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Sweet Pea Births

Chandler, Arizona

Sweet Pea Births

...celebrating every swee​t pea their birth

Blog

VBAC: The BIG picture of the risks

Posted on April 24, 2015 at 9:58 AM Comments comments (0)
Uterine Rupture.   

If you have had a previous cesarean, this is THE “drop” word for many care providers when they have their “informed consent” talk with patients for consequent pregnancies.

Today I want to take a look at several other complications related to labor and delivery.  If your care provider is expecting you to be influenced by risk factors for uterine rupture, I think it is fair to look at all the other risk factors of pregnancy and labor in order to create a bigger picture and put things into perspective.

Pregnancy is generally considered a healthy time in a woman’s life.  In order to make life, the woman’s body has to be able to support that life.  In most cases, it is healthy women who become pregnant.  What do we have to be afraid of?  In most cases: nothing.  However, as with many if not all things in life, there is a certain level of risk, and yes, sometimes things go wrong.

So let’s start with the risk numbers for uterine rupture.  Read THIS blog post for an in depth look at the numbers.  Here is the summary of the incidence of uterine rupture, depending on what category you fall in:
 

  • Unscarred Uterus: 0.0033% (primigravidas) to 0.0051% (multigravidas)
  • VBAC: .5% - .7% 
  • VBA2C: 1.7%  (vaginal birth after 2 cesareans) 
  • VBAMC: 1.2%  (vaginal birth after multiple cesareans) 
  • Previous VBAC: .4% - .5%  (if you had a previous successful VBAC) 
  • VBAC + Augmented labor:  .9%  (stats for first attempt) 
  • VBAC + Induced labor: 1%  (stats for first attempt) 


So what are your risks of other complications of labor?





True statisticians are going to take issue with this oversimplification of comparisons.  In recognition that a percentage is more than its face value, here are the ratios and the sources for my information:

Postpartum Hemorrhage:  1/5 – .2000 – 20%
Definition:  “Postpartum hemorrhage is traditionally defined as blood loss greater than 500 mL during a vaginal delivery or greater than 1,000 mL with a cesarean delivery. However, significant blood loss can be well tolerated by most young healthy females, and an uncomplicated delivery often results in blood loss of more than 500 mL without any compromise of the mother's condition.” Quoted from Medscape  
 
“The incidence of postpartum hemorrhage is about 1 in 5 pregnancies, but this figure varies widely due to differential definitions for postpartum hemorrhage.” 
Stat SOURCE

Preterm labor and preterm delivery: 1/9 – .1111 – 11.11%
Definition: Baby born before 37 weeks
Stat SOURCE

Post-Maturity: 3-6%
Definition:  pregnancy past 42 weeks in which the placenta cannot provide the nourishment to maintain a healthy fetus
“The incidence of postdates ranges from 3 - 12% of all pregnancies. If the pregnancy is dated using ultrasound criteria, the incidence of post-dates is lower and ranges from 3 - 6%. Only 1 - 4% of all pregnancies continue to 43 weeks.”
Stat & Quote SOURCE

Breech presentation: 3-4 % of all deliveries
Definitions of the types of breech:
Frank breech (50 – 70% of all breeches): In a frank breech, the baby's buttocks lead the way into the pelvis; the hips are flexed, the knee extended (pike position).

Complete breech (5 – 10% of all breech): In a complete breech, both knees and hips are flexed, and the baby's buttocks or feet may enter the birth canal first (cannonball position).

Footling breech (10 – 30% of all breech): one or both feet lead the way.
Stat SOURCE for frank, complete, and footling breech birth

Transverse lie. A few babies lie horizontally in the uterus, called a transverse lie, which usually means the baby's shoulder will lead the way into the birth canal rather than the head.  1/500 –  .0020 – 0.20%
Stat SOURCE

Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes before 37 weeks: 3%
3% of all pregnancies and occurs in approximately 150,000 pregnancies yearly in the United States 
Stat SOURCE

Preeclampsia:  2% to 6%
Definition:  a condition of pregnancy in which the mother’s blood pressure starts to rise to dangerously high levels, the indicator for possibility of more complications that are potentially fatal to mother and/or baby; 2% to 6% in healthy, nulliparous women (women who have never given birth yet) 
Stat SOURCE

Placenta Abruptio: 1.0%
Definition:  the placenta separates from the uterine wall before delivery of the baby
“The frequency of abruptio placentae in the United States is approximately 1%, and a severe abruption leading to fetal death occurs in 0.12% of pregnancies (1:830).”
Stat & Quote SOURCE

UTERINE RUPTURE STATS FALL HERE

Umbilical cord prolapse: 1/300 – .0033 – 0.33%
Definition: the umbilical cord precedes the baby in the birth canal
Stat SOURCE

Placenta Accreta: 1/533 – .0018 – 0.18%
Definition:  the placenta grows too deeply through the uterine wall 
July 2012 study publication
Stat SOURCE

What do you think now that you have seen a wide array of complications and risks?
Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted.  
*I think* that the amount of traffic you so generously generate has led to a lot of spam posting.  In an effort to keep the spam to a minimum, I am taking the time to moderate comments now.

For more reading:
Uterine Rupture in Pregnancy: Article dated July 31, 2012

The Risks of Cesarean Section
http://www.motherfriendly.org/Resources/Documents/TheRisksofCesareanSectionFebruary2010.pdf

Disclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

Birth News RoundUp: January 30, 2014

Posted on January 30, 2014 at 8:11 PM Comments comments (0)
It has been a long winter break...finally getting back into reading and collecting the latest news around the web for you!  Some really interesting finds this week about new fertility options, the role of Vitamin D in pregnancy, and always, breastfeeding.  SO excited to learn that another state in the USA is making another push to protect breastfeeding MotherBabies with a breastfeeding protection code. In addition, Missouri is also adding to their breastfeeding laws to protect breastfeeding mothers from contempt of court if they can't serve jury duty.

FERTILITY
Vancouver's Olive Fertility Centre Introduces New Embryo Screening Shown to Increase IVF Success
"This technology allows us to improve the chances of a healthy pregnancy for our patients as well as being an invaluable research tool that enables us to collect new data on human embryo development," says Dr Jason Hitkari, a reproductive endocrinologist, UBC clinical professor, and medical director at Olive Fertility Centre. A major challenge with IVF is identifying the best embryo to transfer back to the mother’s womb.
PR Web - http://bit.ly/1locXB0

PREGNANCY
Vitamin D deficiency tied to severe pre-eclampsia
Women who are deficient in vitamin D in the first 26 weeks of their pregnancy may be at risk of developing severe pre-eclampsia, a potentially life-threatening disorder diagnosed by an increase in blood pressure and protein in the urine, according to research by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

“For decades, vitamin D was known as a nutrient that was important only for bone health,” said lead author Lisa Bodnar, PhD, MPH, RD, associate professor in Pitt Public Health’s Department of Epidemiology. “Over the past 10 to 15 years, scientists have learned that vitamin D has diverse functions in the body beyond maintaining the skeleton, including actions that may be important for maintaining a healthy pregnancy.”
Health24 - http://bit.ly/1fg9RYl

More About Vitamin D from National Institute of Health:
http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/

BIRTH
UCSD epidermal electronics patch pushes frontiers
The existing standard of prenatal monitoring involves bulky belts and wires that have to be hooked up to machines to detect and read out data. This means the technology is available only in hospital settings and requires expertise to use.
With the epidermal electronic patch, anyone with access to a smartphone, which Coleman noted outnumbers those with access to water in many developing countries, could monitor fetal heart rate and uterine contractions, among other metrics.
San Diego Source: http://bit.ly/1gui3t9

Simple Tech Creates Infant Warmer To Save Lives In Developing Countries
The Embrace infant warmer is small and light and looks like a miniature sleeping bag and is easily transported to rural villages. It uses a phase change material, a proprietary wax-like substance with the ability to maintain a constant temperature while still supplying heat to the baby. This allows the infant warmer to stay at a constant temperature (98.6 F/ 37 C) for up to six hours to maintain the babies’ body temperature. The infant warmer (miniature sleeping bag) absorbs heat from heater (phase change material) and slowly releases the heat over a period of time.  After four hours, the infant warmer can be re-warmed by submerging it in boiling water for a few minutes and the entire sleeping bag can be sanitized in boiling water.

Price difference? $300 USD compared to the $20,000 price tag of a traditional incubator.
Forbes – http://onforb.es/1lodWkG

Identifying Ways To Reduce First Cesarean
“Given the risks associated with the initial cesarean and its implications in subsequent pregnancies, the most effective approach to reducing overall morbidities related to cesarean delivery is to avoid the first cesarean,” explained Saade. “The implications of a cesarean rate of 30 percent or more—since approximately one in three pregnancies are delivered by cesarean—have significant effects on the medical system as well as on the health of women and children. It is essential to embrace this concern and provide guidance on strategies to lower the primary cesarean rate.”
Eurasia Review –  http://bit.ly/LukGx8

POSTPARTUM
Fear of childbirth linked to postpartum depression, study finds
Although a history of depression among expectant mothers remains the greatest single risk factor for postpartum depression, a new study finds that fear of childbirth may also predispose some women to the condition.
In a paper published Friday in the journal BMJ Open, researchers concluded that fear of childbirth increases the risk of postpartum depression about threefold in women without a history of depression, and fivefold in women with known depressive disease.
latimes.com – http://lat.ms/1bE3MCl


BABY
Drug approval in neonates; what to do? and what is this dexmedetty stuff?
Most of the drugs that we routinely use in neonatology do not have a specific license for neonatal use. This is true I think in every jurisdiction around the world, the USA, Canada, Australia, and Europe, but I don’t know enough about other parts of the world. In fact for most of the drugs that we use there is very little neonatal data that would allow licensing.
Neonatal Research http://bit.ly/1fqAmwr

Measuring brain activity in premature infants
"This new methodology has recently been used to investigate cortical processing of touch and speech sounds in a large group of full-term and preterm neonates," said Dr. Nathalie Maitre, one of the two researchers behind the experiment, "It has also been used to characterize the effect of neuro-rehabilitation in the brains of young children with cerebral palsy." Dr. Maitre also said that its application could lead to wider adaptations in treating infants and adolescents with brain injuries, for example, or in addressing abnormal sensory experiences in the neonatal period during intensive care hospitalization.
Medical Xpress – http://bit.ly/1aL0FOA


BREASTFEEDING
Missouri Senate bill would ban any municipality from restricting breastfeeding in public
The case stems from the Kansas City area where a young mom now sits in contempt of court for trying to be excused from jury duty because she wanted to stay home and breast feed her child.
Senate Bill 502 aims to excuse breastfeeding moms.  But there are catches - they must get a doctor’s note, and they have to be discreet.
"I wish it was better, I wish it didn't have the word discretion.  Why is that?  Because discretion is up to a person's discretion and it's not a good word for a law,” said Erin O’Reilly of La Leche League.
O’Reilly said judges in the city already give nursing mothers a break on jury duty but the rest of the state is a different story, even outside the courtroom.
St. Louis KMOV.com: http://bit.ly/1lod6V1

Breastfeeding bill advances
The House of Delegates Health Committee has passed a bill (H.B. 4335) legally establishing a woman’s right to breastfeed in public.  West Virginia is one of the only states that does not provide for that protection in code.

The legislation  has been introduced a number of times in recent years, but has failed to clear both houses.  During Wednesday’s committee meeting, Del. Barbara Fleischauer (D-Monongalia) urged lawmakers to approve it.
WV MetroNews – http://bit.ly/1lodjrf

New Line of Breast Pump Bags to Make Breastfeeding Easier for Working Moms
"Nurse Purse was born out of necessity," said Adrienne Frohlich, founder of Nurse Purse.  "When I returned to work as a busy Speech Language Pathologist commuting around New York City, I was frustrated with the lack of options to transport my breast pump.   As any Mom knows, carrying around multiple bags for multiple purposes is impractical and difficult – especially when navigatingNew York City public transportation.  I searched and searched for a single bag that would hold my coolers, pump accessories, work materials and personal items - and also look great.  When I couldn't find any viable alternatives, I knew there was need I could fill." 
Digital Journal http://bit.ly/Luf71K

Disclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson

Birth News This Week

Posted on November 29, 2013 at 7:08 PM Comments comments (0)

Hope our US readers are full and content after a day of feasting with family and friends.  We stayed away from the whole Black Friday frenzy and had a nice morning in the country :)

Here are the articles I read over the last few days that I thought might be of interest to you.  To keep up with all of the info we share, please follow us on Twitter and/or Pinterest.
 

Fertility
New Study: Link Between Using The Pill Form Of Birth Control And Glaucoma Risk - Fox 2 KFXV http://bit.ly/IqrSbz

Pregnancy
New study suggests that the steroid injections could potentially pose a risk to the baby http://bit.ly/1bnUY8h
 
Lifestyle Factors Linked To A Healthy Birth http://bit.ly/1b2bhl2

Carbon monoxide could hold promise of effective preeclampsia treatment, prevention - The Almagest http://bit.ly/1b2bHbg

Birth
Safe at Home? New Home Vs. Hospital Birth Study Reviewed by Henci Goer
Cheng and colleagues conclude that while women planning home births are less likely to experience obstetric intervention, their babies are more likely to be born in poor condition. Do their data warrant that conclusion?

To begin with, the relevant question isn’t the tradeoffs between planned home birth per se and hospital birth. It is: “What are the excess risks for healthy women at low risk of urgent complications who plan home birth with qualified home birth attendants compared with similar women planning hospital birth?” This study can’t answer that question. Here’s why:
Get the “WHY” at Science & Sensibility: http://bit.ly/185OUv3

Baby
No needles: new jaundice screening for preemies promises a smoother start in life
At medica - the world's largest medical trade fair, held in Dusseldorf - a new device has been unveiled that could help the smallest of babies make it through their first weeks.
Read the Sci-Tech @ DW for the rest of the story: http://bit.ly/1bnUjUn

Delayed umbilical cord clamping reduces complications: Alberta Health Services

Waiting only one minute to cut the umbilical cord for a pre-term baby greatly reduces complications, says Alberta Health Services.

“Now, in that minute before we clamp the cord, a baby takes his first breaths and pulls in some blood from the placenta. This extra blood stabilizes the baby’s blood pressure and it is thought that the stem cells help fight infection and repair damaged cells.”

European studies show that the delayed cord clamping also significantly reduces the risk of brain injury and hospital-acquired infection. And it cuts the need for blood pressure support in babies born between 22 and 36 weeks of gestational age.”

Read the rest at The Edmonton Sun: http://bit.ly/1e5sgI3

Patients celebrate B.C.'s decision to fund medical foods to protect against brain-threatening disease
"Canadian PKU and Allied Disorders (CanPKU) is delighted with the B.C. government's decision to provide funding for special low-protein medical foods for patients affected by Phenylketonuria (PKU) and similar inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs). Medical foods play a critical role in preventing devastating neurocognitive, psychiatric and physical symptoms, and in some cases even death, caused by PKU and 24 other rare, inborn metabolic disorders. The foods are one of three medical components of CanPKU'sComprehensive Brain Protection Strategy for People with PKU submitted to the B.C. government in February 2013."
The rest of the story on Newswire: http://bit.ly/IwypBp

Breastfeeding
Breastfeeding provides babies with iodine
"Iodine is essential for the human body. This trace element is especially crucial for infants in order to ensure healthy development. Iodine deficiency can disrupt growth and damage the nervous system. In iodine-poor regions, such as Switzerland with its iodine-deficient soils, iodised salt is recommended for use in cooking and the food industry. So newborns generally receive enough of the trace element through breast milk and baby food containing added iodine. However, iodised salt or supplemented baby food are not available everywhere, particularly in remote areas of developing countries, and do not always reach vulnerable segments of the population."
For the whole story visit Medical Xpress: http://bit.ly/1fGnqnS

Infants who are breastfed may also have a better diet in preschool
"A new study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reveals that infants who are breastfed may also have a better diet in preschool. This study combined four different groups from Britain, France, Portugal and Greece, totaling nearly 10,000 children. The goal was to try to understand how early breastfeeding practices affected fruit and vegetable intake in children 2- to 4-years-old."
Read the rest of the story from MSU:  http://bit.ly/1fGosjN

Kangaroo Care for Breastfeeding Babies
"It is only in recent history that Western society has drifted away from carrying their babies to a caring method where the baby is left lying on his or her own with scheduled feedings. This trend disrupts the bonding an infant has with his or her mother, and sends the infant into stressful situation."
For the rest of the article from Breastfeeding Magazine: http://bit.ly/IwBvW5

Postpartum
Would you turn your placenta into a picture frame? http://bit.ly/1im4rAY

'The pain of stillbirth stays with you forever' - Independent.ie http://bit.ly/1c7v5bx

What did you find interesting this week?
Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 
 
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


 

Egg Nutrients from A to Zinc

Posted on January 20, 2013 at 1:40 PM Comments comments (1)
Eggs are a nutritional powerhouse.  They get some bad press now and then (and I know our acupuncturist doesn’t care for them), however, as a tool for good nutrition in pregnancy, they can do a lot of good over the 40ish weeks a mom is building a new human being.   

The Brewer Diet teaches that a mother should eat two eggs a day as part of a high protein, whole food diet. *gasp* TWO EGGS A DAY!      

Yes – because pregnancy is a unique time in a woman’s life when the whole food she eats is being put to use immediately and for the unique purpose of growing a new person.  In his video, “Nutrition in Pregnancy”, Dr. Brewer says that we are not talking about eating two eggs a day for the rest of your life – his recommendation is simply for the length of pregnancy.   

This post is an expansion of a handout from a Bradley Method® that we provide to our students.  I want to present this information for a couple of reasons: 

  1. Convince you to try to at least try to eat eggs during pregnancy.  Two eggs a day sounds like a lot to some people, especially when you do not like the flavor, texture or smell.  By looking at some of the 20 nutritional components and the benefits they provide to you and baby, I hope you will be inspired to at least try working them into your diet.
  2. For the mamas with egg allergies.  Although you won’t be able to simply eat two eggs like some of us can, I have listed alternative foods after each nutritional component so that your body is getting the benefit from a different source.


Why eggs are so important for you and your growing baby: 

  • Eggs are a good source of the highest quality protein, which helps to support fetal growth. 
  • Eggs also have B vitamins that are important for normal development of nerve tissue and can help reduce the risk of serious birth defects that affect the baby's brain and spinal cord development. 
  • The type of iron in eggs (a healthy mixture of heme and non-heme iron) is particularly well-absorbed, making eggs a good choice for pregnant and breastfeeding women who are at higher risk for anemia. 
  • Eggs are an excellent source of choline, a little-known but essential nutrient that contributes to fetal brain development and helps prevent birth defects. The National Academy of Sciences recommends that pregnant women consume 450 milligrams of choline per day and that breastfeeding women consume 550 milligrams per day.  Eating two eggs a day gets you halfway there! 
  • Eggs are a source of antioxidants.  Antioxidants reduce harmful free radicals in various parts of the body. Free radicals (bad guys!) play a role in a variety of diseases: macular degeneration, cancer and heart disease 
  • The yolk includes healthy monosaturated and polyunsaturated fats and almost half of the high-quality protein found in eggs    


A to ZINC
In this section, you can find the nutritional components found in an egg, plus some alternative sources for that particular nutrient if you need some ideas.

Vitamin A is necessary for the growth and repair of body tissues.  It is important for eye health.  Anti-infection vitamin: it fights bacteria and infection.  In addition, it aids in teeth and bone formation.
Alternatives: liver, milk, carrots, green and yellow vegetables, broccoli, potatoes, pumpkin, yellow and orange fruits

B vitamins in general are important for making blood, for keeping your immune system strong and for helping your body use energy.
Thiamin (B1): aids in the conversion of carbohydrates into glucose, required for breakdown of fats and protein, maintain the muscle tone along the wall of the digestive tract and promote the health of the nervous system, skin, hair, eyes, mouth, and liver, improves the body to withstand stress 
Alternatives: Whole grain, fortified cereals, wheat germ, organ meats, eggs, rice, pasta, berries, nuts, beans, pork

Riboflavin (B2): bone, muscle & nerve development.  It is an essential vitamin that helps your body produce energy. B2 promotes growth, good vision, and healthy skin, and it's important for your baby's bone, muscle, and nerve development. Riboflavin is a water-soluble vitamin, which means your body doesn't store it – you'll need to get enough each day.  There's some evidence that women who don't get enough riboflavin may be at greater risk for preeclampsia.
Alternatives: dairy products, meats, poultry, fish, fortified cereals

Niacin (B3): brain development.  Niacin - too much in first tri-mester may lead to birth defects, cannot overdose by eating it - the danger is in supplements
Alternatives: meats, fish, milk, poultry, peanuts

Pantothenic Acid (B5): “...helps to form red blood cells, nuerotransmitters, fats, proteins, carbohydrates, antibodies, lipids and more,” benefits HERE  Alternatives: Eggs, liver, salmon, yeast

Pyridoxine (B6): helps carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism.  Aids antibody formation.  Helps maintain balance of sodium and phosphorus. 
Alternatives: chicken, liver, pork, whole grains, vegetables, nuts

Biotin (B7): metabolic function: processes nearly every type of food that you ingest, including carbohydrates, protein and fat
Alternatives: Liver, mushrooms, peanuts, egg yolk 

Cobalamin (B12): “plays a vital role in normal brain and nervous system functioning, as well as the formation of red blood cells.” More HERE 
Alternatives: Liver, milk, eggs, fish, cheese, meat

Vitamin D: contributes to bone strength by encouraging the absorption and metabolism of calcium and phosphorous
Alternatives: Milk, fatty fish, egg yolks, sunshine

Calcium:  important for the development of strong bones and teeth.  Assists normal blood clotting, muscle action, nerve function, and heart function.
Alternatives: Yogurt, milk, cheese, dark green leafy vegetables, canned fish with bones, fortified juices  

Cholesterol: it is a prime supplier of life-essential adrenal steroid hormones, such as cortisone, and sex hormones.  Aids in the metabolism of carbohyrates. 
Alternatives rich in omega-3 fatty acid: chia seeds, flax seeds, broccoli, spinach, kale, spring greens, cabbage, parsley, Brussels sprouts, walnuts   
Choline: for fetal brain development.  The National Academy of Sciences recommends increased choline intake for pregnant and breastfeeding women. Two eggs - including the yolks - contain about 250 milligrams of choline, or roughly half the recommended daily amount.
Alternatives: chicken, turkey, scallops, shrimp, grass-fed beef, sardines, collard greens, swiss chard, cauliflower

Folic Acid/Folate: is important in hemoglobin, formation of red blood cells and proper brain function.  Essential for the growth and reproduction of all body cells.  Helps produce and maintain all new body cells
Alternatives: liver, mushrooms, green leafy vegetables, spinach, broccoli, orange juice, whole wheat bread, beans

Iron: is an important mineral because it helps existing and new cells grow, helps blood carry oxygen through the body, helps strengthen muscles 
Alternatives: liver, seafood, lean meat, poultry, cereal, dried beans, egg yolks

Lutein and Zeaxanthin: these are antioxidants.  The macular pigment of the eye is rich in carotenoids, primarily lutein and zeaxanthin. In fact, macular pigment is mostly lutein and zeaxanthin, two substances that act as antioxidants. By increasing dietary intake of lutein and zeaxanthin, one may minimize the risk of developing Age Related Macular Degeneration. It seems that adding these specific nutrients to your meals may not only sidestep macular damage by free radicals, but they also strengthen macular tissue
Alternatives: kale, spinach, turnip greens, collard greens, romaine lettuce, broccoli, zucchini, corn, green peas, Brussels sprouts 

Magnesium: builds strong bones & teeth, regulates insulin & blood sugar, enzyme function.  Although eggs are not a significant source of magnesium, every little bit counts towards your healthy mom, healthy baby outcome!
Alternatives: spinach, pumpkin seeds, soybeans, brazil nuts, brown rice, artichokes, dates, wild salmon

Potassium: aids in the fluid and electrolyte balance of your body's cells.  Potassium is also important in sending nerve impulses, helping your muscles contract, and releasing energy from protein, fat, and carbohydrates.
Alternatives: white beans, dark leafy greens, baked potato with skin, dried apricots, baked acorn squash, yogurt, fish, avocados, white mushrooms, bananas

Sodium: regulate fluids, maintains the acid-base balance of blood, and helps nutrients cross cell membranes.  HERE is a link instead of a list for this one because I am going to make a suggestion instead.  The most common source of sodium is salt.  I encourage you to find foods that have aluminum-free salt.  Instead of eating salty junk foods that are not part of a whole food diet, find a good table salt that you can use in your cooking and salting your food to taste.  Did you know salt is a yes?   

Zinc: promotes cell reproduction, tissue growth and repair. 
Alternatives: red meats, poultry, fish, beans, nuts, whole grains, oysters, dairy   

MENU IDEAS
Maybe you are convinced…so now what else can you do with eggs besides scramble, fry or boil them? 
  • Omelet: you can add any of the alternative vegetables listed above and boost your intake of essential vitamins and minerals.  Skip, or skimp on the cheese, especially if you are going to add in leafy greens – dairy inhibits iron absorption. 
  • Hide: Eggs can be used to make French toast, or use them in your pancakes.  You can up your potassium by making a banana pancake recipe – yum! 
  • Bake: Our students with a sweet tooth add an extra egg or two to the recipes they are making.  While it makes the end result a little denser, it doesn’t change the flavor – bake away!! 
  • Quiches: they are surprisingly easy to make, and again, you can add in just about any ingredient to make a yummy meal that yields leftovers for another meal or two. 
  • Salad: Easy to crumble boiled eggs on top of any salad, or even make an egg salad to eat with lettuce wraps or as a sandwich filling.    

I hope you are inspired to add some eggs to your diet, starting today.  

What is your favorite way to add eggs into your daily fare?

LINK LIST 
More about the B2 (riboflavin) and pre-eclampsia connection http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10862839

More about Vitamin B5

More about Vitamin B12


More about magnesium 

Read more about cholesterol 


Top 10 lists of Vitamin and Mineral Sources http://www.healthaliciousness.com/most-nutritious-foods-lists.php     

Disclaimer:  
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.
  

Chocolate Can Be A Yes!

Posted on December 7, 2012 at 12:25 PM Comments comments (0)
Lisa from Wei of Chocolate - chocolate seems to decrease the risk for pre-eclampsiaWhat - chocolate doesn't have to be a guilty secret during your pregnancy!

Probably not IF you find a high quality,additive free dark chocolate!  (P.S. I have a source for you to try...pictured to the left is Lisa Reinhardt from Wei of Chocolate - heaven in your mouth)



The "traditional" concerns with chocolate during pregnancy:

  • They can be empty calories - lots of empty calories not good long term for a healthy weight gain.
  • Chocolate is a hidden source of caffeine - not good in high quantity during pregnancy (more than 200 mg/day*).
  • Conventional chocolate processing takes out the good cacao butter (candymakers can sell it for profit) and replaces it with soy lecithin (concerns about GMO, estrogen content).


Well, here is the scoop!  I am on my way out the door - here are some links for you to peruse and to ponder.

The biggest deal for me from this reading list?  Chocolate intake seems to be tied to a decrease in a pregnant mother's risk for pre-eclampsia.  WOW!!!

Chocolate has been shown to be a positive factor in pregnancy
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20609337

Chocolate has health benefits during pregnancy
http://suite101.com/article/chocolate-in-pregnancy-a105931

Here is our source for fair-trade, vegan chocolate that keeps all the good stuff in, plus the added benefits of flower essences:
http://www.weiofchocolate.com/

As per the caffeine info below, one piece of dark chocolate per day is well below the 200/mg per day max!!

What do you think about adding chocolate to your pregnancy diet?

*Caffeine During Pregnancy
More about caffeine levels during pregnancy from
http://www.healthlibrary.com/healthwise.php
(You can find this info if you search for "Caffeine During Pregnancy" in their database.)

"Caffeine is the most frequently used drug during pregnancy. In small amounts, caffeine is considered safe for the fetus. It's a good idea to keep your caffeine intake below 200 mg a day because:
  • More caffeine may be connected to a higher rate of miscarriage. There is not enough evidence to know for sure.
  • Caffeine is a diuretic, meaning it makes you urinate more often. This can cause you to lose important minerals, including calcium.
  • Caffeine can interfere with sleep for both you and your fetus.

Avoid caffeine, or limit your intake to about 1 cup of coffee or tea each day.

Caffeine can be found in many types of drinks and in chocolate. The amount of caffeine in your coffee or tea can depend on the serving size, the brand, or how it was brewed.

Coffee drinks such as a 16-oz mocha can have 175 mg of caffeine, and a 12-oz regular coffee can have as much as 260 mg of caffeine. Tea can have 30 mg to 130 mg of caffeine in a 12-oz cup. An ounce of milk chocolate can have 1 mg to 15 mg of caffeine, and dark chocolate can have 5 mg to 35 mg of caffeine. Many soft drinks and energy drinks also have caffeine.

It is important to keep track of your caffeine intake throughout the day. Check the label if you do not know how much caffeine is in your drink or chocolate bar. Talk to your doctor about caffeine and nutrition during pregnancy."

Disclaimer:  
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

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