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Sweet Pea Births

Chandler, Arizona

Sweet Pea Births

...celebrating every swee​t pea their birth

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Mommy Con: January from Birth Without Fear

Posted on October 10, 2013 at 6:33 AM Comments comments (0)
Cassandra and I were part of the "media" contingent at MommyCon LA Babywearing World Record Event on Sunday, October 6, 2013.  We had such a wonderful time walking the floor, meeting vendors and being inspired by the wonderful speakers as we looked and listened to bring all the happenings back to you.  See the bottom of this posts for links to more of the activity! 

At 2:00 pm, the third person to take the stage on Sunday was January Harshe, founder of Birth Without Fear, sponsored by Nüroo.  She started a facebook page with a simple message - that birth does not have to be scary, and that we have choices.  That message has resonated and grown into an incredible community that is active on-line 24/7.

Here are the notes I took as she delivered her message on Sunday:

You are judged for your choices no matter what you make.  Life is hard – we are all doing our best.  The last thing we need to do is judge others – be kind to one another.

Choices – you do have a choice when it comes to birth.

With her fourth child, she decided to have complete faith in her body.  We are indoctrinated with unrealistic images of birth in the media – either it’s completely zen calm and peaceful (my note: and in the middle of nowhere somewhere beautiful), or it’s a major emergency when mother and baby need to have a life-saving operation.

There is a choice not to cut – you can choose to birth via cesarean or vaginally – you can choose to breastfeed or pump or to give formula.

The days when the OB told a mom what to do and how it’s going to go – that is changing.  She's striving to make them numbered.

January wants to tell as many women as possible that they have a choice:
My body
It’s up to me how I birth

What is another mom going through?  How does she need to heal?  “This is my vagina – if I want to have a baby out of it – it’s my choice.”

If you can’t find someone to support your choice – do more than sit online and complain.  Start acting as a consumer – demand change.

I heard a paradigm shift in her presentation:
You hire your care provider to do a service.  Find someone to do the job you want them to do.  If they don’t listen, respect your choice, then you know it’s time to hire someone else.

The last thing you want is to go home with a new baby and the trauma from a bad birth experience.  Your care provider doesn’t have to live with your birth – you do.

If there were no moms birthing in the hospitals any more, they would be quick to change their policies!

We need to take the power back for ourselves – our daughters – our granddaughters.

The feeling of “I rocked this birth – I can do anything” should not be rare and exclusive.

We need to go into birth feeling supported and empowered.

How we birth affects our postpartum experience.

If you have postpartum depression, and you always feel like you are going to cry – Cry.  It’s okay – you are still a good mom. (melt – I love this woman’s message!!)

After a VBAC with her third child, within 15 minutes her care provider started tearing apart her birth and her choices and deflated her "VBAC high".  The care provider was callous and careless, and her postpartum experience left her questioning herself.

With her fourth child, she decided to get “in the zone”.  She and her husband made their choice about how they were going to birth.  If anyone came into “the zone” with negative energy, she punched them out (jabs at the air with a couple of side punches to the great delight of the audience) and went back into her “zone”.

She birthed her baby without any drama, complications, and she had her family around her after the baby was born.  They welcomed their new child together.  Her postpartum experience was very different – down to the breastfeeding relationship.

In talking with midwives at The Farm, they do not have any incidence of postpartum depression.  One of the midwives stated that she thinks PPD is a symptom of nuclear family living in isolation.  In communal living, women support and help each other; when they see a need, they take care of it.  In nuclear family living, women are isolated and alone.  It is seen as weakness to need help.

January believes that we need other women.  We need to cry and celebrate together, be okay with doing each other’s dishes, bringing meals, letting mamas take a shower.  We need to support each other with no judgement and help each other with love.

Empower birth.
Support the postpartum period.

My note…even more kudos to this woman for being there for the mamas at Mommy Con.  She has her own conference coming up this weekend – not even a mention or a peep about it when she had the perfect platform for self-promotion.  Truly she is a woman who is changing the world, one interaction at a time.

Want more Mommy Con scoop??
HEREare my notes from Dr. Robert Sears - He talked about vaccinations during pregnancy, postpartum, and for infants.
 
HERE are the notes from Jessica Martin-Weber of The Leaky [email protected]@b - Her talk was about parenting and being confident in our choices.
 
HERE are the notes from Abby Theuring of The Badass Breastfeeder - Her talk was about empowering breastfeeding as a society

HERE is a link to our tour of the convention floor.

HERE is a link to the Babywearing Fashion Show.

HERE is a link to pictures of the Babywearing World Record.

Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 
 
 Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


Meet the Doula: Jennifer

Posted on October 3, 2013 at 9:41 AM Comments comments (21)
This month's featured doula is Jennifer Valencia.  She is a doula that serves Central and Northern Arizona.  She believes that birth is a sacred time and every mother should be nurtured and respected as she brings her baby earth side.

When was the first time you heard the word, “doula”?
The first time I heard the word doula was probably in 2006, some time before my first baby’s birth. I didn’t really understand the full scope of benefits of a doula until the birth of my second child when I experienced a DONA certified doula.

How did you decide that becoming a doula was part of your journey?
I had a friend who was having her baby a few months before my first son was born and she was made to labor alone because “only the father” was allowed into the hospital after hours, per their policy. I knew this kind of treatment was not right and I advocated to make a difference before my son’s birth. Besides the role of advocacy, I knew I wanted to make a positive difference in the lives of mothers, babies and families at this very significant time in their lives.

Are you a birth and/or a postpartum doula?
I am a birth doula.

How long have you been a doula?
I have supported friends and family in their birth experiences prior to becoming a doula but began to take a much more active role in my training in 2012 and providing support to my community with local birth circles. I have completed my requirements to become a CD(DONA) and my certification is pending. I am also educated in the Social and Human Services field and am in the process of obtaining my MSW. I have taken advanced doula training- certified in TENS support for labor. I love to bring essential oils into the birthing room.

What do you enjoy the most about being a doula?
I enjoy providing women with evidence based knowledge surrounding prenatal care, pregnancy, birth and their newborn so that families can be empowered in their birth experiences. I am honored to hold a sacred space for women and their partners, allowing them to have a more intimate birth experience with confidence. I love seeing her joy as she meets and bonds with her newborn for the first time.

What is your philosophy when you go to a birth space?
I believe that birth is a sacred time and every mother should be nurtured and respected as she brings her baby earth side. As a doula, I hold that sacred space and strive to build confidence in childbirth and the ability of a woman’s amazing body. I believe that birth is a normal life event. I believe that birth matters; it is a transformational time, shaping the kind of mother and person a woman is.

How do you work with and involve the Coach?
I strive to create an intimate space, not just for the mother, but for the family. I provide perspective and support for a woman’s partner to participate at their comfort level to enhance the support they provide. Prenatally, we talk about “what to expect” and I focus on building confidence and trust in birth as a natural process that is different for every woman and every birth. A partner or other loved one brings compassion and intimate knowledge of you, while a doula brings knowledge, confidence and experience to the birthing room. Together, a doula and your coach make a strong support system. When the partner is desired as the primary support person, I work behind the scenes; I quietly offer ideas for the coach to support the mother and keep both of their basic needs met. I consider myself having “successfully” supported an intimate birth when mom remembers me as a nice person in the room and dad felt confident in his ability to support her. When the coach prefers to be in the moment and enjoy the birth experience but not be the main pillar of support, I am sure to include the coach’s presence so that the mother is very connected with him but I support her physical and emotional labor needs.

What is the toughest situation you have ever dealt with?  How did you handle it?
I have been in a birth where hospital staff does not listen to the mother’s desires for her baby or take the time to listen to her views of a situation. There wasn’t much I could do against the “policy” but I could still support the mother- I took the time to listen and validate her feelings and advocate for her within my scope of practice as a doula. I helped her feel more empowered and overcome a situation where she felt disregarded.

What keeps you working as a doula?
I keep working as a doula because I long for every mother to have a safe and satisfying birth experience. I have seen the difference a doula makes and am eager to bring awareness about evidence based birth into my community by providing opportunities for mothers to connect and support one another in the birth circles. Not to mention I love these adorable babies and empowered mamas!

What does your fee cover – how many visits or hours?  Is there a different charge for a shorter labor or longer labor?
My basic birth doula service includes a minimum of two prenatal appointments, on-call availability 24/7, access to my lending library and at least one postpartum appointment. Prenatal appointments generally last about 1.5hrs, include basic childbirth education and are for getting to know each other and how I can help you achieve the birth you desire. I will provide continuous emotional and physical support for the mother and her partner throughout labor, birth and up to four hours after. Postpartum appointments vary in length and are for talking about your birth experience; I also provide basic breastfeeding counseling and referrals as needed. My basic birth doula services are $500, however, I believe in a doula for every woman who wants one; if money is a concern when hiring a doula, my basic services are offered for a donation. I have packages that include more extensive childbirth education, belly casts, birth stories, massages, yoga and more, starting at $550.  My fee does not vary based on the length of labor.

Do you offer any other services to your clients?
I offer belly casting and placenta encapsulation, tinctures and more.

Just for fun, what do you do when you are not doula-ing?
I enjoy rock climbing, hiking and spending time with my husband and children.

About our doula:  I am Jennifer Valencia.  I have two beautiful children and a wonderful, supportive husband. I have been drawn to the field of birth work since 2006 and am now obtaining my certification through DONA International. Because I have had a VBAC, mothers seeking a vaginal birth after cesarean have a special place in my heart. I feel honored to walk along side families in Arizona during this very beautiful time. As a birth doula, I support women of Yavapai County, Flagstaff and Phoenix. I attend birth in any setting- hospital, home or birth center.  Find me online at www.guidingangelsbirthservices.com, via email at
[email protected], or call me at 928.300.1337.


Disclaimer: 
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonThe material included on this site is for informational purposes only.  It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

Rally to Improve Birth 2013

Posted on July 16, 2013 at 6:59 PM Comments comments (0)
Did you know that there is a national organization advocating evidence-based care and humanity in childbirth? 

I first became aware of ImprovingBirth.org when they held their first rally last year.  In order to bring awareness to the maternity health care crisis in our country, the organizers chose the date of Labor Day for the national event.  This year, they are truly nation-wide – there is at least one rally planned in all 50 states, and as of today, it looks like they are up to eight international locations.

What maternity health care crisis in the United States, you ask?  Here is a look at the numbers.  In the world:
  • We are 34th in maternal mortality rates:  33 countries have lower maternal mortality than we do.
  • We are 38th in neonatal mortality rates: 37 countries have lower neonatal mortality rates than we do.
  • We are 41st in infant mortality rates: 40 countries do a better job at keeping newborns alive than we do.
  • We are 66th in birth weight: 65 countries do better than us when it comes to birthing babies at healthy birth weights.
  • We are 33rd in the breastfeeding: 32 countries had higher rates of exclusively breastfeeding at six months.

So do you know why I find this so infuriating?
“ Despite the poor international ranking, the International Federation of Health Plans recently reported that average U.S. payments for vaginal birth were far higher than all other countries reported, including Canada, France, and Australia (7).”


















Are you motivated to stand with women, children and coaches to rally for change? 
On September 2, 2013, from 10 a.m. – 12 noon local time, cities across the states are going to host a Rally to Improve Birth.  The rally is not to promote one kind of birth over other kinds of births.  It is not about bashing care providers and birthing facilities.

“It’s about women being capable of making safer, more informed decisions about their care and that of their babies, when they are given full and accurate information about their care options, including the potential harms, benefits, and alternatives.  It’s about respect for women and their decisions in childbirth, including how, where, and with whom they give birth; and the right to be treated with dignity and compassion.”
-Rally To Improve Birth

What is the message that Improving Birth is striving for?  Here are some of the messages they hope to get across that day (hint...ideas for rally signs):
  • Lower the C-Section Rate
  • Respectful Maternity Care 
  • Question Your Induction
  • Informed Consent is My Right 
  • Evidence-Based Birth

You can click HERE to find your local rally (readers in the Phoenix, AZ area - local info at the bottom of this post):
http://rallytoimprovebirth.com/find-a-rally-near-you/

If you can’t stand side-by-side with the families attending the rally, you can still participate.  All the rallies are 100% volunteer organized – even a donation of $10.00 can help buy water to hydrate all the mamas, babies, coaches and care providers standing under the hot sun on Labor Day to bring awareness and change to the maternal healthcare system.
Donate HERE to the national organization:

Donate HERE to the local Phoenix Rally:
http://rallytoimprovebirth.causevox.com/phoenix

HERE is a story from an "eye-roller" at last year’s rally, to a supporter at this year’s rally.  I would like to think that these stories are few and far between.  Unfortunately, I know they are not.  Due to my involvement in the birth community at large, I have personally heard stories from several women who felt completely violated by their care providers and the current standard of care.  We can make a difference.  We can stand together and insist that it is time to humanize birth again, to use evidence-based care, and to involve the birthing family as partners in their birth story. For more information, please visit their main website:

Readers in the Phoenix, AZ area
Here is the info on our local event:
September 2, 2013
10:00 am to 12:00 pm
Tempe Beach Park
54 West Rio Salado Parkway
Tempe, Arizona 85281

To stay up-to-date on the local event, visit the Facebook Page.



Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


Rights For Homebirth - May 2013 Update

Posted on May 17, 2013 at 8:56 AM Comments comments (0)

The final Midwifery Scope of Practice Meeting was held on Wednesday, May 15, 2013.  It is now time for the families of Arizona, and anyone else who believes that compassionate care is a human right’s issue for the mother and the baby to take a stand.

You can click on the links below to read a copy of the current draft rules and to see Wednesday’s proceedings:
Most Recent Draft: http://1.usa.gov/YZw4Xt
Most Recent Meeting: http://bit.ly/104ZtKT

Here is my statement on the Arizona Department of Health Services Website:
In addition to agreeing wholeheartedly with Allyson Fernstrom's statement below, I want to direct the committee to THIS brief article with references if they want to dig deeper:
 
As the article and study succinctly show, "FTP" and "CPD" in the 21st century are mostly iatrogenic.  "Watchful waiting" IS the midwifery model of care in the hospital, in the birth center and in the home setting.  Many midwives have less than a 15% cesarean rate (defined as an "acceptable" rate by the WHO) in their practices because they do not intervene until necessary.  This does not mean emergency; read: most of these are non-emergent and appropriate.
 
At this point in our history, 99% of births are still occurring in the hospital setting (read more HERE), and a vast majority of those women are still under the OB model of care: the "do something to help this along" model.  A 32.8% cesarean rate calls into question the common practices that are being forced on women.  It should not surprise us that some of these women are demanding a different model of care with subsequent pregnancies.
 
It is unreasonable to essentially punish women who are seeking compassionate care after feeling abused in the traditional care system by doctors who subscribe to a different philosophy about birth.  By including FTP and CPD in the final version of the rules and regulations, you are essentially providing a VBAC option on paper without providing a VBAC option that will be a choice for the majority of the consumers who are now faced with choosing unassisted births instead of facing the trauma they faced in a previous birth.
 
Before a final draft is approved, I implore Dir. Humble to attend a home birth.  See what it is we are talking about.  Really understand why we are so passionate about this cause, and why we believe that birth is a fundamental human right and a woman's rights issue.  We are not asking for the sun, the moon and the stars.  We simply want you to understand the power of birth, and why we want our care providers to have all the tools they need at their disposal if we choose a home birth setting. 
 
Midwives have the ability, the training, and the knowledge to bring babies safely into the world without compromising the health of the mother.  They believe that mothers care about the life they carry within them, and will do their research when it comes time to choose or decline procedures.  Midwives also know how to recognize non-reassuring patterns and when it is time to safely transfer to a different birth setting in the rare cases that complications do arise.
 
I advocate for midwives to be free to choose the clients that they feel they have the training to care for, be that VBAC, breech, or mothers of multiples.  As an informed consumer, I ask for the state to certify that the women who offer this care are educated in the care and management of those labors.  Along with this, I trust that midwives will have the opportunity to continue their education so that they can assist at VBAC, breech and multiples births once they have completed training in those areas.  I am glad to see that there is a review process to keep midwives accountable for their decisions, none of which will be made lightly because at midwives care deeply about the women and the children that they serve. 
 
Dir. Humble, you have the opportunity to lead here and set a new standard for the great state of Arizona.  Please take it.
 
Respectfully,
Krystyna Robles-Bowman
Mother of 4
Chandler, AZ
 
Statement from Allyson Fernstrom:
"I am extremely grateful to see that VBAC is still included in the drafts. I believe this is a huge step in the right direction. It shows that the department is listening to the concerns of the consumers. I appreciate that more options are being opened up to the growing number of women who desire to achieve a VBAC. However, I have GREAT concern with some of the conditions suggested. It currently reads that a midwife can not attend a VBAC if their was a diagnosis of "failure to dilate" or cephalopelvic insufficiency". I heard in the last meeting that it is supposed to read "failure to progress". That does not make the problem better. Failure to progress, failure to dilate and cephalopelvic insufficiency/disproportion are ALL unacceptable. There is NO literature to support this rule. Listen to the members of the committee, including those from the medical community, who have mentioned may times that FTP is over diagnosed. FTP only tells you that a mother did not progress. It did not tell you WHY she did not progress. What if there was failed induction? What if it is an emotional issue that stalled labor? What if the baby was in a poor positioning? Maybe the care provider followed the Friedman's Curve, which does NOT allow the typical mother enough time to labor to full dilation? There are too many variables in play. A woman should not be excluded from attempting a VBAC because she had a failed induction, an emotional block, a baby in a poor position, an impatient care provider, etc. Because the diagnosis of FTP does NOT explain WHY the woman had a cesarean section, it should NOT be used to determine whether or not she is capable of vaginal delivery. CPD is also highly disputed in the literature. It is difficult to ever give a TRUE diagnosis of CPD. The testing is unreliable. FTP and CPD are subjective, over diagnosed and would be completely inappropriate in the rules. Director Humble mentioned that if he allows VBAC, he does not want to make it so restrictive that no one can do it. Leaving in FTP and CPD would essentially make it impossible for most VBAC clients to qualify for a homebirth VBAC. Consumers and members of the committee have been asking from the beginning that this be removed from the rules. Listen to these important stakeholders!"

Do you want to get involved?  Please do!!

There is a peaceful Rights For Birth rally being planned for today and Monday in the Phoenix area – click HERE for all the details.

Do you want to submit your own comment?
Click HERE for to make a direct public comment.

Let me be clear that I do not believe that OB's are bad people.  I simply disagree with the birth paradigm under which many of them practice.  I am forever grateful for their skill set as surgeons when it is an appropriate and needed use of their considerable skill in the operating theater.

Do you believe birth is a human right and/or a woman's rights issue?  Why or why not?
Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 
*I think* that the amount of traffic you so generously generate has led to a lot of spam posting.  In an effort to keep the spam to a minimum, I am taking the time to moderate comments now.
 
Disclaimer:
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.
Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided. This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


 

Blueprint for a Vaginal Birth

Posted on April 26, 2013 at 7:35 PM Comments comments (0)
While there are no guarantees that the kind or amount of preparation you do will lead to a vaginal birth, there are things you can do to increase your opportunity to have the vaginal birth you want for your baby.

If I could write a blueprint for having a vaginal birth, I would follow the Five-Point Plan outlined in our Bradley Method® classes.  Here are five things you can do throughout your pregnancy to decrease your chance of a cesarean when you go into labor:

1.  Exercise
Have you ever heard of a person signing up for a race on the day of the event with no prior running experience?  Have you ever heard of an athlete being signed to a team without any previous training in that sport?  No.  You would not participate in an athletic event without at least three months of prior training.  Labor is like an athletic event.  You will have the best outcome possible if you are free to move, walk, and engage your body in different physical positions.  A body that is ready for that event will perform much better than a body that starts labor with no preparation at all. 
The Bradley Method® asks students to consider THESE exercises to tone the back, belly and bottom, the most active muscle groups in labor.  We also ask all our students to find some kind of stamina-building exercise that they can do on a regular basis.  Each mama is encouraged to at the very least walk 20 minutes per day.  There are also other exercises that are safe for a pregnant mother that do not cause excessive strain on the mama by bouncing up and down on the Kegel muscle: swimming, jogging in a lap pool, water aerobics, and prenatal yoga are all forms of exercise that former students have found beneficial to build their stamina for labor.

2.  Good Nutrition
Coach Bruss tries to impress on the coaches that they have a vested interest in ensuring that their partners are eating a healthy, whole food diet.  The benefits for the long-term health of the growing baby will last their lifetime.  The mother will benefit in pregnancy and labor if she is well hydrated and well nourished.  You can read more about the details of what we teach in Bradley™ classes HERE.
In the event that the MotherBaby do have a cesarean birth, the well-nourished pair has a better chance at recovery and establishing breastfeeding.  Barring additional complications from surgery, Mother can withstand the trauma of labor and her milk should come in without too much delay if she has been well nourished.  Her good nutrition made strong, healthy, stretchy tissues, so she may also have a better recovery healing from the physical rigors of a cesarean.  Baby has been afforded every opportunity to have all the right nutrients for growth while in-utero, and they are likely to be born at their best health possible. 

Anecdotally, I can share that most of the babies born via cesarean to our students have had lusty appetites when they are reunited with their mothers!

3.  Education
You and your partner are going to live with your baby for the rest of your lives.  The decisions you make and the information you learn during your pregnancy will help you make the best decisions possible when it comes time to make choices for your birth.

When time allows, take a comprehensive childbirth education course. 
We love the Bradley Method®, which is why we took it twice and then became certified instructors.  We both wanted to work together to bring our children into the world so it made sense for Bruss to train as my coach.  We felt the topics covered in the twelve weeks would help us to be as knowledgeable as possible about the process of labor and how to handle the work of labor.  We liked the focus on communication, exercise, nutrition and relaxation every week.

If “one size fit all”, there would not need to be any other types of childbirth preparation course.  The reality is that what works for me, may not work for you, and what works for you, may not work for your best friend, etc.  There are several other methods to prepare women and/or couples for birth.  Along with a link to The Bradley Method® main page so you can find an instructor in your area, I have listed some of my colleagues in the Phoenix area who teach other methods at the end of the post,.

I also recognize that sometimes classes are not possible due to timing or resources.  Read THIS about the natural alignment plateau.  I also put a suggested reading list at the bottom of this post – you can read as much or as little as you want.  I did list my top three choices if your time is limited and you really want to do your best to be ready for your birth.

I will close this section with a parting thought: you would not save up your money for the vacation of a lifetime and then hand over that savings to a travel agent and say, “Book it” without any further investment in the process.  Your child is priceless.  Take the time to read, form a community and really be confident in the choices you want to make for your birth, and the options you are willing to consider if your birth takes a different course than you prepared for.

4.  Take Responsibility
Piggyback on the last idea: you are the ultimate arbiter of your pregnancy and labor.  You can inform yourself and make the best decisions, or you can be completely casual and careless, or something in between.
There are resources like the Environmental Working Group that provide lists of safe products and foods for families.  We spend a whole class talking about harmful substances, environmental hazards, and alternatives to them in our Bradley™ series class on Pregnancy.

You can also take responsibility for your pregnancy by taking care of yourself physically and emotionally.  Avoid stress and overwork.  Instead of popping a pill, what do you think about going to see a chiropractor, getting a massage, or going to prenatal yoga classes to ease the discomforts of pregnancy?

Some of the most important choices for you to make intentionally revolve around your birth plan.  Do you have a provider that supports your birth choices?  What is their primary cesarean rate?  Are you at a birthing facility that supports your choices?  What is the facility’s primary cesarean rate?  This information is public record – you can find it.  If not, you can contact an advocacy group like Childbirth Connection or Improving Birth to help you uncover that information and find the most vaginal-birth friendly providers and birthing places in your region.

Especially if you choose a hospital birth, you can also explore your feelings about hiring a doula.  Learn what a doula’s role is in birth, how to hire one that best suits what you anticipate your needs as a couple will be, and then plan it into your budget.  Some doulas work on sliding scales, and they are willing to trade and barter – all birth workers want to help you in any way they can.  Realistically, couples in all birth places can benefit from a doula – read up and see which choice is right for you.

5.  Relaxation
Relaxation is the key to The Bradley Method®.  Dr. Bradley believed that a well-trained mother who was accompanied by her loving coach could do anything that nature intended.  With the knowledge of the progress of labor, she doesn’t have to be afraid of “what comes next”.  A well-trained mother welcomes the sensations of labor with the knowledge that this is a journey she must take to grow as a mother. 

Bradley™ classes teach strategies for physical, mental and emotional relaxation to have as many tools as possible to break the Pain-Fear-Tension cycle.  We teach our couples various positions for labor so that a mother can follow her instincts and get into the best position possible to achieve maximum relaxation. Both she and Coach know the roadmap.  They also know that their course may be a sprint or a marathon, or maybe something in between – their role is to accept the labor and follow mama’s instincts about what she needs and when.  Once she is completely relaxed and able to surrender, labor can progress beautifully and unencumbered to an unmedicated, vaginal birth.  

In closing:
As I mentioned earlier in the post, sometimes you do all the right things and yet, you are still being presented with a situation that looks like it may lead to a cesarean.  HERE is a good post that covers how to handle different labor scenarios that may present as a reason for a cesarean. If mom is okay and baby is okay, you can think about asking for more time.

What if you do everything right and you still end up at the operating room?  
Read HERE to learn about your options if you want to maximize your cesarean experience to capture the essence of a vaginal birth.  Again, you must educate yourself and prepare.  Consider writing a cesarean Birth Plan B so that your provider is well aware of what you want to happen before you are in labor and so that when you ask for these things, they are not forgotten.  A natural approach to a cesarean takes more time than a standard cesarean.  By discussing these things in pregnancy, you are not going to ask them to change their “game” without fair warning.  

All of our students come to class with the intention of having a natural, vaginal birth.  There are times when they have made the choice to have a cesarean for a Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby outcome after laboring and using the tools they learned in class. They had the skill set to help them identify that despite doing all the things they could, the cesarean was the birth that their baby needed.  The overwhelming majority of them have been grateful for all the preparation and the communication skills they learned.  Unlike families who felt railroaded into their cesareans, couples who prepare for their births choose to have cesareans that ensure a Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby outcome and they have a degree of peace with their birth to help them on the road to healing.

I know gratitude for the process doesn’t take away the feelings of not having the birth they planned and prepared for.  Barring the rare complications, having an empowered pregnancy does give them the best possible chance of a VBAC next time.

If you did everything right and still had a cesarean, I encourage you to accept your birth.  Your baby had a reason for needing a cesarean, and assuming you hired a capable, experienced care provider that you trusted, they knew that knew that was the birth you needed.  Seek support from other women who had cesareans through the ICAN organization in person or on-line.

Lastly, there is a group of women who will always need a cesarean.  They may be high-risk, or they may have high-risk pregnancies.  To those women, I say, “You are strong.  You are lionesses.”  Cesarean births are no joke, and to be willing to undergo them again and again for the love of family, you are the ultimate examples of a mother’s love.  Thank you.

What do you think – would you add or subtract anything from this list?
Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted.  *I think* that the amount of traffic you so generously generate has led to a lot of spam posting.  In an effort to keep the spam to a minimum, I am taking the time to moderate comments now.

Reading list:
Top Three-Four, especially if you are not going to take a class
Natural Childbirth The Bradley™ Way – Susan McCutcheon, AAHCC
Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth – Ina May Gaskin
Thinking Woman’s Guide to a Better Birth – Henci Goer
The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding – La Leche League, International

Other very informative books:
Husband-Coached Childbirth – Dr. Robert Bradley
Exercises for True Natural Childbirth – Rhondda Hartman, RN, AAHCC
The Birth Book – Dr. William Sears and Martha Sears, RN
Active Birth - Janet Balaskas
A Child is Born – Lennart Nilsson
What Every Pregnant Woman Should Know – Gail Sforza with Dr. Tom Brewer
Metabolic Toxemia of Late Pregnancy – Dr. Tom Brewer
Children at Birth – Marjie and Jay Hathway, AAHCC
The Baby Book – Dr. William Sears and Martha Sears, RN 

Main Page for The Bradley Method®

Other Childbirth Preparation Classes:
Hypnobirthing: Marinah Farrell (4-6 week course)  480-528-1689Hypnobabies: Noelia Waldo (6 week course)  (480) 295-0895
Birthing From Within: Alejandrina Vostrejos  (6 weeks) 480-206-1985
 
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson Disclaimer:   
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

   

Planning a VBAC – Dad’s Count, Too

Posted on April 24, 2013 at 11:50 AM Comments comments (0)
When it comes to pregnancy, labor and birth, the vast majority of the writing and expectation for preparation is geared at the mother.  One of the reason’s we chose The Bradley Method® is because it recognizes that the father may also want to play a role in the birth of the child and Bradley™ prepares the couple for labor to welcome their child, not just the mother.

The same holds true when planning a Vaginal Birth After Cesarean (VBAC).  If the partner was present for the first birth, they also experienced varying degrees of stress: watching their loved one undergo major surgery, the physical recovery period, and the emotional recovery period, which might have been longer than the physical recovery.  They may have watched their partner struggle with breastfeeding, if that was the choice for their family.  In any case, it may be a good idea for a mother to consider her partner’s feelings if she wants complete support in her choice for a VBAC.

Jenni Froment, ICAN Phoenix co-leader, shared some insights at last month’s ICAN “For Dads” meeting.  I have added to them from our experience with VBAC couples and from the knowledge I have learned from attending ICAN meetings. 

These points are meant to initiate a conversation with your partner if you have not already covered them.  You may have talked through some of these after your cesarean birth, and they may bear revisiting as you move forward with future pregnancies.

What is going on in your partner’s head?
Partners have concerns, feelings about your birth(s), and they can get anxious, too.  
  • What is their first reaction when you tell them that you want to prepare for a VBAC?  
  • What is their biggest concern?

How do you involve your partner in the decision of whether or not to VBAC?
  • Have them express their feelings about the previous cesarean, and then talk about how they feel about a VBAC now that they have had time to hear why you want to prepare for one.
  • What are your partner’s priorities?
  • How do they envision their role in the planning process? 

Wouldn’t just be easier to have a repeat cesarean?
It is not generally a life-threatening since it is a surgery with a specific procedure and protocol after years of execution.  It is, however, a major abdominal surgery.  As Dr. Victor Berman explained to us at our Bradley Method® training, if your body underwent this kind of trauma outside of the operating room, very few people would survive.  Beyond the physical trauma to the human body, there is a risk for infections, an emergency hysterectomy, an admission to the ICU.  There is the introduction of narcotic drugs to the mother and baby, and the incredible physical ordeal of recovery.  There is nothing “easy” about a cesarean. 

Isn’t the VBAC going to be a lot of work?
 Yes, it might be.  Most mothers experience a sense of loss when they have a cesarean.  Planning can take the power back.  The analogy was shared that you spend months planning for the single event of your wedding day.  The day of your child’s birth merits at least that kind of attention, if not more.  Planning can alleviate stress in the labor and delivery space if the couple already knows their options and how they want to use them for their labor.  In a healthy, low-risk mother, a vaginal birth is best for both mom and baby.  Even if you should have a repeat cesarean, the prepared approach can empower a couple who can know in their heart of hearts that they did everything possible to prepare for a different outcome and their best choice for a Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby outcome was a repeat cesarean.

What is the benefit of letting the baby choose their birthday instead of just scheduling their birthday so we can plan?
 A healthy baby is the best-informed individual when it come to choosing the day of their birth.  A baby that is ready for life outside of the womb will have lungs that are fully developed and ready to breathe without the help of a machine.  The breastfeeding relationship has a better chance if the baby is healthy and can have skin-to-skin contact immediately after their birth (yes, even if it is another CESAREAN).

What are the risks of a VBAC?  Is it a safe choice?
 Uterine rupture is “the” drop word when it comes to VBAC.  You can refer to last Friday’s post to see what the numbers really look like (find it HERE).  The bottom line is that there are several other complications that can happen, whether or not you have had a previous cesarean.  Pregnancy is generally a healthy time in a woman’s life, and with a comprehensive childbirth preparation course, a family can prepare for a VBAC by keeping the pregnancy as healthy and low-risk as possible.  Bradley Method® students also get 12 weeks of nutrition education to help them build a strong, healthy mama and baby.

 The other thing to note in regards to uterine rupture is that there are two known factors that increase the stats:  the induction and the augmentation of labor.  If you want to lower your risk of uterine rupture, find a care provider who is willing to do “watchful waiting” as long as there is a Healthy Mom and a Healthy Baby.

 Lastly, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology just posted a position in support of vaginal deliveries.  You can read the position statement here:
Vaginal Delivery Recommended over Maternal-Request Cesarean

...and this one in case you are bring pressured to induce for suspected large-baby (macrosomia) or anything else that is not a medically necessary:
Early Deliveries Without Medical Indications

Communication Exercises
In the interest of moving forward together, you will need to communicate your needs to each other.  Let your partner know if any of these are important to you:
  • Tell them how you want to be supported
  • Have them listen to your feelings about your previous cesarean, and why exploring VBAC together is important to you
  • Go to appointments with you so that together you can asses whether or not providers are right for you
  • Can he be an advocate for you if people are questioning your decisions?
  • If your priorities are his/her priorities, could they verbalize and affirm your choices to encourage you?

So you and your partner have talked.  Are you both open to the idea of exploring a VBAC?  HERE is a guideline to planning a VBAC from ICAN Phoenix leader Jesse Franks, and HERE is the advice from midwives in our area.  

Here’s the checklist from Jenni's meeting:
  1. Find a supportive care provider.  If possible find out their primary cesarean rate and their VBAC stats.  Those should be a good indication of whether or not they subscribe to “watchful waiting”.
  2. Hire a doula.  Doulas are proven to reduce the amount of interventions a mother receives, the fewer the interventions, the more likely it will be for labor to progress towards a healthy, low-risk vaginal birth.
  3. Take a comprehensive childbirth class.  A good class will prepare you by teaching what to expect from pregnancy, labor and birth.  It will also fill your toolbox with coping mechanisms for the work of labor.  
  4. Research the protocols at your birth place and know your patient rights.
  5. Have faith in your intuition – let your instincts guide you.
  6. Plan your birth team well in advance of your estimated due date.  Everyone is on board with your vision and supports your choices, from you and your partner to your care provider, doula, and family.  Knowing who is not on board also helps you avoid “toxic” people who want to change your mind.

Do you have any ideas to share and add to the conversation?
Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted.  *I think* that the amount of traffic you so generously generate has led to a lot of spam posting.  In an effort to keep the spam to a minimum, I am taking the time to moderate comments now.   

Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson  Disclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


Meet the Doula: Kimberly

Posted on April 5, 2013 at 9:23 AM Comments comments (21)
I am so pleased to introduce our students and readers to Kimberly Flake in this month’s Meet The Doula feature.  Kimberly has been a doula for a few of our students, all of whom have had great experiences with her.  I wanted to feature her in April, Cesarean Awareness Month, since she, herself, is a VBAC mama, and she specializes in VBAC support.

When was the first time you heard the word, “doula”?
The first time I heard the word doula was when I read about it just weeks before I sat in a class to become one.

How did you decide that becoming a doula was part of your journey?
A dear friend of mine and I walked the path together as we became doula sisters. Her road was short as she learned that she was there to heal from her cesarean births. I realized that the doula path was where I was truly meant to be. I had always considered becoming a midwife and this was my first step in the process. My first few births were amazing as I was a doula for a doula, attended the birth to a woman whose husband was not present, and my own sister-in-law. All three births were amazing natural births, where I learned, shared tears of joy and truly loved these special women as they came into their own strength of motherhood. I was incredibly privileged to share in the most intimate moments in a family's life. This was where I was meant to be without question.

Are you a birth and/or a postpartum doula?
I am a birth doula and monitrice.

How long have you been a doula?
11 wonderful years this month- April 2013.  As a doula, I apply my skill sets as a registered nurse, licensed massage therapist, and doula to support a family through their pregnancy and childbirth journey.  I specialize in VBAC support and natural childbirth.

What do you enjoy the most about being a doula?
There is a moment of complete joy as women and their partners realize their goal, give birth to their baby and experience a source of empowerment that she will carry with her for the rest of her life. This brief moment in time is without question the best thing about assisting couples through the process of pregnancy, labor and childbirth.

What is your philosophy when you go to a birth space?
Keep the birth space sacred so the birthing couple can have a bonding and positive birth experience.

How do you work with and involve the Coach?
Pregnancy, labor and childbirth are a shared experience between the woman and her coach. I work with the couple prenatally to learn what management tools for labor will be most effective for them as a couple or team. As she begins labor I act as an example of techniques to support the woman facilitating a positive experience for the coach to be present and supportive however he or she wants to be. I encourage coaches to remain in the role of support to the woman in front of her, so she can look into her partners eyes and be strengthened emotionally and physically by their bond.

What is the toughest situation you have ever dealt with? How did you handle it?
The most challenging situations have been those when a family experiences the loss of their baby. Each family is individual in how they need support, but I remain with them as their doula and sister. Helping them to cope and heal is a longer process than that of a living birth, and I spend many postpartum hours with them. I have had the honor of being asked to read a mother’s remembrance of her lost son who she knew and held for only hours outside the womb. I read her words at his memorial service and will carry her sentiments with me forever.

What keeps you working as a doula?
My love for helping couples through the process of pregnancy, labor, birth, and postpartum.

What does your fee cover – how many visits or hours? Is there a different charge for a shorter labor or longer labor?
My fee is a package fee that includes the following and does not change with the length of a labor.
  • Prenatal appointments (at least two but as many as you need) 
  • 1 hour prenatal massage 
  • Prenatal education for management of labor 
  • Assistance in developing birth plan if desired to have one
  • Labor and birth support (includes support at home in early labor and hospital) Use of labor pool at home
  • Breastfeeding support
  • Postpartum visit
  • Birth story

Do you offer any other services to your clients?
Placenta encapsulation for an extra fee.

Just for fun, what do you do when you are not doula-ing?
Currently I spend most of my not doula-ing time studying to become a certified nurse midwife, with my family, and watching my kids sports and activities. When I do have some spare time I love to read, take photographs, skydive and swim.

If you are interested in interviewing Kimberly to be your doula, here is her contact information:
Tel:  (480) 216-1837

Disclaimer: 
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

Planning Your VBAC – Where to Begin

Posted on April 2, 2013 at 4:02 PM Comments comments (0)
I open today's post with the reminder that April is Cesarean Awareness Month. The World Health Organization and evidence-based practice only supports a cesarean rate of 15% or less.

While a cesarean birth can be life saving and necessary, and we are so grateful for the technology when our students need this intervention, we encourage you to know the difference between a variation and complication. Is Mom okay? Is Baby okay? If yes to both questions, asking for time can spare both Mom and Baby from an "unnecesarean". 

The current cesarean rate in the US is around 32-33%, so our wish at Sweet Pea Births is that by raising awareness, only the necessary cesareans are performed, and that over time we see our national cesarean rate back down to at or under 15%.

If a VBAC is not an option you want to explore, I encourage you to explore the ideas and additional readings HERE to learn more about a family-centered cesarean that may be a gentler experience for both mother and baby.  With time and planning with your care provider, these are possible and a beautiful option for families that want and/or need a repeat cesarean.

On to the topic:  Where do you begin if you want to plan for a Vaginal Birth After Cesarean?  

These notes are from an ICAN meeting presented by ICAN of Phoenix chapter leaders Stephanie Stanley and Jessica Franks on January 23, 2013, hence they get the author by-line on this one.  Thank you, ladies, for your constant support of the cesarean community in the Phoenix area.  Here are the steps that Stephanie and Jessica identified in hindsight of their VBAC journeys.

Step 1:  Find a supportive care provider
Your options for finding a supportive care provider in Arizona include an obstetrician in a hospital setting, a Certified Nurse-Midwife in a hospital setting, and Naturopathic Doctor who also holds a Certified Professional Midwife license in a home setting.  In addition, you an interview at Women’s Birth and Wellness Center in Mesa, Arizona, to see if you are a candidate for a VBAC at their birth center.  If you are in the Phoenix area, you can check the ICAN Phoenix provider list HERE to see which care providers have been supportive as per first-hand experience from VBAC mothers.

Step 2: How do I know if someone is truly supportive?
The only way to really know if a care provider is going to go along with your choice for a trial of labor that you hope is going to lead to a vaginal birth is the interview them.  Schedule an appointment with them and meet them face-to-face.  Here are some questions you can ask – you want to keep them open-ended so that you hear their spontaneous answer.
  • How do you feel about letting a VBAC mom go to forty-two (42) weeks gestation?
  • How do you feel about natural birth?
  • What are specific protocols and what is the timeline you follow with a VBAC mother?
  • Which pushing position do you support when a mom is attempting a VBAC?
  • How do you feel about doulas in the labor and delivery space?
  • What are my options if I should need a repeat cesarean?
  It is important to get out of the mindset that the obstetrician or care provider as the authority over you.  You are the consumer.  You are hiring a person to care for you and your baby.  A big red flag warning is the statement, “Well, we’ll deal with that when we come to that.”  That usually means that, “When we get there, we are doing it my way,” so consider it a sign that it may be time to move on to the next person on your list.
Step 3: Be Healthy, Starting Now
Your nutrition is vital to your health, your pregnancy, your baby and your birth.  Maintain a healthy diet and exercise on a regular basis.

Krystyna’s note:  A comprehensive childbirth education class, like The Bradley Method®, prepares mothers over the course of the twelve week series to eat well to build a strong body and a strong baby, and we have a pregnancy exercise program that builds stamina as well as the three major muscle groups that support pregnancy and labor: Back, Belly, and Bottom.

Step 4: Mental Health
Your mental health plays a significant role in your pregnancy and birth.
A childbirth preparation course can educate you on the course of labor so that there are *less* surprises – all labors have an unknown factor and you can’t be “completely” prepared.
  • Work through any fears you had going into your last birth, or that have arisen as a result of your previous birth.
  • Strive to reduce stress and tension in your daily life.
  • Surround yourself with supportive, positive, and helpful people.
  • Be honest with yourself and with your partner – you need to address how both of you are feeling in regards to your past birth and the preparations for a VBAC.
  • Identify what your needs are, and what needs to be addressed.  Do the same for your partner.
  • Evaluate your mindset: are you going to go along with what your doctor tells you to do, or are you going to educate yourselves as a team so that you can make informed decisions?

Step 5: Take A Childbirth Education ClassThere are several options for birthing families these days.  Here are some of the classes mentioned in the meeting:
  • Birthing From Within
  • The Bradley Method®
  • Hypnobirthing: might work better if you have a yoga background
  • Hypnobabies: some consider it a more “user-friendly” version of Hypnobirthing
  • Private Comprehensive Class taught by a doula or independent childbirth educator

Krystyna's Note:  The Bradley Method® is fabulous as a comprehensive preparation course. You can click HERE to see what is taught through the  course of the 12-week series.  However, we do not do anything in-depth to address any past birth trauma or fears that you may be bringing to the birth space.  If you are interested in The Bradley Method®, please contact me to discuss some additional resources I recommend for VBAC couples enrolled in our course.

Step 6:  Plan To Hire A Doula
Doulas are an essential part of your birth plan.  A doula is a woman whose only role is to support a family through their labor, birth and the choices they want for their birth.  They may offer ideas for labor positions, moral support and hands-on help, among other things.  Typically people hire their doula between 24-30 weeks.  There is no “right time” to hire a doula, so even if you are earlier or later than this window, you can make phone calls and find the right person to support you and your partner through your birth experience.  Some insurance companies cover the doula fee, so call them and ask!
Step 7:  Get Family Support
The support of the people closet in regards to your decision to VBAC is very important. 
  • Educate your family – invite them to come along to a cesarean support group meeting, such as ICAN.
  • Honestly express why this is important and what led you to this decision.
  • Understand that if something or someone is not helpful, supportive or positive, then it or they do not need to be a part of your birth.

Krystyna’s Note: My favorite line of conversation I have heard at an ICAN meeting, and that I know share with our students in regards to birth choices is this: 
“I have taken the time to educate myself and make the right choice for our family.  Do you really think that I would make a choice to intentionally harm myself, or our child?  If we cannot come to an understanding, or at least agree to disagree, this topic is off the table and no longer up for discussion.”


Step 8: Educate Yourself
Knowing the facts about VBAC will give you more confidence in your decision, as well as prepare you to educate those who may question the safety of your decision.
  • Read, read, read.
  • Read positive VBAC birth stories
  • Talk with your care provider – know their VBAC numbers
  • Ask questions and research the information you are finding

 Step 9:  From a Birth Plan
A birth plan is a great way to organize and prepare your goals.  It is a tool to help you articulate the vision you have for this birth.  Birth plans are typically written around 30 weeks, but there is no “right time” to write a birth plan.
  • Write your VBAC plan
  • Consider writing your cesarean birth plan
  • Talk with your care provider about your birth plan.  If your care provider is not on board, talk with them to explore if there is a way to make it workable.  What are your absolutes, and are your communicating them effectively?
If you are absolutely confident that other care providers have supported the choices you are making, then it may be time to interview other care providers.

Step 10:  Breathe
It will be okay!  Your body knows how to have babies.  In the swirl of activity, remind yourself to relax and enjoy your pregnancy!   
Krystyna’s Note:  However this birth is going to go, your body is still in the midst of the miracle of creating an entirely new human being over the course of the pregnancy.  You are an amazing, creative goddess – enjoy the glow and revel in your growing baby bump!
 
Are you planning/have you had a VBAC?  What is/was been important to you?
 
Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 
*I think* that the amount of traffic you so generously generate has led to a lot of spam posting.  In an effort to keep the spam to a minimum, I am taking the time to moderate comments now
Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
LINK LIST
Family-centered Cesarean
http://blog.ican-online.org/2012/04/14/the-family-centered-cesarean/

ICAN of Phoenix Provider List
http://icanofphoenix.weebly.com/valley-resources.html    

Bradley Method Course Outline
http://www.bradleybirth.com/krystynabowman?Page=5

Disclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.


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