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Sweet Pea Births

Chandler, Arizona

Sweet Pea Births

...celebrating every swee​t pea their birth

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Q&A with SPB: Is there anything I can do to make more milk?

Posted on August 30, 2016 at 10:01 AM Comments comments (29)

Today's question on Q&A with SPB: 

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
We are joined by Jennie Bever, PhD, IBCLC at the Arizona Breastfeeding Center to answer that question:




Recap:
You are not alone! This is a common question/worry that many moms have during pregnancy and postpartum.

There are many myths, tips and tricks that people share that may work for some moms, but really don't get to the core of the issue: how much milk is moving through the breast? The fact about milk production is that the more milk that is demanded, the more milk will be made.

So a lot of the time it's not really a supply issue, as much as it is a removal issue. In order to make milk, the body needs the signal that more milk is needed.

Some things to consider:
  1. Is the baby breastfeeding well, e.g., does the baby have a good latch?
  2. If the baby is working on latching, then get busy moving the milk! It's may be time to start pumping.
  3. Maybe it's time to call an IBCLC to find out what is needed for your situation.

Krystyna's little side note about pumps to consider:
  1. Do I have the right pump for the job I need it to do?
  2. Are all the parts working and do I have the right size flange?

An IBCLC can help you with both evaluating how you and baby are moving milk, and also answer any questions you have about pumping.

The bottom line:
While some of the galactagogues out there may help, you don't want to create more milk that still can't be moved...that may cause another hurdle (i.e., pugged ducts, mastitis). So before you spend lots of money on the "magic" herbs, teas, and foods that help some moms make more milk, check in with a lactation counselor to make sure that you and your baby are doing your best to remove the milk that is already being made.

Thank you again to Jenny for taking the time out of her busy day to answer today's Q&A with SPB!



Disclaimer: 
The material included in this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and related videos contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of Birthing From Within or The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of Birthing From Within, The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.   

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson


In Their Own Words: Courtney

Posted on August 26, 2016 at 7:08 AM Comments comments (22)
"In Their Own Words" is a blog series we share to bring you "real life" experiences from other mothers and their families.  Would you like to share your story? Please email me at krystyna{at}sweetpeabirths{dot}com to get started.

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson

Today we are featuring a Q&A we did with one of our pumping and working-out-of-the-home mothers. She shares her insight gained from pumping for both of her sweet peas, for a combined total of 34 months...and counting.

What was your vision of what pumping at work was going to entail?
I thought I knew what pumping at work was going to be like. I thought it would be a nice break in my day to sit and think about my baby. It was inconvenient and awkward to constantly explain myself. I had read all these books about breastfeeding, gone to support groups, talked to a Lactation consultant, talked to friends, and when it came down to it, I still had to find my own way. 

All the knowledge helped, but each relationship and situation is unique. I knew it was going to be work, and I knew that I could do it. I didn't realize how long I would be doing it. 2 years. I pumped at work for nearly 2 years.

I think that the most important step of the journey was making the commitment and educating myself. The most important part of making that successful was being surrounded by people that supported that commitment, and talking about it.

What was the reality?
At first, I was lucky. I worked with a group of women who were extremely supportive, including my best friend, who was still pumping for her son, 7 months older than my daughter. We brought in a couch, and ate lunch one handed, pumping side by side, while chatting with our colleagues, who breastfed their children. This gave me confidence that I didn't realize I would need later. Everything was normal.

What I didn't count on was leaving that job and starting over at a new school. I knew that I would pump when I went back to work, but I never really thought about how long I would do it. My daughter was 9 months old when I started at my new school. Though still supportive, there was no couch and no camaraderie. I was isolated and lonely. At about 12 months, I was starting to hate it. I would pump in my car, but hooking up with the stupid hands-free bra in a car that had been sitting in the sun all day while trying not to expose myself to passers-by. What a sweaty, frustrating ordeal. But! I kept doing it until she was nearly 2, sometimes cursing about it, but I did it.

Who did you have to talk to to make it happen?
Empowered by the ease of my first experience with pumping at work, in my new school, I knew what I was entitled too, but most of all, I was open about talking to people about pumping and breastfeeding, especially  the”extended” relationship. I wrote a very professional, informed, and informative email that sent to the entire Administrative team at the high school where I teach. My principal thanked me for the information that I provided and we even chatted for awhile about the inequity of motherhood in the workplace and how we both hope to see it change in our lifetime. As a single guy, he had never thought about it. I developed a view of myself as an advocate and found ways to normalize and  remove the stigma of  breastfeeding and pumping at work for an extended time. The more I talked about it frankly with those around me, the less I got a reaction; which I think is awesome! That's normalizing, right? Now that I am pumping for my 2nd child, my co-workers don’t bat an eyelash when I say, “I'll be back in 20. Going to make lunch for my son.”

What kind of provision did your employer make; and was it easy, or did you have to push hard?
I took the lead on advocating for myself in the workplace. I took the attitude of, “If I walk in like I own the place, no one will question me.” When I wrote my email to my administrators and had follow up conversations, I made sure to be informed and provide links to state and federal information, guidelines, and statutes that supported me. I informed my administrators of what was legally expected of them and what I was entitled to. I also provided them with my pumping schedule, and the location that I planned to pump. It was more like, “this is what I’m doing, and this is why you have to let me.” It wasn’t that I expected backlash. I wanted to be clear and straightforward.
My department head was very accommodating in scheduling my prep period for a time that was best for me to space out my pumping. I believe that all of this seemed “easy” because I was well informed and took the role of educating and informing my workplace, advocating for myself, and for other mothers in the future. I didn’t expect them to know what to do, and I didn’t expect anyone to change they way they went about their day to accommodate my needs. My commitment to my child would come first if there were any issues, but there were not.

What kind of support did your partner provide that was helpful?
My partner is extremely supportive, but didn’t quite get why I feel dejected when he would tell me “just pump” when I was trying to schedule my life around feeding my baby. We talked about it, and I explained rather than getting frustrated and shutting down. I would describe how frustrating it was to try to hook up to my pump in the car, in the heat, with a hands-free bra, and a nursing cover, or how I couldn’t do “x” because it was too close to feeding time, or wouldn’t allow me time to feed... and then I ran across an ad for the Freemie on Facebook! He bought me a set. I loved it. Then I complained that I had to wash them every day, and he bought me a second set, so I didn’t have to wash them every day. Best. Husband. Ever.

How much time should a mom plan for each pumping session? Any tips for better/easier letdown?
I usually pump for about 15 minutes. If I reflect on how I got to that, I started by pumping until I wasn’t ejecting any more milk. That would usually take about 20-25 minutes, which was about the length of my commute to work. I discovered that I was pumping more than the baby was eating, I would end up engorged on the weekends. I cut down to 15 minutes and now I end up about even with what baby consumes while I am gone.
To trigger letdown, at first I would just talk about my baby with my colleagues. Especially pumping side-by-side with another momma, let down was not difficult to achieve. Now, I start to let down a few minutes before I start pumping. When I changed schools, it was a little more difficult. I didn’t have that camaraderie any more. On more stressful days, it would take a little longer to trigger letdown. On these days, I sit quietly, turn off distractions, and breathe. Looking at pictures hasn’t worked for me in the past, but closing my eyes and visualizing nursing my baby has helped.

How long did you make the pumping commitment work - how did that match your expectations?
When we decided to breastfeed my husband and I talked about it. I wanted to do at least a year, but thought about continuing the more I learned about extended breastfeeding. Hubby was super supportive of extended breastfeeding, so I made the commitment to nurse as long as my daughter wanted to. I ended up weaning her when I became pregnant. She and I made it 22 months. I am now on month 12 of nursing and pumping for my son. I know that I probably sound like an ad for Freemie, but with Freemie, I don’t see myself stopping until he’s not nursing during the day anymore.

What words of advice would you give to someone who is ready to go back to work and wants to pump for their baby?
Be informed. Inform others. Have a plan. Have a backup plan. Keep perspective. This is for your baby, everybody else can take a number. You are legally protected. Get comfortable saying things like “expressing milk” and “breastfeeding” to complete strangers. They don’t understand euphemisms. I’ve pumped in many places that weren’t schools and I’ve never been told that they couldn’t help me. I hope it was because I was confident and informed. If I were being completely truthful, I smiled inside when I saw someone squirm. I thought to myself, “I’m making them change. This is good.” This is your right and my right to provide for our children. The more we make people uncomfortable, the more comfortable they become and the more “normal” feeding babies breastmilk will be for future generations.

As for the bottle, ask friends to borrow different types of bottles before you spend a fortune. Both of our kids like the Dr. Browns bottles, but that isn’t what we had a full set of. . .
I took twelve weeks off with both of my kids. With my daughter (first born) we tried a bottle with her the week before I went back. This was not soon enough because she wouldn’t take a bottle and I went to my first day back thinking, “my baby isn’t going to eat.” She did, and everything was fine, but I was stressed, which made it harder to pump and made it harder for me to do my job. I think even two weeks out would have been good. 

Don’t be the one to give baby the bottle. Have a partner, friend, or family member do it so the baby will actually try. I had to leave the house to get my daughter to even attempt a bottle. From our experience, don’t wait until they are starving. Giving a crying baby a bottle for the first time didn’t work out for us.

Bottom line? Be confident. Be informed. Inform others. Find your path. Ask for help. Be an advocate.


Thank you to Courtney for sharing her breastfeeding journey today <3 I hope it has touched you and inspired you in some way, and that you will take heart and courage in your own breastfeeding journey.

UPCOMING EVENTS:
Phoenix La Leche League: Live, Latch, Love
As part of the LLL area conference
August 26th, 5-7 PM
Embassy Suites Biltmore
 
La Leche League Conference
August 26-28, 2016
Embassy Suites Biltmore

Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
Disclaimer: 
The material included in this blog is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and related videos contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of Birthing From Within or The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of Birthing From Within, The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

In Their Own Words: Amy

Posted on August 5, 2016 at 7:51 AM Comments comments (2)
"In Their Own Words" is one of my favorite series on the blog.  It lets families share their stories, and help others along the way.  Thank you, Amy, for taking the time to write out your breastfeeding story.  We are honored to be able to share it with other mothers who are facing challenges along their breastfeeding journey.
 ~Krystyna



I always wanted to be able to nurse, to provide for my babies in that way, and to experience the bond. For whatever reason, I always felt confident that I would be able to, as well. When I finally became pregnant, however, my confidence dwindled. Maybe it was the stories, the testimonies other women share, sometimes even when you don't want to hear.
 
When people would ask if I planned to breastfeed the baby, my "Yes" changed rather quickly to "I hope to." Until one day a dear friend, who I had confided in, overheard someone else asking me (yet again). After I responded my hopeful, "I hope so...if I'm able," she said very confidently, "No. It's time to start saying YES, absolutely." It was a turning point for me.

When my sweet baby boy came, and "lost more weight then they like to see" within the first week, the pediatrician called in the lactation consultant. We discussed options and goals. She used words/phrases and charts that made me second-guess myself, insisted we at least take the boxes of formula home over the weekend and requested that we come back Monday for another weight check.
 
I cried right there in the office. I am still shocked that a lactation consultant pushed formula to that degree, especially at an office that holds breastfeeding at such a high regard. We never opened those boxes. We posted "Milk Parlor" signs on the doors, got out the breast pump to help with my let down, and locked the doors to the outside world for the next 72 hours.
 
Baby boy FEASTED(!) and gained his weight back plus some. Of course it wasn't easy... I was up pumping while the entire house was sleeping, including baby. I was sleep deprived, emotionally exhausted and entirely dependent on my support system. But boy-o-boy was it worth it.
 
My advice to momma's getting ready to start the journey... Take advantage of the free breast pump through your insurance (if insured) and get it BEFORE baby comes, if possible. It could be your saving grace that helps bring your milk in. Your midwife or OB can write a prescription for a pump, which you'll need when you call your insurance.
 
It's okay to be confident and proud about your ability to breastfeed. You should be. You're AMAZING.
 
You're not alone. At any given moment there are likely hundreds (maybe thousands) of women around the world experiencing labor with you, sleep deprivation with you, etc. Channel their energy. Call on your village. We love you and care about you.
 
Disclaimer: 
The material included in this video is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The viewer should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and video contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.
 
Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson


Tuesday Tip: Engorgement

Posted on November 10, 2015 at 8:54 AM Comments comments (0)


Puma and I had the pleasure of attending the Club MomMe Family Fest in LA on Sunday.  What an amazing day connecting with people who serve families in the childbearing year! It was a full day, and we are sorry we didn't get to meet everyone on our list.

One of the people I did get to visit with was Dymphna Gruijters, IBCLC and exhibitor for Lansinoh. Every time I see her, I learn something new!  

This time,  she shared a simple tip that can help moms decide when/how to use their Thera-Pearl 3-in-1 Breast Therapy treatment packs.

COLD: Apply cold therapy packs when you are engorged. When a mama is engorged, there is so much water in the breast tissue that the milk ducts are constricted. Applying a cold therapy pack helps move the water and make space for the milk ducts so that the milk can flow.

HOT: The heat helps to relieve mastitis and plugged ducts, and my favorite part as a former pumping mom? It can help you pump more efficiently!! Apply the hot packs on the outside of the flange of your breast pump so the heat can encourage your milk flow.  Brilliant!

Just another reason to love Lansinoh. Thank you, Dymphna+Lansinoh, for coming out to support moms on Sunday, and for all that you have done to help promote breastfeeding.

Do you have a favorite Lansinoh product? Tell us about it!

Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 
 

Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

In Their Own Words: Rachel

Posted on August 21, 2015 at 7:09 AM Comments comments (0)

I didn't nurse very long - 8 months with my daughter, 12 months with my son (although still using breast milk in a bottle from 12 months until the freezer stash runs out because he started taking a bottle at 12 months due to medical reasons).

The biggest help was seeing a lactation consultant. I think everyone should see one, starting in the hospital! I usually ask for one right away, but for my second, following up months later was the best thing I ever could have done. 

At 9 months, my doctor felt I should supplement my son. When I went to the lactation consultant, she spent extra time with me and determined my son WAS gaining weight after eating, and he was just a slow eater. She encouraged me to just let him graze instead of force ounces on him. 

I think having a lactation consultant and having friends who also breastfeed or pump helps keep you going and helps you to not give up. With my firstborn, my friend and I had "pumping parties" in my cubicle and she kept me going because it was just what we did. Although I quit far earlier than I wanted due to stress, she was able to feed her son until he was 2, and supplement breast milk for my daughter. Having help is key!!

Tips for Work and Breastfeeding: Making it work!
20 Pumping Tips from SPB Moms

A Closer Look at Break Time for Nursing Mothers

Breastfeeding Support Groups
Local, national (USA) and international groups

Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 
 

Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only. 
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


In Their Own Words: Dezerrae

Posted on August 14, 2015 at 9:48 AM Comments comments (47)
In Their Own Words: Dezerrae
A Story about Breastfeeding and the NICU

"In Their Own Words" is one of my favorite series on the blog.  It lets families to share their stories, and help others along the way.  Thank you, Dezerrae, for taking the time to write out your breastfeeding story.  We are honored to be able to share it with other mothers who are facing challenges along their breastfeeding journey.
 ~Krystyna

My first experience with breastfeeding did not go well. I had a very long labor with my daughter, she had to go to the NICU and was immediately given formula. She never learned to latch, and I was never able to nurse. I did not realize all the resources that are out there, and had no support at home or anyone to ask advice from. I pumped exclusively for 4 months and was able to give her breast milk for 6 months.
 
My second experience with breastfeeding was much more successful, but just as hard. My son was born at 28 weeks, at 2 lb and 9 oz. He of course went immediately to the NICU. He was so small and fragile I was determined to give him the best, and all I knew was that breast milk would be best for his tiny fragile body. I started pumping immediately after birth, and having pumped exclusively with my daughter, I was very comfortable pumping.
 
My son spent exactly 2 months in the NICU. I diligently pumped every 2 to 3 hours round the clock day in and day out. I dealt with engorgement, thrush, clogged ducts, and exhaustion. My son needed me. He needed to be given the best nutrition possible, so I pumped every day and brought him milk to the NICU every day.
 
After 2 months he was released from the NICU. The lactation consultant told me to not feel discouraged, as he would probably never latch on. That drove me to fight even harder to have a breastfeeding relationship with him, not with just bottles, but also with nursing. When he came home I tried every day to get him to latch with no success.

 
When he was 3 months old I felt so tired of pumping, and felt like quitting. Late at night I cried it all out, took a deep breath, and tried to nurse him at 3 am. At 3 am at 3 months old he latched on, and he nursed every day after that. It was amazing: just when I felt like quitting our prayers were answered. Every time I felt like quitting I would say to myself, "just one more day, just pump one more day and see how I feel tomorrow.'' That mantra got us through a year of breastfeeding.
 
My suggestion to anyone attempting to breastfeed would be to find a friend or peer to connect with and ask questions. My first time would have been so much more successful had I had even one person to ask questions and have them say, you're going to be ok! This is normal. You're doing a great job, and it's ok to be frustrated with the process. With my first child I tried to power through it all on my own. I couldn't. I needed support. Never be ashamed or scared to reach out for help.  When you are having a hard time or feeling like your body is not your own just remember, get through one more day and sleep on it. Tomorrow is another day.

Do you have a NICU breastfeeding story? What helped you?
Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 

Dezerrae is a Certified Doula through Doulas of North America (DONA). She has a passion for helping other families through their birth journey.  You can contact her here:
 

Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


Breastfeeding + Work: Making it work!

Posted on August 3, 2015 at 10:32 AM Comments comments (65)
Laura is wearing a Belabumbum pajama set, and a teething necklace by Chewbeads
Diaper bag by JuJuBe

The theme for this year’s World Breastfeeding Awareness Week is “Breastfeeding and Work: Let’s make it work!”

While it certainly can be more convenient to formula feed while at work, that is not the choice that all families want to make.  (Side note: As long as the baby is put to the breast during contact hours, and barring other complications, the body will make the supply according to demand. It is possible to do a mix of formula feeding and breastfeeding as long as the baby is consistently put to the breast.  Putting the baby to the breast places "the order" for it to be available again at the same time tomorrow.)

Since putting the baby to the breast places "the order" for breastmilk to be available again at the same time tomorrow, some mother's are choosing to use a breast pump at work to make sure their supply stays strong and consistent for their Sweet Peas.  This allows for an exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) situation during the first six months as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.  Thanks to breast pumps, families can EBF even when the mother returns to a workplace or work arrangement in the home.  This is not necessarily or convenient, hence today's choice of quote in our image.
 
I asked our former students for some input on this topic, and two things became clear:
 

  1. The decision to pump at work to provide breastmilk for baby and keep up the mother’s milk supply can be very isolating. 
  2. We still have a long way to go in educating peers, managers, administrators, etc., on the time, energy, and commitment it takes to pump. 

 
A note about the time if you haven't pumped at work or while traveling:  
It’s not just the 10-15 minutes spent with the machine.  It takes time to settle into the space so that one is mentally ready to pump, the actual pumping time, and then the time afterwards to store properly and clean parts so that they are sanitized and ready to go for the next pumping session.  All told, a pumping session could take at least 30 minutes; maybe a little less on a day when mama isn’t stressed and the milk flows freely.
 
"Letting down" to a breast pump takes acclimation.  We were not designed to feed to a machine.  If you have questions about finding the right pump for you, click back to read a guest post written by Debbie Gillespie, IBCLC about finding the right pump for the job you need it to do (more on that HERE).

One way I "trained" my body to pump was to nurse my Sweet Pea on one side, while I pumped on the other.  By getting used to pumping with our baby, it made it easier to connect the machine to making milk for our child when I had to do pump without them.
 
HERE are resources for you to share with your workplace, and some for you to help you finesse your talking points with your co-workers, managers, etc.
 
I also want to share some collected tips from our students, and some from me from my pumping days:

  • Play music that reminds you of your Sweet Pea.
  • Carry something that reminds you of your baby or smells like them.
  • Look at their picture while you pump.
  • Your pump mechanism is going to sound in cadence – make up a mantra that you can chant along with it.  Mine was, “This is milk for my baby.”
  • Think about using the word, ‘lactation” instead of, “breastfeeding,” to ease into conversations about your needs with your boss. (LLL)
  • Try not to skip pumping sessions. (Amy Y)
  • Have a schedule and stick to it! (Francis H)
  • I bought multiple pump parts so during the day at work I actually didn't wash them I just used a clean set (I pumped 3 times). It saved me lots of time and just washed everything once I got home. (Francis H)
    (NOTE: Breastfeeding supplies are covered under the ACA - should be provided at no cost to you by your insurer - read more about that HERE)
  • Medala wipes were a lifesaver for me. The nearest sink was too far away. So I would wipe everything clean after each pumping using those wipes. (April M)
  • Pump and freeze a nice freezer stash while you’re on leave if you can.  Costco has excellent deals on deep freezers if you run out of space. (Laura A)
  • Set a goal you can achieve – even if it’s short term. (Laura A)
  • Be organized with your pump, cleaning parts, storage containers, and cooler. (Laura A)
  • Don't worry about labeling until you get home if you’re short on time. (Laura A)
  • Consider a hand pump for times when you can’t do a long pump – it will protect your supply if you pump even a little bit. (Laura A) 
  • If possible, choose a job that is flexible or has a good schedule and budget for less income if you can. (Laura A)
  • Dress for easy access. Wear nursing bras that unclip and a shirt that does not need to be taken all the way off, just pulled down unbuttoned partially. This helps with time management. (Laura A)
  • Seek out other co-workers who are pumping at work – it helps to know you are not alone. (Courtney D)
  • When a workplace has a place to pump, it's a good start, but the true contributor to success is the emotional, and scheduling support, that a workplace can provide that will make the biggest difference. (Courtney D)
  • One thing that has made a big difference in several airports is Mamava. Mamava are little pods set up in airports, stores, etc throughout the country and are made just for nursing/ pumping moms! They are private, comfortable and have a place to sit, a table, and an electrical outlet. The Mamava app is free and will tell you exactly where they are located. (Meghan C)
  • When you book a hotel, be sure to request a fridge and let them know it's for medical reasons so they don't charge you extra for it. (Meghan C)

 
Anecdotal reflections from our students 
I am sharing these because if you are feeling isolated in your choice, I want to validate you - YOU ARE NOT ALONE.  YOU ARE NOT CRAZY FOR WANTING THIS.  IT IS WORTH IT.

Amy Y:
We pumped for 8 months while I was working. It was challenging because my supply didn't hold up. He stopped breastfeeding at 6 months and so we pumped and bottle-fed exclusively. I would wake up at 2am to pump even though baby slept through the night. If I had to do that again I would use supplements sooner and never skip pumps. Stress also made it a lot harder. With baby #2 I actually changed jobs to work at a school where she is on-site and I don't have to pump. That was totally worth the pay cut.
 
I think a lot of the challenges are just people generally not being supportive. I was much more confident with my second and I told the people in my life that I wanted their support and that it hurt to not have it. It made a big difference and I'm glad I stood up for myself.
 
 
Laura A:
We’re still pumping and breastfeeding today at +1:) 
I went back to work as an airline pilot at 6 months postpartum

Tips:
-Pump and freeze a nice freezer stash while your on leave if you can.  Costco has excellent deals on deep freezers if you run out of space.
- My job is exempt of nursing/pumping laws, so it helped me to have good educational discussions with co-workers about the health benefits of breastmilk and why I personally have chosen to extend pumping and made sure to discuss with them how often and long I will need to pump on breaks at the airport. At times, this puts more workload on my captain on a "quick turn" of the aircraft so I make sure to always ensure they also receive breaks through our day by always helping with additional workload on the other quick turns. This has helped me to get a lot of support from my fellow crews. 
- Every personality is different on how to achieve goals, but for me with pumping at work, it was better that I was very relaxed with my goal. Since it wasn't supported by our industry, I decided to do a no pressure goal. I just decided to take each week as it comes and evaluate how baby and I are doing. If pumping ever got to be too stressful then I would stop. We're going over a year now and it is still working great for both of us :) 
- Be organized with your pump, cleaning parts, storage containers, and cooler. Don't worry about labeling until you get home if you’re short on time. I use a hand pump at work because it is easiest for me to quickly assemble and keep in a cooler. The times that I can't do a long pump I can at least relieve and keep my supply strong. 
- If you can, choose a job that is flexible or has a good schedule and budget for less income if you can. I have chosen to stay a senior first officer to ensure I can hand pick my schedule. This is a pay cut and a hold on career advancement, but it has been priceless for this time in our life. I can pick day trips and schedules that work for my son well and also allow for breaks to pump fairly easily.
- Dress for easy access. Wear nursing bras that unclip and a shirt that does not need to be taken all the way off, just pulled down unbuttoned partially. This helps with time management.
 
 
Courtney D:
I took 10 weeks of maternity leave. When I returned to work, I pumped 3-4 times a day. I am a high school teacher. Each day, I would pump at least once, in my car, driving to, or from work. At first, it was a way to reconnect and think of my little one while I was working. I had a coworker that was pumping for her son as well, and I worked in a department, with all women, that were tremendously supportive. My friend and I would pump side by side and eat lunch and chat with our coworkers. It was a time to be together and I felt supported. That feeling lasted about a year. I had to change jobs and while my new school and department were supportive of my breastfeeding goals, I was not able to have that same social connection. I was lonely, and when asked to go to a meeting or do something during a time that I needed to pump, I was constantly making others feel awkward when I told them why I couldn't make it. 

I continued to pump until she was 22 months, when she was down to only nursing in the morning and at bedtime. It was at around 18 months that I started to hate pumping. It was now a tedious thing that isolated me from others, but I kept at it. Occasionally, I would have to ask for donor milk, but never had to use it. I always seemed to be able to provide just enough for her while I was gone. She continued to nurse until she was 26 months. My goal was always for her to breastfeed as long as she wanted to. She self-weaned; stopping on her own when I became pregnant again. 

I think that the #1 contributor to my pumping success was the support I received from those around me. When a workplace has a place to pump, it's a good start, but the true contributor to success is the emotional, and scheduling support that a workplace can provide that will make the biggest difference. 

I am not looking forward to pumping again, but I plan to make it work.
 
 
Francis H:
I was lucky with J. to have a very supportive principal (I'm a kinder teacher) that adjusted my schedule so I had the appropriate breaks to pump; but with C. and my new principal I did not. I had to be assertive with her and demand my time to pump. It was hard at first, but I knew I was the only advocate for my daughter. I was committed to continuing our breastfeeding relationship and for us that meant pumping at work. I also starting working on my stash 2 months before returning. On days I pumped less (stress, or unexpected school situations or illness) I was comforted in knowing I had back up milk for them.
 
 
Nisa C:
I returned to work as a Research Assistant and PhD grad student at ASU when my first was 6 weeks old. Thankfully, I was in a very supportive environment. As long as I got my work done on time, when and how didn't matter. And Z was welcome in our lab! Z became an honorary grad student as I brought him to work. I was given a private room to nurse in. I stored my Boppy™ and burp cloths in that room. I did have to pump when I had class. At most I was away for 3-4 hours including commute time. I would pump in the morning, and nursed him before and after class. Our breastfeeding relationship lasted over 2 years.
 
April M:
Our daughter is now almost 17 months old and still nursing about 3-4 times a day. As we gear up for the start of a new semester of college teaching, I'm trying to figure out how much I'll need to pump to keep me comfortable and keep up the supply. We are weaning her, but in a very gentle way, just slowing cutting back the number of sessions. However, we will likely to continue to allow her to nurse before bed and upon waking as long as that seems to be working for both her and me.
 
Because I never did respond terribly well to the pump, I had to pump quite a bit to get those few ounces we needed (4-5 oz), but it was enough to get us through. Like a few other posters, I found the process rather lonely. I could no longer socialize at all on campus and basically came to work, shut my office door, pumped and then headed off to class. The same thing happened at lunch. So no lunches with colleagues, or chats before or after class. On numerous occasions I would have colleagues question me about leaving a meeting early, even when I had repeatedly explained that I needed to have at least 15 minutes before my afternoon classes to pump.
 
It's very frustrating when people who are truly trying to be supportive, many of whom breastfed and pumped themselves, still forget about the complex logistics needed to keep breastfeeding while working full time. I don't know what the solution is, but I hated that the onus was always on me to remind everyone about my need to be accommodated.
 
In spite of it all, I'm very proud of the fact that I've continued to provide her with breast milk for this long. It's been worth it, but far more challenging than I expected.

Do you have any "back to work" breastfeeding+pumping tips to share?
Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 
 

Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


 

Upcoming Events: Bump to Breast Fest

Posted on March 27, 2015 at 4:41 PM Comments comments (0)

We are so pleased to congratulate the Arizona Breastfeeding Center on their one-year anniversary!! We are so grateful to have them as a resource for birthing families in the Phoenix area.

As they celebrate their first year in operation, they are hosting a fun family event tomorrow.  Read more about The Bump to Breast Fest in our virtual interview with the two founders of the Arizona Breastfeeding Center, Desiree Allison, IBCLC and Jennie Bever, IBCLC.

What is the inspiration behind the first Bump to Breast Fest?
The short answer is the wonderful community and families that have made The Arizona Breastfeeding Center possible.  
The Arizona Breastfeeding Center is a unique place, there are only a handful of similar centers across the United States, owned by IBCLCs (International Board Certified Lactation Consultants) and are contracted with a few insurance companies.  When we came up with the idea for the Bump to Breast Fest, we truly wanted a way to give a heartfelt thanks for the many families that have come through our doors since we opened.  We believe it is critical to always give back to the community.  

What kind of information will be available to families?
We will have a mix of fun and educational classes. Car seat technicians will be onsite to check car seat installations.  Tours of the breastfeeding center will be available and you can meet our providers.  We will also have photographers on site to take free bump, family, or breastfeeding portraits.  
 
(Find the schedule of events at the end of today’s post)

Who will be joining you at the event?
 
Our vendors include:  
My Root Elements (website HERE)
Bubbles of Joy (website HERE
Nikki Brewer Ha Yoga Tempe (website HERE
Doula Table Meet & Greet
Babywearing International (website HERE
Arizona Breastfeeding Bag Project with Massage Envy offering chair massages (websites HERE and HERE
Car Seat Safety Technicians from Southwest Collision (website HERE)
 
There will be snacks and drinks for sale at the event, but no food truck. There are several restaurants nearby for families needing something heartier:  Smash Burger, Chipotle, Qdoba,  Whole Foods, Little India, and Pita Shack.  

Who is the event tailored for?
This event is tailored for pregnant women and breastfeeding moms, as well as those who support them and want to learn more about local resources and general information.   

Is there a "prime time" to visit?
I think it depends on what a person is interested in!  It is an open house style event, come and go as you please.  You do not need to be present to win the raffle items, but you do need to pick up within a week of the event at our office.  Our raffle items will be drawn at 12:45pm.

Is there any cost associated with the event?
The event is free to attend!  This includes entry, one free raffle ticket, classes, vendor courtyard, and photography sessions with Danielle Jensen and Beverly Houpt.  We have some lovely items for our raffles and additional tickets will be for sale ($1.00/ticket).  Items included in the drawings are:  2 Limerick PJ's Comfort hospital grade breast pumps, Brestfriend Twin Pillow, Breastfeeding Classes, Custom mother/baby hand and footprint cast, Membership to Babywearing International of Phoenix, Cloth diapers, Gift basket from Bubbles of Joy, Gift from My Root Elements, Prize package from Brilliant Breastfeeding including a pumping bra, nursing shirt and bamboobies nursing pads and last but not least a lovely Tula baby Carrier!

Krystyna's note - we also dropped off an SPB prize package to the ladies this morning...this is our contribution to the raffle:
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
  
Some vendors may also have items for sale or raffle tickets for fundraisers.

What do you hope families will gain from attending your event?
We hope families feel thoroughly spoiled by coming to the event, enjoying the classes, having their picture taken, and mingling in the courtyard!  We hope they feel a sense of community and the gratitude we have for them supporting the Arizona Breastfeeding Center.  If they have a little fun and learn something new along the way, all the better.  
 
Here are the details:
WHAT: Bump to Breast Fest hosted by the Arizona Breastfeeding Center
 
WHEN: Saturday, March 28, 2015 from 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
 
WHERE: 4703 S. Lakeshore Dr. Suite 2, Tempe AZ 85282
 
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
9:30 AM 
Bump and Babywearing Yoga by Dara DaCuhna, DC and Babywearing International, Phoenix.  
 
10:00 AM 
Milk Circle:  Share your Breastfeeding Journey, hosted by Michelle Hottya, IBCLC, Arizona Breastfeeding Center
 
10:30 AM 
Learn Infant Massage, with Gilad Shoham of Southwest Institute of the Healing Arts.  (Space is limited and there is a wait list)
 
11:00 AM  
How to Have a Hospital Birth Your Way, with Belinda Hodder of Valley Women For Women Midwives
 
11:30 AM  
Learn to Wear your Baby (and your twins!) with Laketa Kemp
 
12:00:  
Create a Back to Work Breastfeeding Game Plan, with Jennie Bever, PhD, IBCLC, Arizona Breastfeeding Center
 
12:30 PM  
Shake your hips in a Postpartum Bellydance Class with Leslie Bradford, Arizona Breastfeeding Center.  

Disclaimer:  
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson The material included on this site is for informational purposes only. 
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


Top 5 Breastfeeding Products

Posted on August 19, 2014 at 2:15 PM Comments comments (30)
I really enjoyed making these videos with Talisha from Modern Mommy Boutique last year.  Since it is Breastfeeding Awareness Month 2014, here is a look at her recommendation for the Top 5 products you need as a new nursing mama.  

If you are in or near Chandler, Arizona, you can pick these up at her store in front of the Chandler Fashion Mall.  If you are out of state, she ships or you can of course, choose your favorite on-line retailer.  

Scroll down to see my 2014 update on food-safe nipple cream.  Enjoy!

For today's video, I asked her to highlight her Top 5 picks for breastfeeding, and we ended up with a bonus in there.  It's a quick video (under 5 minutes)...also did a little picture gallery. 

Enjoy!
 




 : Talisha talked about in the different shapes of nursing pillows. This close-up shows the difference between a U-shaped pillow, and a L-shaped pillow like a Bosom Baby.that Talisha highlights.
Talisha talked about in the different shapes of nursing pillows. This close-up shows the difference between a U-shaped pillow, and a L-shaped pillow like a Bosom Baby.that Talisha highlights.
A note on food-safe nipple cream:  
One of our students is studying to be an aesthetician. She heard a presentation on lanolin.  Besides being marketed as a breast nipple cream, it is also a common ingredient in beauty products.  She learned in the lecture that depending on how the sheep is fed, the lanolin may have carcinogens in it *because* the grass that is fed to the sheep is not guaranteed to be free of pesticides and carcinogens.  And the chemicals that cannot be digested by the sheep is stored in the fat.  A little more on lanolin from PBS:

Lanolin Lanolin is the smelly pale-yellow natural oil found on sheep's wool. As a waste product in wool processing, it's also known as wool oil, wool wax, wool fat, or wool grease. It's a natural water repellant — the function of which, as it's not too hard to guess, is to waterproof the sheep. Lanolin also has anti-fungal and antibacterial properties that protect the sheep's skin from infection. Derived from the animal's oil glands, lanolin is a mixture of wool fat and 25-30% water. Wool fat is a mixture of many different chemical compounds, including cholesterol and the esters derived from 'fatty' acids containing 18 to 26 carbon atoms.

And this excerpt from an article in FORBES:

Lanolin is the oily secretion found in sheep wool...Those sheep are also very likely to have been dipped in insecticides on the farm. These pesticides can accumulate in fat tissue, which researchers worry could affect the breast milk of new mothers.


So between the carcinogen in the fats and the pesticides in the wool, research your lanolin-based nipple creams before you buy!  Or just go with something else, like the Motherlove cream that Talisha has on her Top 5 list.

What would be on your Top 5 List?
Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 

More posts about Breastfeeding:
Breastfeeding Cafe Blog Carnival

Breastfeeding Awareness Month

Black Breastfeeding Week

 
Disclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.
 
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonWe are now enrolling for our Winter Series
The Bradley Method® for New Parents:
December 5, 2014 through February 20, 2015
Classes meet at 6:30 pm

Bradley™ “Next” – full series plus focus on sibling preparation - for returning students only
By request - please contact us for more information
 

For more information or to register, please call us at 602-684-6567 or email us at [email protected]

Birth News: Insurance Companies and Breast Pumps

Posted on February 6, 2014 at 8:06 PM Comments comments (1)

 
All insurance companies were mandated to provide nursing mothers with breastfeeding equipment and counseling as per the Affordable Care Act.  

HERE is another look at the services provided to pregnant and lactating women from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

In an effort to meet the demand, breastfeeding equipment companies have ramped up production.  It has come to our attention that there may be a quality control issue with some of these pumps.  Our friends at Modern Mommy report seeing at least one insurance pump a week since the beginning of the year, mostly the Ameda branded product, for troubleshooting.  This week they saw at least one every day….it seems like there is definitely something going on.  The suspicion is that there is something happening in the manufacturing process as companies rise to meet the demand.  

The problem they are seeing with the Ameda pump is what they describe as "vapor locking", and they are finding it has nothing to do with the parts. If you lift the lid to break the suction it will work again. The problem is most of the time, it is going to keep malfunctioning this way.
 
If you have a pump that does not seem to be working well, turn it off and call your authorized breast pump retailer for a test appointment.  Here in East Valley of Phoenix, AZ, we know that Modern Mommy Boutique will be able to help you troubleshoot your pump.  Take it right into the store for them to test your machine.  They can check it to see if it is a machine problem or a part problem.
 
Another thing to keep in mind: Expressing milk from a pump, whether manually or electrically, should not hurt or cause injury.  In addition, a breast pump should also express a decent amount of milk.  That will vary according to the mother, how accustomed she is to pumping, and also according to the kind of pump she are using.  Over time, you might expect to build up to being able to express a fair amount of milk.  

For example: When I got "good" at pumping, I was able to pump 8-ounces at a time, up from a dismal and depressing ½ ounce the first time I ever tried to express milk using the breast pump.
 
If it hurts to pump, if you are seeing damage to your breast tissue or your nipple, and/or if you are not getting the amount of milk that you think you should, know that it’s not you
 
A few things to know about breast pumps:

  • We are not created equal – there are different size flanges for different size nipples.  If something doesn’t feel right about the way you are pumping, make an appointment with an IBCLC* to have a “pump fitting”.  They can help you determine what size of a flange you should have, and teach you best pumping practices so that you can pump safely and efficiently for your baby.
  • Pumps are not created equal – the law does not state what kind of pump they have to cover, just that they have to cover them or provide them.  If you are getting the “free” one from your insurance carrier, they can pay for anything from an inexpensive hand-pump to a top of the line $3000 machine used in hospitals that is designed for multiple users.
  • Read up on the kind of pump you are getting.  If it doesn’t sound like the right pump for your needs, start advocating for something different in pregnancy before you need it to do the work.
  • They are not the most effective device to empty the breast – your baby is.  The suction from a pump is different from the suction your baby creates.  It may get most of the milk, definitely not all of it.  Do not believe that the amount you can pump is the amount you are making and delivering to your baby – it is hardly an accurate measure, in part because…
  • You have to learn to let-down to the pump – it becomes a trained response.  Do not be discouraged if you sit down to pump and you can barely reach the 1-ounce line the first few times.  It is plastic, hard, mechanical and loud to pump.  Much, much different than snuggling your Sweet Pea into your skin and smelling their soft skin – your baby and pheromones actually help you let down! They are not there with the pump, so until you get used to it, it will be a learning curve to fill up those bags or bottles. You can aid let-down by looking at a picture of your baby, playing music that relaxes you and/or reminds you of baby, doing deep breathing for relaxation, bring an item your baby wore the day before to "breathe them in" as you pump, use self-talk - there are definitely ways to remind your body of your baby to let down and pump more milk.

 
Your insurance company will probably have a policy in place that you may, or may not, be able to negotiate around.  As per the AAP document, this is what they are required to do:
“The ACA requires non-grandfathered health insurance plans to cover the cost of breast pump rental and purchase at low or no cost to consumers.” 
 
As I mentioned above, there is not a type of pump specified in the law.  If your first pump isn’t working, you are generally recommended to call the manufacturer to send replacement parts or a new machine.  Note: You would have a stronger argument for a new machine if you take it into an authorized retailer for testing, and the new parts installed as per manufacturer specifications yielded the same kind of error you are getting at home.
 
If your replacement parts/machine are still not working as expected, consider calling your insurance carrier.  Here are some ideas:

  • Request a different product.
  • Ask for them to cover the rental cost of a pump that works while you wait for your parts to arrive.
  • Ask for them to cover the rental cost of a pump instead of providing the equipment.
  • Ask for them to send you the cost of the pump they provide so you can apply it towards the purchase of the pump that does the job that you need it to do.
  • Get a note from your care provider that specifies the kind of pump that you need and send it in with a request to your insurance company.

 
A big consideration in advocating for yourself is ensuring that your insurance company provides the kind of product that you need for your breastfeeding relationship.  If they won't provide that, ask if they will send you the amount equivalent to the cost of the product they cover so you can purchase the right pump for the job you and your baby need it to do. Depending on how your insurance company interprets the law, you may or may not be able to have this happen. 

About "getting the right pump for the job":

  • If you are an occasional user, pumping enough for a night out or an occasional day away from your baby, you may just need a simple hand-pump with less parts to clean and nothing electrical to keep track of.  
  • If you are going back to work, you want the kind of machine that will maintain your supply, and you may want a dual-machine so that you can pump quickly and get back to your obligations at your workplace. 
  • If you are creating and building a supply, you need a top-of-the line pump designed to mimic a baby’s suction (see the Symphony pictured above).  You might be in this category if you are building a supply to feed an adopted child, if you have a preemie and/or a baby in NICU or PICU, or if you are exclusively pumping for a child with physical impediments to breastfeeding that you may eventually switch over to breastfeeding (or not) and you want to exclusively pump for an extended period of time.

 
You are well within your right to be an informed consumer.  If you suspect something is wrong, it probably is.  Do not take an “expert” word for it – you are the only expert on your body.  Keep advocating until you get the kind of equipment and support that you need and are entitled to under the health care law.

Have you gotten a “free” breast pump from your insurance company? What has your experience been?
Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 

*Under the law, breastfeeding counseling is also covered – the gold standard in lactation care is an International Board-Certified Lactation Counselor (IBCLC), who holds the equivalent of a college-degree in breastfeeding support.
From the AAP fact sheet: “…breastfeeding benefits for non-grandfathered health insurance plans include pre- and postnatal counseling by a trained provider in conjunction with each child. Women may access comprehensive lactation support and counseling from trained providers. The benefits are available at no cost share to consumers.”
Most IBCLC's charge by the minute.  It only takes ten minutes to do a complete tour of your pump, get fitted, and learn how to use your pump.  It's about the cost of a new set of flanges ($13)...totally worth it since your nipple size doesn't change with each child.  
 
A big thank you to Talisha Heiden from Modern Mommy Boutique and Desiree Allison, IBCLC from Arizona Breastfeeding Center, and Debbie Gillespie, IBCLC from Mommy Help Center for their time and expertise that informed this post.
 
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

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