Shopping Cart
Your Cart is Empty
Quantity:
Subtotal
Taxes
Shipping
Total
There was an error with PayPalClick here to try again
CelebrateThank you for your business!You should be receiving an order confirmation from Paypal shortly.Exit Shopping Cart

Sweet Pea Births

Chandler, Arizona

Sweet Pea Births

...celebrating every swee​t pea their birth

Blog

Wordless Wednesday: Eat A Rainbow

Posted on March 6, 2014 at 11:22 AM Comments comments (0)
Mother Nature provides an amazing variety of foods for us to choose from.  I was so excited to discover that between our refrigerator, garden and freezer, our Sweet Peas could eat all the colors of the rainbow - all fresh foods without food coloring :)

The next goal is to find as many vegetables as we have fruits in our food selection - we tend to stick to carrots, broccoli and lettuce that we grow...time to grow their palette instead of try to do better the next time we do this theme!

Check out THIS post from MSU to read about all the health benefits and nutrients that each color provides.

watermelon & garden-fresh tomatoes...other red fruits we like that were not in the fridge: apples, strawberries, raspberries

tangelo, orange, peach

lemon, apple, banana

kiwi; recently the kiddos discovered they like star fruit! 
another staple we love is avocado

blueberries: we usually have these fresh and frozen

red seedless grapes; we also have blackberries when they are in season

In our pantry:
apple-sweetened cranberries ~ sprinkle on oatmeal
currants ~ sprinkle on oatmeal or salads
goji berries ~ soak them and use them in smoothies

The veggies the kiddos enjoy:

fresh lettuce from our garden

broiled acorn squash ~ I usually puree this and add it to tomato sauce in their pizza, or to egg scramble


What are the rainbow colors that are popular in your family?

Disclaimer:
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation. This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


Winterize Your Body

Posted on November 8, 2013 at 8:27 AM Comments comments (0)
The Winter months are upon us in the Northern Hemisphere...and not every pregnant or breastfeeding mama wants to get a flu shot.  Whether or not the flu shot is for you, here are some practical immunity-boosting tips from our favorite chiropractor that don't involve shots, sprays or otherwise:
 
It is that time of year...getting ready for winter. We prepare the pool for winter, the car, the furnace, even our grass changes. We prepare the cabin and the toilets up north for winter. Doesn't it make sense to prepare our bodies for winter?
 
As the weather switches from warm to cold, nature goes through a preparation for the change. At this same time our bodies also have to go through a physiological change. Through the summer our bodies did not have to spend much energy on making or storing body heat. Now, it has to spend more energy on the making of body heat to keep all the systems at the correct temperature.
 
It's important to understand that our bodies are a "closed system" in terms of energy. What this means is that our body only has so much energy available internally to do all of the functions of the body. If the body needs more energy in one area it has to take that energy from another area. For example, when you get sick you often feel tired. This is because the body moves energy to the immune system, and away from other less important functions which are then shut down or minimized. Eat a large meal and watch your energy level drop...as the body takes energy to digest the meal, the available energy for other functions drops.
 
So it is this time of year for our bodies. As the hypothalamus in the brain changes the body's physiology for body heat maintenance, other areas have less energy available to do their jobs. This is one of the reasons behind the cold and flu season. When the immune system has less energy available you are more vulnerable to virus and bacteria. It's not that there are more virus and bacteria necessarily, because they are around us all the time. It's when the body is unable to fight the germs that we manifest as sick. This is truly the main factor for illness. It's why when three people are exposed to the same virus, bacteria, etc., one gets sicker than a dog, one is a bit sick and one has no apparent symptoms. The internal environment of the body to fight has a major factor to whether your exposure to a pathogen turns into an illness.
 
So, what do you do? (For those of you with children, this also applies to them as well!)



 
The most important factor is maximizing your body's internal forces. There are many ways to do this. Here are four:
 
1.     Slow life down. We keep the same hectic rate in life, non-stop. When you are at full potential the body will try to adapt to the pace. But throw another stressor into the mix and watch the body get down and possibly sick. At this time of year, if you don't have to - DON'T. Another shopping trip? NO. Another late night when you don't have to - DON'T. Spend some family time away from the TV. Read a relaxing book. Listen to some relaxing music. Take a walk.
 
2.     Watch the foods you eat. With less fruits and vegetables available in the winter it is very important to make good choices. Your food is the raw power for all functions. Put high quality food in for high quality performance. Do you have to eat on the run? Try the salad instead of the burger (with vinaigrette, not the blue cheese). Drink water instead of soda or coffee. Put down the candy bar and have an apple instead. Processed foods as well as sugars are hard on the body. Eat less of them. It is that simple. We should eat 7-14 servings of fruits and vegetables daily. If you can't (or won't), I suggest JuicePlus every day. (Order at DoctorRoss.JuicePlus.com or in the office).
 
3.     Take some vitamins. Extra vitamin C daily is great. A few thousand milligrams a day as an adult is fine. If you get loose bowels back off a bit. (It is water soluble so any extra will go out with the urine.) If you are sick, Echinacea helps to boost the immune system. There is a great liquid for kids with the brand name "Herbs for Kids". Read the label for amounts. "Kyolic" brand garlic is great. It is often called nature's penicillin. Double your JuicePlus if getting sick. Also, take the much overlooked essential fatty acid supplement, Omega 3 fatty acids (The good fats). Vitamin D3 is also important in the winter (we have D-Dots at the office). Investigate other immune system boosters.
 
4.    SLEEP. Most Americans are sleep deprived. We are too busy to slow down and sleep. Sleep is the time that the body recuperates and repairs from the damages of the day. If we don't slow down and sleep we never let the body get caught up. Is it any wonder we keep getting sicker instead of healthier? Run a humidifier at night to increase moisture and help keep mucous membranes moist.
 
Take a few precautions and get proactive and you will be amazed that you don't have to be a victim of the "cold and flu season". Let's stay healthy together and make a healthier community and a healthier world!
 
About the Author:  Dr. Kevin Ross is a Tempe chiropractor with a family and pediatric wellness practice. He has completed over 160 hours of pediatric chiropractic continuing education, and is trained in the KST Technique. Any questions on natural health and additional ways to build the internal power of the body can be answered at (480) 730-7950.

What do you do to boost immunity during the winter months? 
Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 

 
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


 


3 Whole Food Tips

Posted on June 25, 2013 at 6:48 PM Comments comments (0)
We talk about avoiding harmful substances in pregnancy in order to help keep mom and baby healthy and low-risk.  I had an epiphany moment a few months ago, and ever since then we have been diligent about avoiding food dyes.  THIS post on BuzzFeed really got me thinking.  I have mentioned it before, and I will link to it again HERE :  when the FDA approves something, it is not approving that it is safe.  It is simply affirming that the approved dose is not going to kill you in that one ingestion.  It says nothing about the long-term effects exposure to the dye or chemical.

So with all this information out there on what you can’t eat, what can an expectant mom eat?  How are you supposed to eat well when you have a dozen things on your to-do list that have to be done before the day is over? 

The transition from buying ready-to-eat food at the grocery store to making most of your food at home can be overwhelming.  Here are some ideas that have worked for us.  In addition, I listed some foods that we discovered as we strove to have healthier pregnancies as we learned more about what good, whole food nutrition really is.

1.  Reading Labels  
The big two I look for are the fillers and the preservatives.  Ideally, the food you buy will have neither.  If something has soy lecithin or maltodextrine in it, the manufacturer has augmented what you think you are buying.  In my experience, most preservatives end in –ate: nitrates, benzoates.  HERE is a good list of food additives you can learn to avoid.  It’s not impossible to learn the list.  In the days before smart phones, I would write down ingredients to avoid on an index card. Over time, the list became familiar and I have most of it committed to memory.  A good rule of thumb is that if you can’t pronounce it, you probably shouldn’t eat it.

2.  Eating Whole Foods: Less is More 
I used to work out of the home.  As a newlywed couple, it was easy to go out to eat dinner, and making a full gourmet meal was do-able because there were no other demands on my time other than working and making meals for the two of us.  Then Puma was born, and I wanted to keep working.  The days of spending two hours or more in the kitchen getting a meal together were over for me.  I started taking shortcuts, like buying canned goods and processed foods that would help me throw a meal together in minutes.  Does that sound like your story?

Along came Night Owl, who despite having a healthy pregnancy and an unmedicated hospital birth, ended up with a whole bunch of food allergies.  He is allergic to wheat, eggs, peanuts, soy, hazelnuts, coconut, soy and watermelon.  Watermelon and hazelnuts aren’t such a big deal – it’s easy to avoid those.  The others – not so much.  Thanks to him, we got started on the path back to a healthy, whole food diet. 

We found a source for free-range meats.  We eat just about everything from scratch again – we are blessed with a nanny that loves to cook and she only knows how to cook from scratch.  The only prepared food we buy is our gluten-free tortillas and pastas.  In an effort to eliminate foods that have more than ten ingredients in them, things that we used to buy for a quick snack are slowly being phased out: gluten-free crackers and pretzels are not making it into the shopping cart as often.  We are replacing them with dried cranberries and dried currants.

We also make our own soups and stocks.  If you look at the ingredients in store-bought soups, they are very high in sodium and additives.  It takes 10-20 minutes to wash and chop the vegetables for a basic stock; then you throw them into a big stockpot with olive oil, water and spices.  I like to use sea salt (my latest "favorite" is pink Himalayan sea salt), tarragon, garlic powder and a bay leaf or two, depending on how much water I have.  We add in chicken bones for the meat eaters so they get etxtra calcium in their stock.  Once the stocks are made, we can use them throughout the week for making soups, rice, and pasta.

3.  Snacks and Side Dishes: Plan Ahead  
There are a couple of options when it comes to eating fresh fruits and vegetables.  You can buy a whole bunch and pray you use them all before they go bad, and with meal planning, this is more likely to work for you.  If you are not a meal planner, do you have time to stop at the store every few days to load up on the produce you know you will eat?  We use the EWG Dirty Dozen list to decide how to spend our grocery money.  We believe that it is worth it to buy the most contaminated crops in the organic section instead of conventional.  We buy conventional produce when the crops are lower on the pesticide list.

Once we get the produce home, I prepare what we can wash ahead:  citrus, apples, mangoes, avocados; basically, almost anything with a hard shell.  I will wash and peel carrots, then slice them and put them in a container with some water.  You can do this with celery as well.  Voila!  Now I have grab and go snacks for the times that I am in a hurry and don’t have time to prepare an elaborate snack before we head out the door.

We still buy grapes, berries and peaches in season.  By purchasing them in season, we find they keep longer.  Those we wash right before they are going to be eaten, and enjoy them when we are snacking or eating at home.

All these ready-to-go snacks only take a minute to prepare ahead or right before you eat.  Getting used to preparing them during your pregnancy will set you up for a good habit postpartum.  As long as baby doesn’t have a reaction to them, you are training yourself to have a good breastfeeding diet in the postpartum period. 

Other good grab and go snacks are nuts.  Throw them together with dried cranberries and currants and we have a homemade snack sack.  Reality check: even that takes time we don’t have some days.  If you have a Trader Joe’s near you, check out their “Just A Handful” selections.  All of them are good; most of them are healthy.  We splurge on the handful bags that come with some chocolate chunks in them! 

Another time saver are the low-ingredient snack bars: Larabar, That’s it fruit bars, and pure organic bars.  These all have seven or less ingredients and they don’t have soy or cane sugar.  Snacks are a big part of the postpartum period since the constant feeding the first two to three months is conducive to a mama with a monstrous appetite!

As far as veggies for lunch and dinner, we choose to shop our local farmer’s markets so we can support the small farmers around us.  You can ask the farmer directly about their growing methods.  Another possibility might be to save money by visiting them and picking your own produce.

What if that isn’t an option, or you don’t like the variety at your market?  Choosing frozen vegetables from a reputable food company are sometimes higher in essential vitamins and nutrients because they are picked and frozen at peak freshness.  They are economical, and they add a nice variety to your diet.  I remember being less interested in making choices in the later weeks of pregnancy.  It feels like you can’t possibly get any bigger at the end of your pregnancy, all movements are taxing, and having something easy to fix is a blessing!

You can make enough green salad to last three days and dress it with a citrus-based dressing to make sure it keeps.  It may take some trial and error to find a dressing that works without being too runny.  My favorite one is *surprise* homemade.  I learned it from Danielle del Castillo-Hughes at a "Greens" class.  You simply throw all these ingredients together in a blender or Cuisinart and then toss it into your salad: two avocadoes, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, apple cider vinegar, tahini, garlic, brewer’s yeast, salt, cumin, and the juice from one lemon.

I hope these three points give you an idea how you can start to transition to a more whole food diet.  I wish that yours is a decision that is pedestrian and not food allergy driven.  While having a child with food allergies is one of the best things that ever happened to our family, it was a steep learning curve.  Best wishes to you on your whole food journey!

What are some of your time-saving whole food tips?

Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer:  
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


An Inside Look: Blue Russ Holistic Health Coaching

Posted on June 2, 2013 at 12:22 AM Comments comments (1)

I am pleased to introduce you to Blue Russ today.  She is a certified Holistic Health Coach, trained at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, where she studied over 100 dietary theories and a wide range of coaching techniques. She is your calm, gentle guide, supporting you to achieve your goals with confidence and grace. No counting calories or grams of nutrients. No judgment. No food is off limits. No deprivation. She believes that we have all the wisdom and healing power we need. The best healers are the ones that enable us to reawaken it. She is ready to guide you to reawaken your power.

Blue is also a homebirth mother of two with a passion for health and life. She's been told it is contagious.

Learn more and sign up for tips and recipes at www.blueruss.com. You can also follow her on Facebook at Blue Russ Health Coaching and Twitter  @BlueRussHealth


How did you get started in the field of nutrition?
I've been fascinated by food since I was first allowed to cook as a child. The endless flavor combinations! As a teenager, I was without dairy for a year when my family lived in Africa. When we returned, I went straight for a glass of milk and immediately my stomach cramped up. I had considered this sensation normal as a child and it was then I made the connection between food and health. I went on to experiment with different foods and learn more about the connection between what I ate and how I felt. When I was pregnant the first time, I learned even more, reading every book on pregnancy health I could get my hands on. Equally strong passions for me are health and social justice. It is a clear calling for me to be a healer and my aspirations are to change the world one mother at a time.

What is your favorite part of what you do?
I have so many favorite parts! The spark in a client's eye as they articulate exactly what their next step is, the one they are ready for, the one that will change everything. The relief in a mother's voice when her children or husband actually enjoy their green veggies. Helping women connect with each other, sparking lively, life-changing conversation. The learning and growing I experience with every single session and class. I could go on and on…

How does a family participate in your services?
My specialty is moms: Fertility, pregnancy, motherhood and grandmotherhood. I have also worked with couples, which is wonderful, but I primarily work with moms. Moms tend to be the leaders of the family and over time everyone follows their healthy example.

My philosophy is that guilt, blame, shame, calorie counting and strict dieting all lead to needless suffering. It is through understanding and honoring ourselves that we make quality choices. I see my role as facilitating and strengthening the connection a mother has with her inner wisdom.

In practical terms, I offer one-on-one health coaching, cooking classes, workshops and online programs. All are designed to help moms reach a higher level of health and joy in their lives. The transformations I witness are beyond belief - I've supported women through ending their sugar addiction, taking control of their children's health, losing weight, changing careers, finally finding true love and much more.

My favorite is working with women one-on-one in my 6-month program. This gives her the chance to take it step by step, avoid overwhelm and we have time to explore all areas of her life. I consider primary foods to be what's going on her life, not what she eats. Primary foods include relationships, physical activity, career and spirituality. If these areas of life are not simultaneously addressed, even the most perfect diet will do nothing to improve her health.

How can you help a family when they are expecting?
I love working with pregnant women! They are motivated to be healthy and their choices truly do effect the next generation. When she feels her best, and her primary foods are in order, baby gets the best start. I offer a variety of programs from a one week whole foods cleanse that is safe for pregnancy and nursing to a 6 week group program to a 6 month one-on-one program.

Do you offer any classes for postpartum health?
Yes! In addition to my other program options, I have a new offering just for the postpartum period! I call it "Eat Well for Two" and it involves a day of food prep, recipes, pantry make-over and health strategy session, all in the comfort of the new mother’s home.

How do you coach a family through first foods and starting solids?
There are a variety of ways to introduce solids into a baby’s diet. Each family is different and I work with their unique situation to discover what is best. In general, breastfeeding for as long as possible and introducing foods at about 6 months is best. Most babies experiment with food long before they are ready to eat it. I say let them at it! I see my role as assisting parents in listening to their intuition and baby’s cues in order to confidently introduce foods. I offer information and recommendations but ultimately it has to feel right within the family!

How can we get our family to eat healthy greens that we know we are supposed to eat - the variety and the scope can be so intimidating!
So glad you asked about greens! I am passionately in love with greens. This was not always the case, but experimenting with recipes to find the ones I enjoy has been the key. I love to spread the green joy. In fact, I offer an entire week of recipes and support through my online program, “A Week of Greens.” I worked with a mom who used to choke down spinach because she knew it was good for her. Now she actually looks forward to delicious salads and cooked greens every day! The next Week of Greens will be offered in November.

Is there anything else our families should know about your services, and the classes you offer?
I am passionate about helping moms live a vibrant life. Being a mother may be the most challenging job in the world, but it is also the most enjoyable when mom is at her best - not to mention the ripple effect into the next generation and the planet! It's not about guilt, it's about power. We have the power to make the world better than we found it!

I encourage all moms to go to my website, check me out and sign up for my e-newsletter to get tips, recipes and event invitations.
Right now I am offering a free menu planner to all new subscribers, available immediately when you sign up!

When a mom feels ready to take steps to improve her life, I am ready to support her with a free health strategy session that can be done by phone, Skype or in person at my Phoenix and Chandler offices.

Do you have on-line options for clients who are not able to join a class in person?
I offer four different programs online throughout the year. The next one starts on June 10 and is called “Vegan for a Week.” Having a menu plan, recipes, shopping list and group support will go a long way to increase participants’ vegetable intake. I’m not 100% vegan myself nor am I interested in pushing any single diet, but I do think that there are several dietary theories that are worth exploring, including the vegan diet.

I also offer webinars from time to time. The best way to be up to date on my online offerings is to sign up for my newsletter at

Thank you for taking the time to give us an Inside Look, Blue.  I really enjoyed learning more about how a health coach works.  I just had my first session and it was transformational!  Anyone can take advantage of a complimentary session with Blue by contacting her to set a date for your personal health strategy session.

Phone:  480.273.6140
               
Have you ever considered a health coach? What would you get help with?
 Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 
*I think* that the amount of traffic you so generously generate has led to a lot of spam posting.  In an effort to keep the spam to a minimum, I am taking the time to moderate comments now.
 
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


Nutrition Information Expanded

Posted on March 26, 2013 at 5:40 PM Comments comments (0)
Nutrition Class: Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson Last Friday we had the class that is dedicated to Nutrition in Pregnancy.  We decided to switch it up a little bit.  Instead of showing the video of Dr. Brewer addressing one of Marjie and Jay Hathaway’s classes in California (yes, they still teach and if you are in the Sherman Oaks area, they can be your teachers!), we invited one of our students who has an avocation for nutrition to share her knowledge with the class.

R. is fully committed to providing the best nutrition for her family, and she is also married to a CPA.  She knows how to buy quality organic food at the best prices!!  She shops across town.  I am encouraging her to write us a shopping list for the Phoenix area.

Here are some of the “new” things that we heard about outside of the Brewer Diet that we teach.  Dr. Brewer’s foundation is good and as reliable as ever.  Now there is a new consciousness about organic and alternative sources that adds a new layer to a healthy and low-risk pregnancy.  We want to make our students aware that there are options to conventional foods: for example, eating meat and dairy products that are hormone and anti-biotic free, looking for non-genetically modified crops, and ancient foods that are "new" to our Western diet. 

If you have watched any of the food documentaries like Food, Inc., or Forks Over Knives, you know that what we call food and what is really food are two different things.  If you haven’t watched them, here is a quick synopsis:  unless you know and/or trust the source, there is no guarantee that what you are eating is actually wholesome.

I am going to break down some of the food groups on our “pink sheets” that she expanded on.  She shared some additional considerations for pregnant mothers.  I wanted to write about her presentation as a reminder for our students who were in class and for any mamas that are interested in a high protein, whole food diet during their pregnancy.

As a baseline, HERE are the recommendations from The Bradley Method® that every Bradley™ instructor should be sharing with their students.  These nutritional guidelines are taken from Dr. Brewer’s information on how to reduce toxemia of pregnancy by increasing protein and eating a well-balanced diet.

Dairy: Four serving per day
The main goal for consuming four servings of protein per day is to add calcium for bone building and protein for brain building to the diet.  If you don’t like milk or are allergic to milk, R.’s favorite alternative is almond milk since almonds are not typically a genetically modified crop.  She also provided our students with THIS list of the Top 10 Calcium-Rich Foods. 

If you do eat dairy, she suggested to stay away from the DHA-fortified varieties since there is not enough in there to make a difference, and a lot of processing has to happen in order to infuse the milk with DHA.  As an example, you can explore THIS article. 

“Good” dairy choices include greek yogurt and organic cheeses.

Eggs: Two per day
The benefits of eggs are many.  You can click HERE for a breakdown of nutrients from A to Zinc.  If you are allergic to eggs, that post list alternatives for getting those nutrients through other foods.  R. offered links for our students to learn more about LUTEIN and CHOLINE, two nutrients found in eggs that are super-important for that ever-developing baby brain.  If you just can’t stomach eggs, read away and maybe you will be motivated to find at least a couple of egg dishes you can tolerate so that baby has all the brain-building advantages available to him or her.

Protein: Two Servings Per Day
R.’s recommendation was to find protein sources that were either free-range and eating what nature intended (i.e., cows are supposed to eat grass, not corn), or to eat alternative sources that are not genetically modified.  Many people gravitate to tofu if they don’t eat meat.  Unfortunately, soy is one of the most likely crops to be genetically modified.  Legumes and quinoa are two alternative sources that her family uses if she is not preparing free-range poultry or beef. 

Another way she adds protein to her family’s diet is by making her own chicken broth.  She boils a whole chicken for two hours.  Then she removes the chicken and strips the meat from the bones.  Next, she returns the bones to the stock along with two tablespoons of vinegar to maximize the calcium leaching from the bones.  She simmers this for 12 hours, and this stock is the base for all her cooking for the rest of the week.  You can use stock for soups and as the liquid when cooking your legumes and grains.

Green Vegetables: Two servings per day
The main nutrient Dr. Brewer intended for mamas to get from leafy greens was folate, which is required for many of the body’s functions: DNA synthesis and repair, cell division, and cell growth.  In pregnancy, folate is very important for proper fetal development.  Leafy greens are also rich in iron.  Iron is also important for fetal growth and maternal health.

HERE  is the list R. shared for the Top 10 Foods Highest in Folate.

Other highlights from her talk:

One of the best sources for lutein & choline: Animal liver, especially the beef and chicken varieties.  Liver does have a checkbox on our Dr. Brewer “pink sheets”.  It is not a very common menu item these days, so it was neat to hear her expound on the benefits of adding it into the pregnancy diet and beyond.

Chia seeds: Easy to add to drinks, smoothies, sprinkle on oatmeal or salads for extra protein and Omega-3 fatty acids.

Egg shells:  You can boil them for five minutes to kill any germs.  Let them cool and then pulverize them in your blender.  Once you have egg powder, it can also be added to smoothies or broths.

Broccoli tips:  what to do with the broccoli stalks that are plain and rarely served?  You can finely dice them and sprinkle them onto salads or into your sandwich.

Goji berries:  These little powerhouses are packed with phytonutrients, zinc, vitamin A, magnesium, vitamin E, vitamin C, calcium, beta-carotene, antioxidants, iron and B-complex.  You can eat them plain as a snack, put them in a shake or smoothie, or add it to trail mix.  

Lastly, HERE is a link to some of the local area Farmer's Markets in the Phoenix for you to explore and meet your local growers and foodies.

What are some alternative sources or “new” foods that you like?
Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted.  *I think* that the amount of traffic you so generously generate has led to a lot of spam posting.  In an effort to keep the spam to a minimum, I am taking the time to moderate comments now.

LINK LIST
Dr. Brewer/ The Bradley Method® Pregnancy Nutrition
http://www.bradleybirth.com/diet.aspx

More information about Dr. Brewer’s
http://www.drbrewerpregnancydiet.com/

Eggs
http://www.nutritionandeggs.co.uk/basic/vitamins-and-minerals-within-egg

Top 10 Foods Highest in Calcium
http://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/foods-high-in-calcium.php

Challenge to Horizon Organic’s DHA Fortified Milk
http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/03/challenge-to-horizon-organics-new-dha-fortified-milk/#.UVIEW1s_8hM

Lutein
http://luteininfo.com/whereraw

Choline
http://www.cholineinfo.org/healthcare_professionals/foods_recipes.asp

Iron
http://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/foods-high-in-folate-vitamin-B9.php
   
Arizona Community Farmers Markets
http://www.arizonafarmersmarkets.com/

Disclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

Chocolate Can Be A Yes!

Posted on December 7, 2012 at 12:25 PM Comments comments (0)
Lisa from Wei of Chocolate - chocolate seems to decrease the risk for pre-eclampsiaWhat - chocolate doesn't have to be a guilty secret during your pregnancy!

Probably not IF you find a high quality,additive free dark chocolate!  (P.S. I have a source for you to try...pictured to the left is Lisa Reinhardt from Wei of Chocolate - heaven in your mouth)



The "traditional" concerns with chocolate during pregnancy:

  • They can be empty calories - lots of empty calories not good long term for a healthy weight gain.
  • Chocolate is a hidden source of caffeine - not good in high quantity during pregnancy (more than 200 mg/day*).
  • Conventional chocolate processing takes out the good cacao butter (candymakers can sell it for profit) and replaces it with soy lecithin (concerns about GMO, estrogen content).


Well, here is the scoop!  I am on my way out the door - here are some links for you to peruse and to ponder.

The biggest deal for me from this reading list?  Chocolate intake seems to be tied to a decrease in a pregnant mother's risk for pre-eclampsia.  WOW!!!

Chocolate has been shown to be a positive factor in pregnancy
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20609337

Chocolate has health benefits during pregnancy
http://suite101.com/article/chocolate-in-pregnancy-a105931

Here is our source for fair-trade, vegan chocolate that keeps all the good stuff in, plus the added benefits of flower essences:
http://www.weiofchocolate.com/

As per the caffeine info below, one piece of dark chocolate per day is well below the 200/mg per day max!!

What do you think about adding chocolate to your pregnancy diet?

*Caffeine During Pregnancy
More about caffeine levels during pregnancy from
http://www.healthlibrary.com/healthwise.php
(You can find this info if you search for "Caffeine During Pregnancy" in their database.)

"Caffeine is the most frequently used drug during pregnancy. In small amounts, caffeine is considered safe for the fetus. It's a good idea to keep your caffeine intake below 200 mg a day because:
  • More caffeine may be connected to a higher rate of miscarriage. There is not enough evidence to know for sure.
  • Caffeine is a diuretic, meaning it makes you urinate more often. This can cause you to lose important minerals, including calcium.
  • Caffeine can interfere with sleep for both you and your fetus.

Avoid caffeine, or limit your intake to about 1 cup of coffee or tea each day.

Caffeine can be found in many types of drinks and in chocolate. The amount of caffeine in your coffee or tea can depend on the serving size, the brand, or how it was brewed.

Coffee drinks such as a 16-oz mocha can have 175 mg of caffeine, and a 12-oz regular coffee can have as much as 260 mg of caffeine. Tea can have 30 mg to 130 mg of caffeine in a 12-oz cup. An ounce of milk chocolate can have 1 mg to 15 mg of caffeine, and dark chocolate can have 5 mg to 35 mg of caffeine. Many soft drinks and energy drinks also have caffeine.

It is important to keep track of your caffeine intake throughout the day. Check the label if you do not know how much caffeine is in your drink or chocolate bar. Talk to your doctor about caffeine and nutrition during pregnancy."

Disclaimer:  
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.