular, 2 minis
Breakfast: Pancake
Snack: Apple
Lunch: Peas, carrots, potato, apple
Dinner: Peas, potato

Disclaimer:  
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson  The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®. 

Food Chronicle: Angelika ~ Week 5

Posted on June 26, 2012 at 9:04 AM Comments comments (0)
Bradley baby gnawing on an apple
This is the fifth installment in my Introduction to Solids series.  I am journaling about our experience with baby feeding since we have the unique opportunity to share this with our students and readers as we start the process of weaning our youngest child.  This is not medical advice, nor is it a schedule to be followed.  It is simply our choice for our baby and the first time we have done what is gaining popularity as “baby-led weaning”.

Click on these links for Week 1, Week 2, Week 3 and Week 4.

What’s new since last week:
Pictured above is Angelika sitting up and gnawing on an apple "teether".  It's half of an apple that I have peeled and cored.  This week she started taking bites out of it!  I used to eat them when she was done sucking and gnawing on them - not much left anymore!

Just when I think Angelika’s body is adjusting to eating solids (see our journal below), we had another day without a bowel movement yesterday.  I am probably obsessing too much about this.  I think it’s time for a visit with our chiropractor.

We have had a couple of instances last week where she was thrashing around and being fussy.  Out of curiosity: instead of nursing her, I offered her a veggie straw to gnaw on and the fussiness went away.  I am not sure if she is hungry or teething – another thing to ask our chiropractor about.  I suspect maybe a little bit of both since she has started gumming my breast again…except this time it hurts because her two lower teeth are new and sharp!

One of our new foods this week was a plum.  She loved it!  I was eating one while Angelika was sitting on my lap.  I let her suck on some of it.  Her first reaction was to make a face – it looked like she had eaten something really sour.  Despite that, she reached for it again, and I let her try it again.  This time, she took it out of my hands – and would not give it back!  I struggled to get it back so I could at least remove the pit.  I watched her like a hawk – she took it out of my hands with the peel still on.  (Thinking I was going to be eating the plum, it hadn’t been peeled.)  She did a great job of sucking off all the flesh and leaving the peel behind.  Smart eater!  Phew!  I still have residual fears about choking from our previous experiences with our older children.  Angelika continues to reinforce that our decision to do things differently this time was the right one for our family. 

Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson  The second food I offered was a gluten-free graham cracker.  Not a big hit, but not a no, either.  We may try this one again to see what happens.  I am not to concerned about the grains since I eat plenty of them and I feel confident she is getting her Vitamin B through my breastmilk ("What's In Breastmilk?" Poster).

We revisited the zucchini bread and the avocado.  Both were eaten with no fuss – they are definitely into the rotation!  The zucchini bread did have eggs in it.  We replaced one of the eggs with flax seed.  When we make the recipe again this week, I am going to try replacing two eggs with flax and use only one of the three that is called for to see what happens.  I am a little concerned to be introducing eggs before her first birthday since two of her siblings react to eggs. 

Here are the sources I reference for food introductions since we have a history of food allergies in our family
I also had a couple of meals where I got to eat last week!  If you are a mom to a larger household, you may have experienced this: once you finish serving everyone else, your food is cold, or everyone is finishing up when you are getting started.  We had one meal at home that was perfectly timed so that food was ready all at once and baby was ready to eat…and we all sat around the dinner table together, at the same time – and I ate a meal at the correct temperature, without having to get up from the table. My second “real meal” was a night we went out to dinner with some friends, leaving the older kiddos at home.  Angelika sat in her high chair the whole time, looking like a little doll and behaving like one.  She enjoyed her veggie straws, her peas and her yams; drank a little bit of water – it was amazing!  We dined – and I didn’t nurse her once.  As I write this I am having a pang of bittersweet.  While it is amazing and she is learning and growing, it means that my last nursling is on her way to complete independence and someday in the nearer future than I care to think about, my breastfeeding days will be over. We are still continuing to breastfeed after meals although I am no longer feeding before meals.  Depending on how bowel movements go this week, I may revisit nursing before meals again.  Maybe Angelika needs the laxative effects of breastmilk before and after solids to help get things moving along her intestinal tract. It doesn’t feel like I am nursing as much anymore.  This past week I also logged a few days of breastfeeding just to see how often I was breastfeeding. As it turns out, I am still nursing every 3-4 hours.  What did bear out is that although the frequency was about the same, the time at the breast is definitely much shorter.  Angelika nurses efficiently and then gets back to hanging out with her siblings. Tuesday, June 19 

 BM (bowel movement) in the afternoon 
 Breakfast 
 Lunch 
 Dinner: Sweet potatoes, crackers (2) 
 Did all breastmilk until we saw a BM…this was going on day 5 without any significant output   

Wednesday, June 20 
 Nursed @ 6:15 am; 
 breakfast @ 6:45 Breakfast: ½ banana – A is squishing it first and then she puts it into her mouth – messy! 
 Lunch: Snack: 2 tortilla chips, 4 veggie straws 
 Dinner: Peas, Yams   

Thursday June 21 
 Breakfast: banana – almost a whole one 
 Lunch: slept through 
 Snack: 4 veggie straws 
 Dinner: Yams, peas, veggie straws   

Friday, June 22 
 2 bm’s 
 Breakfast: apples, GF graham crackers 
 Lunch: slept through 
 Snack: 
 Dinner: Peas, Yams   

Saturday, June 23 
 3 bm’s 
 Breakfast: Apple pieces, zucchini bread 
 Lunch: slept thru 
 Snack: Veggie straws, plum 
 Dinner: Peas, Yams   

Sunday, June 24 
 3 bm’s 
 Breakfast: Apple slices 
 Lunch: Banana, carrot teether, veggie straws
 Snack: Tortilla chips (2)
 Dinner: Yams, potatoes, peas, avocado   

Monday, June 25 
 Breakfast: Glutino cracker 
 Lunch: Potato, Sweet potato, yam 
 Dinner: Peas, Yams   

Disclaimer:  
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson  The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®. 

Food Chronicle: Angelika ~ Week 4

Posted on June 20, 2012 at 3:03 AM Comments comments (1)
Food Chronicle: Week 4   

This is the fourth installment in my Introduction to Solids series.  I am journaling about our experience with baby feeding since we have the unique opportunity to share this with our students and readers as we start the process of weaning our youngest child.  This is not medical advice, nor is it a schedule to be followed.  It is simply our choice for our baby and the first time we have done what is gaining popularity as “baby-led weaning”.   

Click on these links for Week 1, Week 2 and Week 3.   

We added bananas on Wednesday – she loved it!  As it happens, our older kiddos like bananas, too, so that was the only opportunity I had to offer it before we went grocery shopping again.  I didn’t offer more avocados like I had intended, and we didn’t do baked apples, either.  It was too darn hot!  Maybe in the fall.   

Angelika is doing great with eating her solids, and she is still nursing like a champ.  I have noticed that during the day, she drains the breast in less than five minutes.  She is much more interested in seeing what her siblings are doing than she is in nursing.  By the same token, she still wants to nurse before and after we spend time in the high chair.  It surprises me, especially when I have seen her consume what seems to be a lot of food for a baby.   

Her new foods were in the grains food group this week.  She LOVED my aunt’s zucchini bread – it disappeared faster than any food to date; and she kept reaching for more.  I was a little hesitant to let her eat this since it is the most ingredients she has had at any one sitting.  However, she enjoyed the taste, got some vegetables into her system, and seemed to have no reactions.   

The second grain we introduced was a round soda cracker.  I am still nervous introducing these hard foods due to our choking incidents with our younger children.  However, I am learning to trust the process: we waited for food readiness to be a developmental step, not a convenience step.  We watched for her to develop the pincer grip and to sit up by herself before feeding her small pieces of food.  Our baby has learned to chew her food first since she started straight with solids, as opposed to learning to swallow food like cereals before learning to chew bigger foods.  In other words, her instinct is to chew what’s in her mouth before she does anything else with the food we feed her.   

Notes:
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonShe doesn’t seem to be affected by gluten yet.  The bread she ate was a baked using a regular wheat flour.  The cracker I gave her is made by one of our favorite gluten-free commercial companies: Glutino.  I will keep her on a gluten-free diet for the most part since that is the way our family rolls. Side note: today was pantry-cleaning day.  We have literally four containers left with wheat products – everything else is gluten-free!   

She went one of her longest stretches without having a bowel movement this past week.  I really hope that she forgives me this part of the chronicle – I wonder if the internet really is forever – I guess we will find out!!   

Anyway, I cut back on the food we were giving her, and stuck with some tried and true foods once the days stretched into three and four.  We stayed with the apples, that are high in fiber and purportedly good to keep the digestive tract going in the right direction.  In reading this blurb , The blurb reads that a lot of the fiber is in the skin – oops.  It may not have been as effective as a “laxative” for her because I am still peeling the apples when I offer them.  I feel there is no need to invite the choking unnecessarily, so for now, I will keep peeling fruits and veggies before feeding them to the baby.   

This is a less crazy week, so I have already baked the sweet potato and yam for the next few days, and I have a butternut squash and some zucchini to cook tomorrow.  Check in next week if you are curious to know how she liked her new vegetables!  

We are also going to see how her digestive tract is working the next few days…I bought some bananas and I have more avocado for this week’s culinary adventures.   

I would love to hear from you – what is your experience with baby-led weaning?  How does it compare with feeding choices you have made for other children?   
 
Food+ Diary 
 Tuesday, June 12 
 Bm in the morning 
 Breakfast: peaches 
 Lunch: apple teether 
 Dinner: banana pieces – 1/3 banana   

 Wednesday, June 13 
 First “solid” poop in the pm 
 Veggie straws in pm   

 Thursday, June 14 
 GREEN bm in the am 
 Breakfast: carrot stick teether 
 Lunch: n/a
 Snack: apple teether; zucchini bread 
 Dinner: peaches, apple slice, gf crackers (2)   

 Friday, June 15 
 No bm 
 Lunch: peaches 
 Dinner: Veggie sticks, Glutino crackers (2)   

 Saturday, June 16 
 No bm 
 Lunch:  Apple, veggie sticks 
 Not a lot of food today – second day of no “regular” morning bowel movement, plus we had several events out of the home.   

 Sunday, June 17 
 No bm 
 Breakfast: Apple pieces 
 Lunch: Apples slices, veggie straws 
 Dinner: Steamed Carrots   

 Monday, June 18 
 Tiny, solid bm – quarter size 
 Breakfast: Apple pieces 
 Lunch: Apples slices, veggie straws 
 Dinner: Steamed Carrots   

Link to apple info:
http://www.everydayhealth.com/digestive-health-pictures/10-foods-that-help-relieve-constipation.aspx#/slide-9

Disclaimer:  
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®. 

Food Chronicle: Angelika ~ Week 3

Posted on June 12, 2012 at 10:22 AM Comments comments (0)
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonPhoto: The last of our peaches...so happy our baby got our home-grown produce!
 
This is the third installment in my Introduction to Solids series.  I am journaling about our experience with baby feeding since we have the unique opportunity to share this with our students and readers as we start the process of weaning our youngest child. 

This is not medical advice, nor is it a schedule to be followed.  It is simply our choice for our baby and the first time we have done what is gaining popularity as “baby-led weaning”.
 
Click on these links for Week 1 and Week 2.
 
There are two benefits I have already noticed from our choice to feed Angelika whole food pieces instead of starting her with cereals and purees.
 
No choking yet:  Babies that learn to eat whole food pieces learn to chew, as opposed to children who start with soft, mushy foods that learn to swallow.  I cannot find the source where I originally read this – it makes so much sense! (When I find it, I will post the link.) 
 
Knowing that I wanted to start her with “true” solids, I waited for some developmental markers to start feeding.  She did not start getting table food until she could get into and stay in a seated position on her own, and I watched for the pincer grip.  As it turns out, she practiced that on me – my bruised breasts and my arms were proof that our baby could probably pinch to grasp food, among other things.

We had scary choking experiences with our other three children – mostly involving things like tortilla chips, which we have a lot of in the southwest!  She grabbed a tortilla chip out of my hand last Wednesday, and managed to eat it without choking.
 
If your child does choke – click here for some visuals with instructions.
 
Less time in the kitchen:  I would spend two days per month preparing vegetable purees when we started feeding our boys.  Baking, steaming, pureeing, freezing, storing…it was time consuming!  As a mother to four kiddos, that is just not a reality right now.  Now I can bake or steam a few things as we make our own food and use it as we need it and have a couple of days of food that can be reheated.
 
I may revisit pureeing as our lifestyle allows for more kitchen time again.  It was well worth it to know that the food for them was whole and preservative free, and there was the side benefit of having purees to use in other foods.  The rest of us benefited from vegetables in baked goods and sauces; I even mixed them into the cheese and “melted” veggies into quesadillas.
 
Weekly update:
This week we introduced two new vegetables – carrots and peas.  Although Angelika has been handling a whole, peeled carrot as a teether, she had not eaten carrot before.  She loved them – pretty much attacked the food as it was making its way to her plate!  She also ate the peas with enthusiasm.
 
Angelika is doing much better getting the food into her mouth, instead of wearing it or tossing it.  Her diapers are showing us how much she is able to digest – there are still some pieces coming out whole, so to me it looks like her body is still learning to process the food.
 
Her bowel movements have been on and off again – some days they come in the morning as expected, other days none at all.  I am still backing off on solids until I see confirmation that her body is processing; then I go back to offering food at least twice a day.
 
She also had a diaper rash last week that made me nervous (she rarely gets rashes).  After a KST check by our chiropractor, he shared that it doesn’t seem to be food related.  Since she is still teething, he said that the increase in fluid production has changed the ph in her body.  I am going to follow his recommendation to add a dash of baking soda to her drink cup and see if that will clear up the rash.
 
That is it for our update this week.  I plan on introducing bananas and continuing with peas and carrots this week.  We will also revisit avocados.  If all goes well, we may try some baked apple.  I’ll wait and see how hot it gets in Arizona this week and decide if it’s worth it to turn on the oven.
 
I would love to hear from you – what is your experience with baby-led weaning?  How does it compare with feeding choices you have made for other children?
 
 
Food+ Diary
Monday, June 4
Little solid poop – about the size of a U.S. half-dollar
Veggie straws
Sweet potatoes and yams for lunch
 
Tuesday, June 5
U.S. nickel-sized poop at wake up
Lunch – some sweet potato and yam pieces – played more than ate
Epic diaper after lunch
Dinner – Avocado
 
Wednesday, June 6
BM in the am
Breakfast: peaches
Lunch:  yam/sweet potato
Dinner: - 1 tortilla chip
 
Thursday, June 7
No BM yet
Breakfast: Apple (teether), peaches
Lunch: Carrot teether
Dinner: 15 pieces of yams/sweet potatoes
 
Friday, June 8
No BM today!
Breakfast – peaches
Lunch – 4 veggie straws
 
Saturday, June 9
AM – 4 veggie straws
Lunch – GF graham cracker pieces
Dinner – steamed peas and carrots
BM – big one at night
 
Sunday, June 10
BM in the morning and early afternoon
Lunch – peas and carrots
Dinner – veggie straws
 
Monday, June 11
No BM
Breakfast – Apple teether
Lunch – 0
Dinner – veggie straws

Choking Link:
http://www.babyledweaning.com/2012/baby-led-weaning-diary-and-its-goodbye-from-siobhan-and-some-stuff-about-choking/
 
Disclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.
 

Food Chronicle: Angelika ~ Week 2

Posted on June 5, 2012 at 12:33 PM Comments comments (0)
  
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonHere is the second installment of introducing solids with our 8-month old.  She is our fourth child, so we are trying to apply the lessons we have learned with our previous children.  Additionally, I want to remind our readers that this is a snapshot into our family’s process since I have had many students ask about how we approach introducing solids.  This is not medical advice, nor is it based on any expert advice – this is purely anecdotal.   

Here is the first installment on introducing solids (read more).  Moving on to what we have done since then…   

Angelika’s bowel movements stayed along what we would expect to see (bowel movements in the morning), so we kept feeding her solids since our previous post.  We only had one day with no bowel movements, and we cut back on the solid food the next day, but that is about it.  All her “plumbing” seems to be working, so we are continuing to feed her a little food every day.   

Vegetables: We continued with yams and sweet potatoes, and added some regular potato to the mix.  She made a face when we gave her regular potatoes…not as sweet, I guess.  We are still giving her small, squishy-soft pieces.  They are about the size of a pinto bean when I cut them up.   

Fruit: I also tried a little avocado to start working in some “green” food.  She liked that and lunged at the next pieces I offered her.  I gave it to her during lunch last Thursday – since there were no adverse effects, I will try a little more this week.   

We have a peach tree in our backyard and I gave her fresh peaches on Saturday and Monday.  She LOVES those.  She would eat everything I put on her tray – very little of this food gets played with – the solid parts all make it into her mouth!  The juice is still everywhere, though.    

Munchies: We also have a little “snack” food for her.  A friend of ours introduced us to gluten-free Veggie Straws.  We buy ours at Costco – the base is potato starch, and they are flavored with spinach and tomato.  They dissolve in her mouth, so she can gnaw on them without the danger of choking on them. She gets five or six at a time…and like the other food, she mostly plays with it and some makes it into her mouth.   

The veggie straws are technically a “junk food” – there is no nutritional value, however, I can recognize and pronounce all the ingredients, which is important to me.  It is also free from sweeteners: no sugar, no corn syrup, and it’s soy-free.   

They work for now and I will use them for what they are – a tool to let me prepare food for the rest of the family.  Since I do not babywear around heat (the stove or the microwave), giving her something interesting buys us some time to work in the kitchen while she is sitting in her high chair safely away from heating elements.   

There are a couple of whole-foods I will give her to gnaw on while I am preparing food.  They are large in size and since baby cannot bite pieces off yet, and the large size minimizes them as a choking hazard.  One is a raw, peeled, whole carrot.  I also offer her a halved, peeled apple.  While she can’t “eat” them, she can enjoy sucking the flavor out of both of those foods.    

So, in summary, we have introduced four vegetables (sweet potato, yam, potato, carrot as a teething aid) and three fruits (avocado, peach, apple as a teething aid).  I did introduce two fruits last week, against the commonplace advice to introduce one at a time and to allow a week for “reaction time” to check for allergies.  I don’t count the spinach and tomato in the veggie straws since there is no nutritional value, there is not enough content to count as a “food” in my estimation.    

My plan is to continue with the same foods for this week, confirm that the plumbing is still working, and then introduce another fruit and another vegetable next week.  All in all, I like this approach to feeding without using baby cereal.  I like that I can pronounce all the ingredients in the food we are feeding her, and I know what the ingredients are without having to look them up on the internet dictionaries.  

It is not as fun for her siblings since they cannot spoon-feed her, however, I am okay with that trade-off.  Before we know it, Angelika will be a year old and they can start feeding her yogurt if she will let them.   

What do you think?  What is your strategy for transitioning from liquid food to solid food?   

 In case you are curious - for now our feeding schedule looks like this: 

  •  6:00 am – wake-up – breastmilk 
  •  7:00 am – water cup used as a teether (she has never taken a pacifier!) in the high chair while we get breakfast for the older kiddos.  
  •  ?? time – depends on our schedule – Breastfeed 
  •  10:00 am – water cup except now we are preparing a snack 
  •  ?? time – depends on our schedule – Breastfeed 
  •  11:30 am – “food” time – fruit, some vegetable 
  •  ?? time – depends on our schedule – Breastfeed 
  •  3:00 pm – water cup as we prepare snack, some veggie straws 
  •  ?? time – depends on our schedule – Breastfeed 
  •  6:00 pm – water cup and veggies as we prepare/eat our dinner 
  •  7:30 – 8:00 pm – Breastfeed before going to sleep for the night   


As you can see, I am still nursing her between every time we are serving food to her siblings.  She usually goes 2-3 hours between nursing sessions – it depends on what we are doing that day.    

I can also tell that she is nursing more efficiently – she usually only nurses for about 5-10 minutes, and then she is ready to rock and roll with her siblings.  The only time she lingers at the breast is at sleep-time.  She is still taking a mini-nap in the morning and in the afternoon.  At bedtime, there is no rush off of the breast since I have changed my sleep times to accommodate her schedule; we both pass out at the night feed.    

Angelika is also nursing through the night again.  She had been sleeping through the night; I am not sure when that changed, but I will wake up at night to find her nursing.  I am nursing her around 2:00 am, at 4:00 am, and again for wake-up between 6:00 and 6:30 am.  I seem to remember that this is a typical shift for us – when our older children got more mobile, they had less interest in nursing during the day and did more feeding through the night.  

Disclaimer:  
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.