Shopping Cart
Your Cart is Empty
Quantity:
Subtotal
Taxes
Shipping
Total
There was an error with PayPalClick here to try again
CelebrateThank you for your business!You should be receiving an order confirmation from Paypal shortly.Exit Shopping Cart

Sweet Pea Births

Chandler, Arizona

Sweet Pea Births

...celebrating every swee​t pea their birth

Blog

Q&A with SPB: DIY Padsicles

Posted on January 17, 2017 at 6:27 AM Comments comments (0)
Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale

Here is PART II of our VLOGS with guest doula, Michelle Ludwig from Modern Mama Doula Services.
 
Last week, she showed us her TOP 5 picks for postpartum.  Today she is going to share her DIY tutorial for you to make soothing postpartum “padsicles” right at home during pregnancy so that they are ready for you when you are home holding your sweet pea!



 
What you need:
-Witch Hazel ~ we both really like the Humphrey’s brand – available in regular or organic)
-Maxi-pads ~ if you can find them, get some chemical-free and bleach-free; usually available online
-Cookie Sheet
-Freezer Storage Bags
 
How to:
1) Open up all the pads and leave them on the wrapper so that they don’t stick to each other later
 
2) Lay them all out on your cookie sheet
 
3) Spray the witch hazel on to the pads until they are wet BUT not dripping
 
4) Put the whole cookie tray into the freezer for about two hours
 
5) Once the witch hazel has frozen, take them back out of the freezer and fold them back up for storage.  Place them in a freezer storage bag and back into the freezer while you wait for your Sweet Pea to make their appearance.
 
6) Use them during the postpartum period on top of the large postpartum pads you will receive in your birth kit or from the hospital.
 
They will be a little chilly at first, but after the initial freeze they will feel great on your bottom.
 
I did ask Michelle what her experience was with other “add-ons”. Some info out on the internet suggests using lavender essential oil or aloe vera gel along with the witch hazel on the pads when you are preparing them.
 
As Michelle so wisely answered, less is more. Witch hazel is an extremely effective healing agent, and it would be a bummer to find out that you are allergic to lavender or aloe vera when you are trying to heal from birth, learning to breastfeed and figuring out your mothering.
 
The witch hazel and pads are part of Michelle’s especially prepared Bump Boxes.  Along with the items for padsicles, you will also receive some hand crafted postpartum essentials that she makes herself.  You can order Michelle’s specially made with love package from her HERE
 
Would you like to interview Michelle as a doula? Please read her meet the doula feature HERE
 
Contact Michelle:
WEB http://www.modernmamadoula.com/
CELL OR TEXT 7204098977


Disclaimer: 
Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, ScottsdaleThe material included in this video is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The viewer should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and video contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.
 
Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale

Q&A with SPB: Avoiding Epsiotomy and Perineal Tears

Posted on February 17, 2015 at 7:04 PM Comments comments (0)
Q: "What things can we do to help decrease the need for an episiotomy or the likelihood of a perineal tear?"  
A: Here is a list of seven things you can do during pregnancy and while you are in labor to birth with an intact perineum.  The written list and more ideas are listed below.
 





Here is a summary of today's VLOG on YouTube:

Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonBradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
 
My list from the VLOG:

  • Squatting throughout pregnancy
  • Kegel throughout pregnancy
  • Good nutrition, including healthy fats & oils
  • No soap on the perineum - it is drying
  • Lotion and massage - if desired and ok'd by care provider
  • Talk to care provider in advance about having an episiotomy versus tearing
  • Be patient during pushing phase of birth
  • Push with self-control
  • Ease or "breathe" the baby out
  • Remind doctor or midwife of your wishes at birth
  • Listen for the words "local" or "local anesthetic" - those are red flags for a jab and a cut!!

How can pelvic floor exercises help you if you are trying to avoid an episiotomy:

  • Kegels (pelvic floor contraction and relaxation) – during pregnancy it tones the muscle; a toned perineum encourages the baby’s chin to their chest making presenting part of the head smaller; control of the muscle helps slow down pushing if necessary to prevent tear
  • Squatting - during pregnancy it stretches and tones the muscle making it supple; during labor it opens outlet of pelvis making birth easier for you and the baby

           
A healthy pregnancy diet:  Eating well, including healthy fats and oils, promotes healthy, stretchable tissue
Some that we mention in class include

  • flax seeds or chia seeds in smoothies or sprinkled on top of salads
  • flax oil, walnut oil, or avocado oil as part of a salad dressing
  • heat-tolerant oils as ingredients in a marinade for cooking
  • lots of raw healthy fats: nuts and avocados

 
Perineal massage - talk to your care provider first – you can print THIS and THIS information and have a discussion with them

Concept behind "breathe your baby out"
Work with your breath and your contractions – only push when you have the urge to push, abdominal breaths between contractions, hold breath only as comfortable
 
More information not included in today's VLOG...I'm thinking we'll have to do a how-to for some of these...
If you have some uncomfortable perineal stretching or an episiotomy (even with awesome preparation, there are times when it happens for a healthy mom, healthy baby outcome), here are some comfort measures to ease the pain: 
 
Sitz bath twice a day with sea salt or herbs
Make an ice pack out of a diaper – slit through the middle and fill with ice.  The diaper absorbs the melting ice and supplies the coolness.
Fill a gallon bag with four maxi-pads (the non-stick kind) and soak them with witch hazel – then freeze them.  Pull out to use as needed on the perineum
 
Our midwives also introduced us to some items you can find on-line: perineal packs and some amazing herbs that will help with healing.  You can find them at http://www.everythingbirth.com/Birth-Supplies.html

 


Disclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

Info Sheet: Episiotomy

Posted on June 18, 2013 at 8:40 AM Comments comments (0)
Episiotomy:  A surgical cut made at the opening of the vagina during childbirth

Anatomy of the perineum
Anatomy of the perineum
From WikiCommons
Types of Episiotomy
Types of Episiotomy
From WikiCommons
Definitions from WikiParents:
1st Degree – This is a small incision that goes through just the skin of the perineum
2nd Degree – This is the most common degree of episiotomy, it cuts through both the skin of the perineum as well as the underlying tissue
3rd Degree – Cuts through the skin of the perineum as well as the underlying tissue and the muscle that surrounds the anus
4th Degree – Through the skin of the perineum as well as the underlying tissue and the muscle that surrounds the anus and into the lining of the rectum
Midline - the incision is made starting at the vaginal opening, and continues in a straight line towards the anus
Medio-lateral - begins at the vaginal opening and angles off towards the buttocks at a 45 degree angle.


Why was it developed?  What was it supposed to treat?
Mayo Clinic: “An episiotomy was thought to help prevent more extensive vaginal tears during childbirth — and heal better than a natural tear. The procedure was also thought to keep the bladder from drooping and the rectum from protruding into the vagina after childbirth.”
Medicine.Net: “It can also decrease trauma to the vaginal tissues...Doctors who favor episiotomies argue that a surgical incision is easier to repair than a spontaneous irregular or extensive tear, and is likely to lead to a more favorable outcome with fewer complications.”

Has it been effective?
Mayo Clinic: “Research suggests that routine episiotomies don't prevent these problems after all.”
2005 study conclusion: "Routine episiotomy achieves no short‐term goals that it has been hypothesized to achieve. Indeed, routine use is harmful to the degree that it creates a surgical incision of greater extent than many women might have experienced had episiotomy not been performed."

History:
From social to surgical: historical perspectives on perineal care during labour and birth
“A review of key historical texts that mentioned perineal care was undertaken from the time of Soranus (98-138 A.D.) to modern times as part of a PhD into perineal care. Historically, perineal protection and comfort were key priorities for midwives, most of whom traditionally practised under a social model of care. With the advent of the Man-Midwife in the seventeenth and eighteenth century, the perineum became pathologised and eventually a site for routine surgical intervention--most notably seen in the widespread use of episiotomy. There were several key factors that led to the development of a surgical rather than a social model in perineal care. These factors included a move from upright to supine birth positions, the preparation of the perineum as a surgical site through perineal shaving and elaborate aseptic procedures; and the distancing of the woman from her support people, and most notably from her own perineum. In the last 30 years, in much of the developed world, there has been a re-emergence of care aimed at preserving and protecting the perineum. A dichotomy now exists with a dominant surgical model competing with the re-emerging social model of perineal care. Historical perspectives on perineal care can help us gain useful insights into past practices that could be beneficial for childbearing women today. These perspectives also inform future practice and research into perineal care, whilst making us cautious about political influences that could lead to harmful trends in clinical practice.”
Copyright © 2010 Australian College of Midwives.

Pros - When an episiotomy might be medically necessary:
  • Baby is in an abnormal position and might need manipulation or forceps to aid in vaginal delivery
  • Baby needs to be delivered quickly due to fetal distress
  • Extensive vaginal tearing appears likely: easier to repair a single cut than multiple jagged edges

Cons of episiotomy:
  • Higher incidence of a third or fourth degree tear that extends into the external anal sphincter and the rectum
  • More blood loss
  • More pain and discomfort in the postpartum period
  • Painful intercourse
  • Incontinence
  • Additional surgeries to repair or reduce discomfort from initial episiotomy

Links to continue your research and draw your own conclusion about what is best for your family:
2005 Hartmann et al Study The Use of Episiotomy in Obstetrical Care: A Systematic Review: Summary
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0010365/

Has the incidence of episiotomy decreased since the 2005 study:

From The Mayo Clinic:
Epsiotomy: When It’s Needed, When It’s Not

From Childbirth Connection
Preventing Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: Episiotomy

From Childbirth Connection
Preventing Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: Tips & Tools to avoid episiotomy

Science & Sensibility
What Is the Evidence for Perineal Massage During Pregnancy to Prevent Tearing?

Science & Sensibility
Tribute to Dr. Michael Klein with video about history of episiotomy and information about his studies

Summary of Dr. Klein’s Study

Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer:  
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.