Shopping Cart
Your Cart is Empty
Quantity:
Subtotal
Taxes
Shipping
Total
There was an error with PayPalClick here to try again
CelebrateThank you for your business!You should be receiving an order confirmation from Paypal shortly.Exit Shopping Cart

Sweet Pea Births

Chandler, Arizona

Sweet Pea Births

...celebrating every swee​t pea their birth

Blog

Q&A with SPB: How do I know my Sweet Pea is ready for solids?

Posted on November 8, 2016 at 10:50 AM Comments comments (0)

Q: How do I know if my Sweet Pea is ready for solids?

A: There are four things to look for!!




First of all, you want to be sure that your baby is interested...they WANT to eat.  You will know by their behaviors... they are interested, tracking food with their eyes when you eat, and/or  they reaching for the food around them!! It has nothing to do with what your family or friends have to say about it or what the people in your meet-up groups are doing with their Sweet Peas who are in a similar age bracket.  You and your baby know best!!  If you are concerned about your baby's development, then please reach out to your trusted care provider and see what they have to say on the matter.

After you decide that your baby is ready, look for these next three signals of food readiness.  We learned these points over the years of attending La Leche League meetings, Our family waited for these to be true before we started offering our sweet peas "table food":

  1. Sweet Pea can get themselves into a seated position and hold themselves there without being propped up by pillows, chairs, other people, etc.
  2. Sweet Pea has developed their pincer grip...in other words my breasts and the back of my arms were black+blue from being pinched. What it also means is that our Sweet Pea was now able to hold food on their own by grasping it between their thumb and their pointer finger.
  3. Sweet Pea has lost their tongue-thrust reflex and could move food to the back of their mouth without choking on it.  The tongue-thrust reflex is great for exclusive breastfeeding.  Until the Sweet Pea can differentiate between using it to breastfeed and not using it when they are going to have solids, then all you are going to get is solid food everywhere except inside your Sweet Pea.

Personally, I am not a fan of commercial baby cereals that are full of ingredients that I cannot pronounce without breaking down every syllable.  Rest assured, choosing the alternatives are not as time-consuming as you would imagine...

Here are some sites that have helpful information about introducing solids:


  • Baby-Led Weaning website teaches parents how to feed solids without making purees or buying jar food - simply whole food from you to your baby

  • Annabel Karmel - books available at Modern Mommy Boutique in Chandler if you are local to Phoenix

I hope this helps answer the question of about knowing if your Sweet Pea is ready for solids.  

Ready to read more?
You can read our food chronicle with Otter HERE.

Q&A with SPB: What do I feed my Sweet Pea after breastfeeding? HERE

Disclaimer: 
The material included in this video is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The viewer should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and video contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.
 
Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, 

Food Chronicle: Angelika ~ Week 3

Posted on June 12, 2012 at 10:22 AM Comments comments (0)
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonPhoto: The last of our peaches...so happy our baby got our home-grown produce!
 
This is the third installment in my Introduction to Solids series.  I am journaling about our experience with baby feeding since we have the unique opportunity to share this with our students and readers as we start the process of weaning our youngest child. 

This is not medical advice, nor is it a schedule to be followed.  It is simply our choice for our baby and the first time we have done what is gaining popularity as “baby-led weaning”.
 
Click on these links for Week 1 and Week 2.
 
There are two benefits I have already noticed from our choice to feed Angelika whole food pieces instead of starting her with cereals and purees.
 
No choking yet:  Babies that learn to eat whole food pieces learn to chew, as opposed to children who start with soft, mushy foods that learn to swallow.  I cannot find the source where I originally read this – it makes so much sense! (When I find it, I will post the link.) 
 
Knowing that I wanted to start her with “true” solids, I waited for some developmental markers to start feeding.  She did not start getting table food until she could get into and stay in a seated position on her own, and I watched for the pincer grip.  As it turns out, she practiced that on me – my bruised breasts and my arms were proof that our baby could probably pinch to grasp food, among other things.

We had scary choking experiences with our other three children – mostly involving things like tortilla chips, which we have a lot of in the southwest!  She grabbed a tortilla chip out of my hand last Wednesday, and managed to eat it without choking.
 
If your child does choke – click here for some visuals with instructions.
 
Less time in the kitchen:  I would spend two days per month preparing vegetable purees when we started feeding our boys.  Baking, steaming, pureeing, freezing, storing…it was time consuming!  As a mother to four kiddos, that is just not a reality right now.  Now I can bake or steam a few things as we make our own food and use it as we need it and have a couple of days of food that can be reheated.
 
I may revisit pureeing as our lifestyle allows for more kitchen time again.  It was well worth it to know that the food for them was whole and preservative free, and there was the side benefit of having purees to use in other foods.  The rest of us benefited from vegetables in baked goods and sauces; I even mixed them into the cheese and “melted” veggies into quesadillas.
 
Weekly update:
This week we introduced two new vegetables – carrots and peas.  Although Angelika has been handling a whole, peeled carrot as a teether, she had not eaten carrot before.  She loved them – pretty much attacked the food as it was making its way to her plate!  She also ate the peas with enthusiasm.
 
Angelika is doing much better getting the food into her mouth, instead of wearing it or tossing it.  Her diapers are showing us how much she is able to digest – there are still some pieces coming out whole, so to me it looks like her body is still learning to process the food.
 
Her bowel movements have been on and off again – some days they come in the morning as expected, other days none at all.  I am still backing off on solids until I see confirmation that her body is processing; then I go back to offering food at least twice a day.
 
She also had a diaper rash last week that made me nervous (she rarely gets rashes).  After a KST check by our chiropractor, he shared that it doesn’t seem to be food related.  Since she is still teething, he said that the increase in fluid production has changed the ph in her body.  I am going to follow his recommendation to add a dash of baking soda to her drink cup and see if that will clear up the rash.
 
That is it for our update this week.  I plan on introducing bananas and continuing with peas and carrots this week.  We will also revisit avocados.  If all goes well, we may try some baked apple.  I’ll wait and see how hot it gets in Arizona this week and decide if it’s worth it to turn on the oven.
 
I would love to hear from you – what is your experience with baby-led weaning?  How does it compare with feeding choices you have made for other children?
 
 
Food+ Diary
Monday, June 4
Little solid poop – about the size of a U.S. half-dollar
Veggie straws
Sweet potatoes and yams for lunch
 
Tuesday, June 5
U.S. nickel-sized poop at wake up
Lunch – some sweet potato and yam pieces – played more than ate
Epic diaper after lunch
Dinner – Avocado
 
Wednesday, June 6
BM in the am
Breakfast: peaches
Lunch:  yam/sweet potato
Dinner: - 1 tortilla chip
 
Thursday, June 7
No BM yet
Breakfast: Apple (teether), peaches
Lunch: Carrot teether
Dinner: 15 pieces of yams/sweet potatoes
 
Friday, June 8
No BM today!
Breakfast – peaches
Lunch – 4 veggie straws
 
Saturday, June 9
AM – 4 veggie straws
Lunch – GF graham cracker pieces
Dinner – steamed peas and carrots
BM – big one at night
 
Sunday, June 10
BM in the morning and early afternoon
Lunch – peas and carrots
Dinner – veggie straws
 
Monday, June 11
No BM
Breakfast – Apple teether
Lunch – 0
Dinner – veggie straws

Choking Link:
http://www.babyledweaning.com/2012/baby-led-weaning-diary-and-its-goodbye-from-siobhan-and-some-stuff-about-choking/
 
Disclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.