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Sweet Pea Births

Chandler, Arizona

Sweet Pea Births

...celebrating every swee​t pea their birth

Blog

Q&A with SPB: How does finger-feeding work?

Posted on August 16, 2016 at 2:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Today's Q&A with SPB might be helpful to families who are anxious to avoid "nipple confusion", something that makes it harder for babies to breastfeed when they have had an early introduction to bottle feeding.

Instead of supplemental feeding of breastmilk or formula with a bottle, this technique is one of the feeding strategies that a family might want to try in order to feed baby and keep things happy at the breast.

Here is our Q&A with SPB question of the week, answered by our friend Michelle Hottya the IBCLC over at The Milk Spot.














Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa,
If you should have questions about today's information, be sure to reach out to your local IBCLC for help.  You can find one in your area by visiting www.ilca.org.

I hope you enjoyed and learned something from today's special Breastfeeding Edition of Q&A with SPB.  We'll be back next week with another installment with the IBCLCs from the Arizona Breastfeeding Center!


Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa,

Do you have a question for the IBCLCs this month? 
Be sure to leave a comment so we can have them answer it for you.

UPCOMING EVENT 
Phoenix La Leche League: Live, Latch, Love
As part of the LLL area conference
August 26th, 5-7 PM
Embassy Suites Biltmore
 
La Leche League Conference
August 26-28, 2016
Embassy Suites Biltmore


Birthing From Within and Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: convenient to Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa,

Disclaimer: 
The material included in this video is for informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The viewer should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog and video contain information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained in this video and on our blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

In Their Own Words: Kate

Posted on August 27, 2013 at 9:42 AM Comments comments (0)
This is part of an "In Their Own Words" series in honor of Breastfeeding Awareness Month 2013.  Here at Sweet Pea Births we celebrate and honor all breastfeeding relationships, and want to share these stories with you to empower and inspire you.  No matter how the journey starts, with help, support, and persistence, most mothers can achieve the breastfeeding relationship they want with their nurslings.  If you would like to submit your story, please email me at krystyna{at}sweetpeabirths{dot}com.  Sweet Pea Births understands that not all mothers can or want to breastfeed.  These stories are shared for learning purposes, not to judge the choices we make when we feed our children.

Kate’s Story:
My breastfeeding adventure

I had always known I wanted to breastfeed, and there wasn't really a thought otherwise. During my pregnancy I took a breastfeeding class that I found very informative and helpful! I also knew from friends and family who breastfed that it isn't supposed to hurt, it takes some getting used to and practice, etc. Although I felt ready, nothing could have prepared me for what my experience was actually going to be.

My son was born perfectly healthy, but 5 weeks early and not even 4 pounds. I was planning a home birth, so having him early and at a hospital was way outside of my plan already. There was no clear reason for the pre-term labor and they only had him in the NICU for 6 days out of precaution.

Two hours after he was born they finally let me go to the NICU to hold and attempt to nurse my baby!! A lactation consultant was there and 'helped' him latch. Honestly he nestled and really did it all on his own. So she said, "Great!  That's so awesome and surprising for such an early baby," and left. Seconds later he unlatched and it was all downhill from there.

The NICU nurses told me he couldn't nurse because he was too young and just too tired for it. So, I believed them. Every 2-3 hours I would try nursing (he would often latch, but it wouldn't last long), bottle feed him breast milk (some nurses let me feed him, others refused to let me saying they had to do it themself), and then I would return to my room to pump, eat, and rest. I was lucky if they let me stay with my baby for more then 30min (except one nurse who let me stay as long as I wanted, encouraged bare skin contact the whole time I was there, and let me do everything - feeding, changing). This continued the whole 6 days he was in the NICU - try to nurse, bottle feed what I had pumped, pump some more. Finally we got to go home!

He was still having the same issues with unlatching and seeming very tired. I hated feeding him from a bottle and pumping, it is not at all what I imagined for our relationship. Plus I already felt like I had missed out on his first 6 days of life with all the NICU restrictions (it still saddens me!). I had this gut feeling that something else was causing the nursing issues, but didn't trust myself since the 'professionals' told me why he couldn't nurse. He would latch perfectly, had a wonderful suck, but couldn't last more then 30sec before being tired and upset by hunger. I had been producing/leaking colostrum for at least a month before he was born, milk came in full force on day 3, and I had an oversupply the whole time (common in my family I guess). Finally I decided to go with my mom instinct and schedule an appointment with an IBCLC.

We went to my lactation consult and she weighed my son, felt his suck with a gloved finger, had me show her how I hold him and latch (gave me some pointers to make it easier/more comfortable), and let him nurse as long as he wanted (which wasn't long), and then weighed again to see how much he got. She also checked my pump flanges and they were SO the wrong size and causing lots of discomfort!  I didn't even know they had sizes!! Pretty sure the hospital should mention that when they give you the pump kit there..  anyway... 

When she felt his suck she told me she was pretty sure he had a tongue tie, which was probably the cause of unlatching and tiredness since it makes maintaining the latch and sucking SO much more work. We finished our wonderful, helpful appointment and she referred me to a pediatrician who specializes in tongue-tie.

We set up our consult with the pediatrician as soon as possible. A week later we had our appointment;  sure enough he had a tongue-tie! We set up another appointment for the procedure the next week. He had his tongue-tie clipped at 6-weeks and nursed right after the procedure for the longest so far.

I talked with my husband and we decided to give up bottles cold-turkey now that the tongue tie was taken care of, but I would continue pumping. So, I would offer him my breast and let him nurse or try as long as he wanted and if he was getting upset I would sneak a syringe full of breast milk between his lip and my skin and squeeze in a bit every time he sucked. We continued that for a couple days until I gradually got rid of the syringe as he was healing and getting used to his new tongue mobility. 

After a few days he was, thankfully, nursing happily with not a bottle in sight and I gave my hospital grade pump back to the rental company. I only pumped occasionally to have milk for date nights or if my oversupply was bugging me. Our son nursed happily for 12mo until he weaned himself, my son LOVES food. =D

Looking forward to a second child (hopefully sometime 2014) and breastfeeding again! I will definitely follow my mommy instincts right away next time!!!

Disclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.

Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, Payson
We are now enrolling for Fall 2013 Series
The Bradley Method® for New Parents:
September 6, 2013 through November 22, 2013
Classes meet at 6:30 pm

Bradley™ “Next” – full series plus focus on sibling preparation
September 7, 2013 through November 23, 2013
Classes meet at 2:00 pm

For more information or to register, please call us at 602-684-6567 or email us at [email protected]


Insurance May Cover Lactation Consults

Posted on August 6, 2013 at 8:23 AM Comments comments (1)
I am happy to share information about lactation care as it relates to the Affordable Care Act with you today.  Desiree, a friend of mine from Phoenix, has been kind enough to share her vast knowledge on the topic.  She has spent countless hours on the phone with the insurance companies learning how to best use the law in favor of nursing mothers.  This is the first in a three-part series on how you, as a lactating mama, can use the Affordable Care Act to your advantage.

What a relief, to know that you might be able to use insurance to cover Lactation Consults in the early days after you deliver your baby.  This is the first in a series of articles on the Affordable Healthcare Act as it relates to breastfeeding: 

  1. What is the benefit provided by the ACA?
  2. How can I request coverage for a Lactation Consult with an IBCLC
  3. What do I do if my insurance company does not contract with an IBCLC?

 
I am an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant in private practice and I share this material for informational purposes only.  Each insurance plan is a little different and it is best to call and request the specifics from your individual plans. 

Copied from the Health Services Administration website:  Non-grandfathered plans and issuers are required to provide coverage without cost sharing consistent with these guidelines in the first plan year (in the individual market, policy year) that begins on or after August 1, 2012”  http://www.hrsa.gov/womensguidelines/

At first glance the law seems pretty straightforward.  Breastfeeding support, supplies and counseling by a trained provider is covered for non-grandfathered plans renewing 08/01/2012.    It is included in Women’s Expanded Preventive  Services Benefits.  If you qualify for the breast pump or free contraception, you likely have the coverage, but call first.  It is supposed to cover services without applying to your copay or your deductible. 
 
Here is where it becomes less straightforward: the law does not define who exactly is the trained provider, how long the services must be rendered, and that it apply to both in-network and out-of-network benefits.  The US Surgeon General, in her Breastfeeding Call to Action in 2011, explained the provider of choice for the services is an IBCLC.  IBCLC credentialing is essential for Lactation Consultants providing Lactation Services to breastfeeding mothers.  The credentialing process entails coursework, 2000+ counseling hours with mothers, following a code of ethics, and an international board exam.  We recertify every 5 years with 75 hours of CERPS and take the board exam every 10 years.  It is considered the gold standard of Lactation Care and is equivalent to a Physical Therapist, Speech & Language Pathologist, or Occupational Therapist in years of study, counseling, assessment, and intervention skills. 
 
Insurance companies often assume it is the OBGYN, Pediatrician, or hospital IBCLCs who provide the service.  What they don’t realize is OBGYNs and Pediatricians often refer to IBCLCs and that most women need additional help after leaving the hospital when her milk comes in.  Insurance companies may confirm you have the benefits, but neglect to inform you that it is only available with an in-network provider.  Confirm whether you company contracts with an IBCLC and if not clarify whom it feels is a trained provider.  If, you are given a pump rental company, and they are not a trained provider, then push for an IBCLC.  Currently there are two insurance companies in AZ contracting with IBCLCs- Aetna and BCBSAZ.  United Health Care is exploring the possibility, but no contracts yet and CIGNA will not contract with IBCLCs. 
 
I imagine this is all clear as mud to you right now.  What I often recommend to my clients is that you call your insurance company to clarify benefits and policies while you are pregnant, between 28 weeks-36 weeks of pregnancy, that way if you need the services once your baby is born, you can have peace of mind preparing for birth and breastfeeding.  If you can, get their responses in writing.  My next article will cover how to request coverage from your insurance company. 

 
Desiree Allison, IBCLC
602.903.0002

I am an Aetna contracted provider and am negotiating with several other insurance companies for contracts.  I have a passion to help mothers and babies thrive.  I have been an IBCLC for 3 years and have over 8years experience as a breastfeeding volunteer with an international organization.  Most importantly, I am a mother of three incredibly inquisitive and independent children.

Please leave us a comment - it will be moderated and posted. 
In an effort to keep the spam to a minimum, I am taking the time to moderate comments now.
 

Bradley Method® natural childbirth classes offered in Arizona: Chandler, Tempe, Ahwatukee, Gilbert, Mesa, Scottsdale, PaysonDisclaimer: 
The material included on this site is for informational purposes only.
It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult her or his healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation.  Krystyna and Bruss Bowman and Bowman House, LLC accept no liability for the content of this site, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided.  This blog contains information about our classes available in Chandler, AZ and Payson, AZ and is not the official website of The Bradley Method®. The views contained on this blog do not necessarily reflect those of The Bradley Method® or the American Academy of Husband-Coached Childbirth®.